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17

This is not really a biological answer, but a psychological one: One important fact to consider is that the perception of time is essentially a recollection of past experience, rather than perception of the present. Researchers who study autobiographical memory have suggested that part of this effect may be explained by the number of recallable memories ...


12

First recall that pink is white minus green, more or less. Now, your perception can be explained by adaptation: Neurons try to control their gain (amplification factor) to have roughly the same range of output. So if there's a lot of stimuli they like, they will reduce their gain, and vice versa. It can be thought of as a form of fast time-scale homeostasis ...


9

Flicker Fusion Threshold: The wikipedia definition: It is defined as the frequency at which an intermittent light stimulus appears to be completely steady to the average human observer. Background In 1824, Peter Mark Roget (who also wrote the famous Thesaurus) first presented the concept of "persistence of vision" to the Royal Society of London, as ...


7

I can't give a definite answer, and there's nothing in the literature about this specifically, but perhaps some relevant information and a suggested behavioural experiment will help. Background Firstly, I assume you are talking about sodium hypochlorite (which is usually what people mean by bleach)? If so, there are several compounds your cat could be ...


7

There are strong connections between the auditory cortex and the limbic system, which includes such structures as the hippocampus and the amygdala. A recent paper [1] builds on earlier notions of emotional "significance" of music without any lyrics. It adds in lyrics, so giving a perspective of which portions of the brain are reacting to which component of ...


7

First of all one should tell that one can attribute the activation of certain brain zones with some indepent events only when the activation takes place along the signal input (receptors, sensory pathways towards the cortex and the sensory areas in cortex) or motor action (=output) (along the motox cortex => motor neuron => target organ). Those zones in ...


7

There are numerous examples of visual attraction in animals. An absolute classic of an experiment, taught to most/all evolutionary biology students, is the widowbird tail length experiment by Andersson. He experimentally manipulated the tail lengths of male widowbirds at random. Some tails were made longer and some shorter. From this experiment Andersson ...


5

Absolutely. Quality by appearance is sometimes a big part of mate selection and sometimes it is not. The size and cognitive capacity brain is probably important but not always. Primates are closest to us and have most similar tastes to us, have varying levels of interest in mate appearance. Most primates have a troupe dominance where a dominant male ...


5

See this link. It provides a great overview. The answer you want is in the otolith section. To paraphrase, it states that our otolith organs are designed to help us lean forward while running to maintain our center of gravity when in motion; however, in a plane this reflex can backfire by causing a pilot to believe he is going straight when in actuality he ...


5

One way we can get evidence qualia are the same or very similar for different people is by reactions to it, beyond just the word. For example, beyond the word "pain", we have other strong reactions to pain. So nobody suspects other people might experience pain as pleasure and vice versa. Obviously not! There are no obvious signs for colour qualia, so it ...


5

There may be some clues in neurobiology. A possibility may be that a person's general emotional state may affect their perception of the passage of time, as argued in this article and references within. Studies of people with damage to their orbitofrontal cortex (prefrontal cortex region) can experience sustained altered emotional states when compared to ...


5

To explain the neurophysiological background to the existing answers I would like to add the following: The effect you are describing (pinkish appearance of white) is generally referred to as a negative after image and it is a direct reflection of the color opponency in the retina. The effect is caused by adaptation of the (in this case green) cones in the ...


4

The basis of this question is a common misconception, and unfortunately the accepted answer by @CHM is also based on this common misconception. The misconception is based on the homunculus falacy and the tendency for people to think that the image that lands on the retina is somehow 'assembled' and presented for something (the 'consciousness') to view. This ...


4

Perception of time can change drastically during an emergency. When we are younger, much like during an emergency, the brain hasn't activated very many filters for sensory data. The young have much to learn about the world and more detail is needed for the brain to make appropriate decisions. Sensory information is recorded in great detail, making time ...


4

According to the link you provided, the phenomenon Haidinger's Brush seems to be associated with the macula of the retina. The yellow color of the macula may explain the yellowness of Haidinger's Brush. This suggests to me that the brush may be an artifact of the structure of the eye, and others have claimed that Haidinger's brushes probably do not have any ...


