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First, to be clear, the very act of cannibalism does not cause the development of prions, but the consumption of an animal infected with a compatible form of them, particularly when eating nervous or digestive tissue (i.e. the brain, spine, stomach, or intestines). To directly answer your question, yes, there are other animals that are susceptible to prions ...


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The statement in the question about the current distribution of these diseases is not strictly accurate, as shown by the graphic below. [Malaria graphic: Wikipedia user, Percherie (2006); TB graphic: Corbett et al. (2003)] However there is no disputing that the contemporary and historical geographical distribution of these diseases differ. Why? The crux ...



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