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So there are no rules per say (although I wish there were). But there are commonalities among plasmid names and they can help people identify them: Include the empty backbone name in your plasmid name. This simple piece of information can often convey many important details. Once you know the backbone a plasmid is based on, you can usually derive: a) the ...


1

One of the most common methods (described by AddGene) is p (for plasmid), followed by the name of the backbone, a dash, and inserts delimited by more dashes. From this we get things like: pBluescript-CMV-mACT1-GFP. Another method which I prefer is to name all your plasmids in the format given in the question: pABC123. Here ABC is a 3 letter designation that ...


0

There actually is a rule, called the 'Principle of Priority', which states that the nomenclature of a taxonomic group is based upon priority of publication hence option 2 in your question is the correct approach. In the principle III (Principle of Priority) section of the link above it is stated that This principle states, in essence, that if a taxonomic ...


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3. is right thing to do. You can mention in the introduction that "Campylobacter fetus, which was previously known as Vibrio fetus [Ref] ........." You should not use the old name anywhere again (also for the sake of consistency), once you have made it clear that the species was renamed, in the Introduction. I don't think there is any written convention ...



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