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Connections between the brain and other parts of the body are made with action potentials. The action potential is an electric charge that travels along the axon of the neuron, which is covered in an inconsistent myelin sheath. Myelin clumps along each axon, so the axon could appear segmented. The more myelin clumps there are, the faster the action potential ...


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The no. of neurons only increase during development. As, a person grows, the no. of neurons is constant or decreases (degradation due to injury or other brain diseases). The no. never increases. Learning anything (say, a phone no.) requires repeated thinking. The thinking can be continuous in the brain or re-induced by revision. Therefore, learning ...


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Zickefoose et al. did a study, and showed that while you might improve while playing the game, it called into question if you actually improved outside of just getting better at the game. Redick et al. also reported that when they did a double blind study in brain games like Luminosity that you improved in the games, but they didn't see any transfer from ...


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Short answer In terms of visual function, the low-tier primary visual cortex and high-tier frontal cortex are inactivated. The activity of the intermediate ventral stream and limbic regions are increased, apparently uncoupling low- and high-level vision processing from the system. Background The sleep stage where visualizations (dreaming) occur is called ...


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MIT Open Course Ware has a course on genetics, which uses the following text: "An Introduction to Genetic Analysis", Griffiths, Anthony J. F., Jeffrey H. Miller, David T. Suzuki, Richard C. Lewontin, and William M. Gelbart, 7th ed. New York: W. H. Freeman, 2000.


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GENETICS: Analysis and Principles, 4th edition, Robert J. Booker This book is used in my school's ( NYU Poly) undergraduate genetics class.


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Action potentials of single neurons (APs) are the building blocks of compound action potentials (CAPs). While each of the individual APs is a yes-or-no response with a clear-cut defined threshold, CAPs are not. CAPs are build up of hundreds or thousands of neuronal contributions in, e.g., the auditory nerve. Decreased responsiveness as well as ...


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Short answer External stimuli can drive autonomic responses. Background The autonomic nervous system is a visceral sensory and motor system. The viscera are the internal organs. Virtually all visceral reflexes are mediated by local circuits in the brain stem or spinal cord (Fig. 1). It is one of two major subdivisions of the nervous system; the other being ...


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Short answer Negative ions can flow against the electrical gradient into the cell, provided their concentration gradient across the cell membrane is large enough. Background When an ion channel opens, the resultant ion flow is dependent on two things; the membrane potential (which is indeed negative at rest) and the concentration gradient of the ion. ...


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I would say the human brain overfits all the time! Gambling addiction, superstition and anxiety disorders are all examples of overfitting. We are optimized for seeking patterns and avoiding threats. Our brains mess this up all the time! But having said that, one of the major differences between the human brain and a neural network is the amount of ...



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