New answers tagged

1

Since these are fluorescent dyes, the most likely method of use is with some sort of fluorescent (likely confocal) microscope. The various types of dyes have different hydrophobic tails, so they target different types of membranes (plasma membrane, mitochondrial membranes, etc.). An excitatory light source (typically a laser, with a single wavelength) is ...


3

Just as an FYI, the answer is emphatically yes. I have two separate areas of my body which exhibit those symptoms. But my answer does not "track" those of others here. They talk about (I would guess) some relatively standard off-site pain actions. In my case, it appears to be more simply the action of (for want of a better term) CrossedNerves. As one ...


4

Another common medical condition that causes pain elsewhere is the spinal disc herniation. The disc pushes against the nerves in the spinal and causes pain, usually in the leg, foot or arm. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinal_disc_herniation Sometimes the pain disappears with rest, sometimes surgery is necessary and sometimes the pain partly remains even ...


14

Yes, this is pretty common. Examples include sciatica, pain felt down the back of a leg to the foot, from irritation to components of the sciatic nerve but commonly at the level of the sciatic nerve roots angina pectoris, pain from myocardial ischaemia felt in the throat (Latin angina "infection of the throat"), arms, chest etc shoulder tip pain from a ...


7

An example of pain evoked by distant sites in the body is referred pain. It's defined as pain perceived at a location other than the site of the painful stimulus. An example is the case of angina pectoris (chest pain), caused by myocardial ischemia (decreased oxygen supply to the heart due to a narrowing or complete blockage of the coronary arteries). ...


1

Neurons have been shown to secrete exosomes (extracellular vesicles containing RNA) which may regulate neighbouring cells. However, this is mechanistically different from synaptic signalling by neurotransmitters. Moreover, I am not sure if exosome secretion is linked with synaptic activity and whether it plays a role in memory formation. Even if exosomal ...


4

I have never heard of this pathway. Memory is usually assoiciated with synaptic plasticity by ‘Long-term potentiation’ (LTP), which has glutamate as a neurotransmitter. Neuroscience Exploring the brain (Bear, et al,. 2007), has a pretty good explanation of this process, if you're interrested. Motor patterns have more mechanisms than LTP, and are not as well ...


4

You talk about memory loss. The hippocampus is involved in the formation and storage of memories and indeed one of the few places in the brain where new neurons are formed. The formation of new neurons here is indeed linked to the formation of memories (Coras et al., 2010). Hippocampal neurons do not lack centrioles (Dotti & Banker, 1991; Poppov & ...


1

Nonclinical depression is a popular term for the natural reactions to the external factors, such as loss, seasonal changes, emotional stress http://www.depressionfree.com/non-clinical.html while the major types of clinical depression are as follows: Major Depressive Disorder Major depression is a severe mental disorder that deeply affects an individual’s ...


1

So, are repetitions wanted in this kind of experiment? Yes: repetitions reduce random noise and increase the chance to tell artifact from response. Adaptation is a serious issue, typically becoming apparent by decreasing amplitudes, or even skipped responses. Reading the existing literature and/or performing experiments with various stimulus intervals ...


1

...when the movement of ions is not against their concentration gradient... This assumption is incorrect: Na+ has to be pumped out of the cell against its chemical gradient (table 1) and against its electrical gradient, given that the inside of the cell is negative (Fig. 1). ...potassium ions have diffused out in repolarization, only the sodium ions ...



Top 50 recent answers are included