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-1

I refer the honorable gentlemen to James Harriet. He reports discovering by accident by ending the pain he was in some cases able to reverse the pathology by ending the pain with anesthetic drugs, thus allowing the body's natural healing abilities to take over. He first discovered it in a sheep by accident (insufficient dose to put it down) and later used ...


3

Just as an FYI, the answer is emphatically yes. I have two separate areas of my body which exhibit those symptoms. But my answer does not "track" those of others here. They talk about (I would guess) some relatively standard off-site pain actions. In my case, it appears to be more simply the action of (for want of a better term) CrossedNerves. As one ...


4

Another common medical condition that causes pain elsewhere is the spinal disc herniation. The disc pushes against the nerves in the spinal and causes pain, usually in the leg, foot or arm. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Spinal_disc_herniation Sometimes the pain disappears with rest, sometimes surgery is necessary and sometimes the pain partly remains even ...


14

Yes, this is pretty common. Examples include sciatica, pain felt down the back of a leg to the foot, from irritation to components of the sciatic nerve but commonly at the level of the sciatic nerve roots angina pectoris, pain from myocardial ischaemia felt in the throat (Latin angina "infection of the throat"), arms, chest etc shoulder tip pain from a ...


7

An example of pain evoked by distant sites in the body is referred pain. It's defined as pain perceived at a location other than the site of the painful stimulus. An example is the case of angina pectoris (chest pain), caused by myocardial ischemia (decreased oxygen supply to the heart due to a narrowing or complete blockage of the coronary arteries). ...



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