Tag Info

New answers tagged

2

It depends on the seed and fruit you're talking about. The amount of DNA in your crushed up sample of plant matter depends on only one thing--how many cells are in your sample. Look at this diagram of a kernel of corn (U of Indiana): There are different cell densities in each area--in the endosperm, the cells can be huge (and therefore have a lower ...


2

PCR ideally doubles the number of amplified DNA molecules in each cycle. So after the first step you have 10 molecules, after the second 20, the third 50 and so on. The formula for the calculation is: n × 2cycles = number of molecules n is the number of molecules you start your PCR with, cycles is the number of cycles used. In your case this would be: 5 ...


2

it depends on which PCR polymerase you're using. When doing some previous methods development, I tested about half a dozen polymerases amplifying either directly on the beads or after elution. Some polymerases worked equally well under either condition, while others were completely inhibited by the presence of beads. However, elution from the beads is ...


2

Lets summarize the comments into a real answer: When the only chemical changed in your reaction is the DNA, which came from a fresh Phenol/Chloroform preparation, I would suspect it. From there, we have a few possibilities, what could have gone wrong. The most likely cause of an enzymatic reaction not working with Phenol/Chloroform prepared DNA are ...



Top 50 recent answers are included