4

It may be because, when we move our shoulders towards our the body, also know as abduction (Fig 1.) gives the central part of the body an elevation. when we rotate our arms more upwards (Adduction), the elevation will be lost. So in other words, when we are making snow angels, Start Normal position (hands near thighs) = Back and shoulders on ground ...


4

Earwax, also called cerumen, is slightly acidic (1), with a pH of about 6, and acidic foods or substances taste sour. The composition of earwax, upon which its taste depends, is related to its functions. Earwax aids in cleaning and lubrication of the ear canal and has an antimicrobial effect. The antimicrobial effect is in part attributed to its acidity, ...


3

Yes, color and shading can certainly affect depth perception, as explained by wikipedia: Aerial perspective – Due to light scattering by the atmosphere, objects that are a great distance away have lower luminance contrast and lower color saturation. Due to this, images seem blurry the farther they are away from a person's point of view. In computer ...


3

I have often wondered this myself and have never found a way this could be asserted. In fact we know that not all people perceive color the same way: up to 5% of humans are colorblind and about 2-3% of the women are tetrachromates, they have an extra cone type in their eyes (usually somewhere near the red spectrum). So it would be logical to assume that ...


3

Auditory information is routed to cerebral hemispheres via the brainstem and midbrain. Structures in the midbrain receive information from both ears and combine it (including differencing it for spatial location) before sending the combined information on to both cerebral hemispheres. Usually only the left hemisphere interprets the sound for language ...


3

With regards to the similar chemicals having similar smells, it does seem that there are trends with smell association and functional group. This wiki article has a good list of compounds and their smells, and some classes definitely give similar types of smells, amines are rotting/fecal smells (hence the names putrescine and cadaverine), while esters are ...


3

You seem to be dissociating physical beauty from fitness. In fact, beauty can be taken as a measure of biological fitness. For a classic, if simplistic example, many male humans find large breasts attractive and beautiful, however, large mammary glands are also an indication of fertility and robustness that would imply the prospective mate would be a good ...


3

Maybe the passage of time is perceived as a function of heart rate. Waiting 5 minutes for a turn on the swings is 300 seconds for a 2 year old and 300 seconds for a 40 year old. But that same wait is 575 heart beats for the kid, but only 300 heart beats for the adult.


3

I think you're oversimplifying the problem. Think about gravitation. Take this informal example: at any point on a massive sphere, you can define "bottom" such that any massive object with weight less than that of the sphere is subject to an attractive force towards that point. The direction of the force points in the direction of the "bottom". Assuming ...


3

The limitations are of several natures: cognitive once the signal has arrived in the brain, but also physical within the eye e.g. for vision. For vision, the crucial bit is to transform changes of incoming light into an electrical signal. It is not completely elucidated. Recent research shows e.g. that for some flies, there may be a mechanical intermediate ...


3

The shift in color is caused by the proteins in your photoreceptors being used up and thus no longer being able to absorb the light. If you stare at a green wall, you're using up green sensing proteins. When you switch to a white wall you're now seeing more red and blue compared to green, and thus it appears pinkish. Your brain somewhat tricks you into ...


2

You are not completely wrong but not completely right either. Some siblings tend to think they are less similar to each other, even twins. It may or may not have scientific reason, but it has sociological reason behind it. Every people in our society want to have their own separate identity and they do not want themselves to be compared with others even with ...


2

here is forum discussing similar effect , where as similar problem which leads to double vision is single eye is called monocular Diplopia. There are two possible causes discussed in that forum. One is a cataract or an early indication of a cataract, for which a vision specialist visit is recommended. Another solution is much simpler one of the pupils is ...


2

In addition to the answers stated here, it is also important to remember that we, humans, are more guided by vision than many other animals. Therefore, the idea of separating an animal from a potential mate with glass would also inhibit other important mate selection criteria that other organisms use (calls, pheromones, nest tending, etc.).



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