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3

To avoid confusion I just want to add to fileunderwater's answer the equivalent words we use to describe the "area size a population/species lives in". The spatial range a single individual occupies is generally called home range or territory (as fileunderwater said before me). The spatial range a single species (or population) occupies is called ...


6

Are you looking for 'Home range' (see also the definition in Encyclopaedia Britannica)? Generally, 'home range' is defined as the entire area an individual animal uses, while the 'territory' is the subset of the home range that is actually defended from conspecifics (in animals that show territoriality). 'Home range' is often delimited by the types of ...


2

A DNA locus may have two (or more) variants (alleles), but there isn't one termed a main or default variant. In the example you cite, Myśliwska 2009, the only asymmetric distinction between the G and C alleles that I could see was in this passage: The polymorphic region −174G>C of IL-6 encoding gene is implicated in transcription of this cytokine. The ...


2

In this case, G is the genotype used for comparison because that's what's in the reference sequence for humans. Of course, this raises the question of why that's the reference. The answer is that it's because that's the sequence from the sample used to create the BAC that was sequenced and used to create that portion of the reference sequence. Of course, ...


1

[..] G is the default and C is the polymorphism An allele (or just a nucleotide variant) cannot be "the polymorphism". There is polymorphism, if a given locus (or just a given nucleotide position) is polymorphic, that is, if as this position, there are different variants existing in the population. Therefore, an allele cannot be called polymorphism, ...


1

Encyclopedia of Life includes information on synonyms (see link for Apatosaurus) - not a list but searchable and often with references and background info. After a quick google search I also found this list from dinosaurcentral.com, but I don't know how credible and updated it is and it seems to lack references.



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