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There are dozens of cell marker genes. The number refers to antigen protein from one of those specific genes. The number itself can be a result of any of a variety of things, from the order in which the protein was discovered to the corresponding antibody being the 125th antibody produced against the cell line or organism. These are often used as biomarkers ...


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Unfortunately there are no rigorous naming conventions for a gene. While some are based on actual molecular function or phenotypic effect, others can be totally bizarre names. Some are actually based on the test-tube and purification fraction labels. Some are named on characters from Mythology, novels etc. I'll add some examples: SNARE (proteins involved ...


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Welcome to Biology.SE. To my knowledge there is no good rule on how to name genes. The first person to name a gene or an allele is free to just pick up a that (s)he finds easy to remember and eventually intuitive. Sometime the author just picks a funny name. Here are a few examples from Drosophila melanogaster data base: bag of marbles: involved in ...



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