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While I haven't found a list which is restricted to fruits, I found this page: P450 Drug interaction table. They list quite a number of substances which inhibit different isoforms of the P450 protein and also give the original references. This list gives a large number of herbals which inhibit different P450 isoenzymes. The disadvantage is that they do not ...


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Short answer: Yes. Diazepine is a ring-structure that forms the basis for the class of drugs called benzodiazepines. This class includes long acting and short acting agents. If you're actually talking about diazepam, it's one of the long acting agents, which means the half-life of the metabolite in your body (and it's detection) is long. The National ...


2

It basically means, that the body gets used to certain drugs and that you need to raise the dose to reach an effect. This is for example true for a number of anesthetics or pain medications as morphine. Permanent application leads to a down-regulation of the drug receptor (for morphin this is the mu-opiod receptor) and the activation of counteracting ...


3

Yes, in all clinical situations where you need pure vasoconstriction without heart rate acceleration (mostly valid for iv administration route). The classical example would be in the operative setting. If the patient is in a hypotensive state due to hypnotic drugs, opiates, etc. and has atherosclerosis, you will prefer a drug that will reverse the ...


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Let's review drug administration routes, and see for yourself: transdermal/ionophoric: expensive, unreliable release concentrations (which makes it expensive because of the extensive research needed for controlled release), noticeable to others ("why do you have that skin patch, mom?" Er...) Sublingual: quite similar to oral route, however absence of first ...


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Basically any compound in concentrations sufficient to saturate its metabolization machinery will show zero-order pharmacokinetics. This reflects the fact that metabolization is taking place at full speed while facing a comparatively enormous amount of substrate (just as @WYSIWYG pointed out). This effect can also be shown in vitro with pure substrate/enzyme ...


2

TeflonĀ® is a brand name for a man-made chemical known as polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) and it has been used since 1940s (discovered by DuPont Co.). Perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA, also known as C8) is another man-made chemical and it is used in the process of making Teflon and similar chemicals (known as fluorotelomers), although it is burned off during the ...


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The short answer is no, it will take forever for a drug to pass through skull bones. The usual reason to apply drugs on skin is if you want them to act right there, on the skin. Acne creams fit here. You need less drugs, you get where it is needed sooner, and you have fewer off-target effects, when compared to taking them by mouth. The brain is not "right ...



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