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There are no perfect resources for this information in the public domain quite yet. However, there are three that are making really good progress. The first is mycancergenome at Vanderbilt. They were one of the first resources to put this type of information on the web. They tend to be pretty stringent in the level of evidence and type of aberrations that go ...


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Resonating provided a good general classification scheme that could be implemented for categorizing chemotherapeutic agents. Another resource that could be used is the following: http://www.genome.jp/kegg/drug/. This is a pretty good classification of drugs based on ATC resource ...


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For many drugs, the animal cannot be slaughtered for consumption within a certain time. Here are the slaughter withdrawal periods for some common drugs when used on cattle. There are also withdrawal periods for lactating dairy cattle, but I won't list them for brevity. flunixin (NSAID) - 6 days florfenicol (antibiotic) - 36 days intramuscular, 55 days ...


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Short answer Both carbamazepine and lamotrigine are listed as Na+ channel blockers. Carbamezipine's action is mainly associated with inhibition of postsynaptic neural activity, while lamotrigine is thought to inhibit glutamate release. Given that glutamate is the principal excitatory neurotransmitter in the brain, and if you insist of using a one-liner I ...


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Yes, they both seem to affect glutamate function, by acting on Na(+) channels and thereby inhibiting glutamate release. Note that this is not my field of research though. Waldmeier et al. 1995. Similar potency of carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and lamotrigine in inhibiting the release of glutamate and other neurotransmitters. Neurology Abstract We ...


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The methodology behind homeopathy is scientific nonsense. If you dilute anything a billion times, it will have no chemical effect, not even if you shake it all the while. So no, homeopathy does nothing for cancer, or any medical condition at all. Of course plants can have active compounds in them, once scientists have identified those compounds, they can ...


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Short answer The causes of death after heroin, cocain or cannabis overdose are mainly due to cardiac and respiratory arrest, and not to neurotoxic effects. Background The cause of death after a lethal overdose of your mentioned drugs, and heroin for reference, are the following : Cocaine (lethal dose: 30 mg - 5 g via mucus membrane (EMCDDA)): ...


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The problem is the glucosepane bond is very strong, hence the molecules which would break this bond need be necessarily toxic and damaging to other molecules in the body. Glucosepane breakers already exist, but they are too toxic, and perhaps all will necessarily be that way. All hope is not lost however. Other very effective medical drugs (like clot ...


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As far as I can see this paper is being a little misleading, by saying "VPA mimics Nogo-66 receptor deletion". The action of VPA doesn't seem to be related to this receptor. It seems that blocking this receptor and applying VPA both increase plasticity, but it is like taking a car or taking a train -- entirely different modes of transport that achieve the ...


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Short anwer 'Non-competitive active site–binding inhibitors' are called mixed-type inhibitors. These inhibitors exhibit features of both competitive and non-competitive inhibitors, as they increase Km (like a competitive inhibitor) and decrease Vmax (like a non-competitive inhibitor). Background What an interesting question! In theory, a reversible ...


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This is a tough question. I was reading this paper Patrono, C., et al. "Clinical pharmacology of platelet cyclooxygenase inhibition." Circulation 72.6 (1985): 1177-1184. and they seemed t mention this paragraph in the introduction. Platelet Cycloxygenase or prostaglandin (PG) H synthase (i.e., the enzyme that converts arachidonate released from ...



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