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5

To explain the neurophysiological background to the existing answers I would like to add the following: The effect you are describing (pinkish appearance of white) is generally referred to as a negative after image and it is a direct reflection of the color opponency in the retina. The effect is caused by adaptation of the (in this case green) cones in the ...


3

The shift in color is caused by the proteins in your photoreceptors being used up and thus no longer being able to absorb the light. If you stare at a green wall, you're using up green sensing proteins. When you switch to a white wall you're now seeing more red and blue compared to green, and thus it appears pinkish. Your brain somewhat tricks you into ...


12

First recall that pink is white minus green, more or less. Now, your perception can be explained by adaptation: Neurons try to control their gain (amplification factor) to have roughly the same range of output. So if there's a lot of stimuli they like, they will reduce their gain, and vice versa. It can be thought of as a form of fast time-scale homeostasis ...


0

You may have the early symptoms of glaucoma. Often the red is the first colour to die off and one eye may be affected more than the other. This can progress rapidly without treatment so you should see your optometrist urgently.


1

Adaptation occurs in every sensory system. For example in vision there is the motion after effect that occurs through adaptation of visual neurons in the cortex. Also, the visual system strongly adapts to low and high lighting conditions through light and dark adaptation. The tactile system also shows substantial adaptation, as touch receptors in the skin ...



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