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Yes, the spinocerebellar tract ends in the ipsilateral cerebellum. The gracile tract is a bundle of axon fibers in the dorsal root. The neural cell bodies are in the dorsal root ganglions. The tectospinal tract is part of extrapyramidal tract that connects midbrain (mesencephalon) with the spinal cord. Didin't get exactly what you meant but: the lateral ...


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It is possible by using 13C NMR Spectroscopy. It has been done after infusing enriched D-[1-13C]glucose in six healthy children. The results showed that at euglycemia glucose concentration is about 1 micromol/ml. From a study by Rolf Gruetter on NCBI.


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The optic nerve fibers cross inside the optic chiasm sharing the same shell: The crossing fibers go ones between others, like on this classical picture -


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You can read why spontaneous neuronal firing, called retinal waves, are important to structuring the wiring of mammalian retinal representation in dominance columns. Galli L., Maffei L. (1988). "Spontaneous Impulse Activity of Rat Retinal Ganglion Cells in Prenatal Life." Science, 242


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The neurohormones in most mammals include oxytocin and vasopressin, both of which are produced in the hypothalamic region of the brain and secreted into the blood by the neurohypophysis (part of the pituitary gland). A second group of neurohormones, called releasing hormones, also originates in the hypothalamus. The members of this group, however, are ...


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The dynamic-dominance hypothesis of handedness states that the essential factor that distinguishes dominant from nondominant arm performance is the facility governing the control of limb dynamics. Sainburg (1) writes that It should be noted that dominant arm advantages do not apply to all tasks, or all aspects of tasks. Healey et al. (1986) examined an ...


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I don't know for sure, but I would say that it is due to the over stimulation of the dopamine receptors. A bit like how type II diabetes can be caused by an excess production of insulin; eventually the body responds less to the presence of insulin, and is less able to convert glucose into glycogen. The same could apply to the dopamine receptors and the ...


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Crossing or decussation is a lot more robust against wiring errors than their seemingly simpler same-sided wiring counterparts. See here for the research carried out to establish this and for more detail.


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I assume that you mean energy consumption. Talking in round numbers the daily energy requirement of a sedentary human is 2,500 kcal. It's usually said that the brain uses 20% of this energy. What does this mean in terms of power consumption? 500 kcal = 500 x 1000 x 4.2 J -[1] 24 h = 24 x 60 x 60 s -[2] 1 W = 1 J/s therefore brain power = ...


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Yes is the simple answer. A nerve will go up to a specific part of the brain which the brain knows corresponds to a certain region of the body. It isn't perfect though e.g. pain in the diaphragm confuses the brain which doesn't recognise that pain must be coming from there so instead tells the body there is shoulder pain, however this is useful in medicine. ...


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I'm not sure if why is referring to the biological basis or the reasoning for why it is beneficial but I've briefly summarised both. If you'd like more detail just accept and ask again clarifying your exact interest in this broad question. Pain is taken up through the spinothalamic pathway but at may opportunities it may be blocked. It may be blocked by ...


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In many hormonrs, the hypothalamus produces a hormone which acts on the pituitary gland which subsequently acts on an end organ. Taking your example of the thyroid gland let's take a look at it. The hypothalamus produces TRH which acts on the anterior pituitary causing it to release TSH which in turn stimulates the thyroid gland to make thyroid hormones T3 ...


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I just came across this answer when I was answering another related question. Although this is closed there is a strong claim from the accepted answer which needs to be toned down. Cessation of stimulation does not always mean cessation of propagation. Once an action potential(AP) is fired it does not necessarily stop its propagation in the next cell. Also ...


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Underneath the superficial layers of your skin there are receptors which sense pressure, temperature and pain. These receptors are part of the peripheral nervous system which senses stimuli and they take the message conveying details about the stimulus to the somatosensory cortex of the brain. Here is where the perception of pain, burning, pressure etc is ...



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