New answers tagged

3

I answered this implicitly in a comment to my answer to: Light and Dark Reaction of photosynthesis?. Anyway: There is no such thing as NADPH2. There is only NADP+ and NADPH. Consult Wikipedia or a reputable text such as Berg. The nicotinamide portion of NADP that undergoes oxidation and reduction is exactly the same as in NAD. The changes undergone are: ...


1

You can find two chlorophylls in most plant leaves, chlorophyll a and b. We'll use as a reference Leaf characteristics and chlorophyll concentration of Schyzolobium parahybum and Hymenaea stilbocarpa seedlings grown in different light regimes. The most important observation is that in shade-tolerant leaves, chlorophyll b dominates chlorophyll a. And the ...


1

Photosynthesis is the process of trapping sunlight and converting the energy into chemical energy which is then provided as a food source. So the sunlight is trapped through chlorophylls. This is a pigment in the organelle called the chloroplast. The upper surface of the leaf is open to sunlight where the plants have more chloroplasts containing more ...


2

But cyanobacteria do not seem to use polysaccharides in the same way as plant cells do (building materials, for example) The Calvin-Benson cycle produces glucose which is the starting material for a lot of biosynthetic pathways including that of the nucleotides (ribose from the pentose-phosphate pathway). Glycolytic intermediates are also involved in ...


1

Why do you think that the only benefit from photosynthesis is polysaccharide synthesis? Photosynthesis allows an organism to convert photons into chemical energy. That chemical energy can be stored as polysaccharides and used as a building material, but it can also just be converted into some other compound, or just used to run the organisms metabolism, ...


0

Simply put. Plant growing from sugar (both energy and material). So if they could store sugar (or even find sugar from anywhere). They could grow even there are no sunlight And photosynthesis never make plant grow immediately. It just make sugar. And plant store it. Actually many plants grow at night while eating sugar it stored on daytime Some plant store ...


1

Before answering the question, I assume that the plant is somehow getting enough O2 to survive. There can be a number of variations in the answer depending upon the more particular situation you give. You can have a look here to see a list of factors affecting rate of photosynthesis in plants. I put graphs of factors important for this question: If we ...


1

Biochemically, it appears it can, as some Algae can. The question is then whether there are any real plants who do it.


2

I can see your frustration if you meet errors such as NADPH2 but that is the price you pay for approaching as complex a subject as photosynthesis without a good biochemistry textbook. Even the on-line versions (e.g. Berg et al.) are unsatisfactory because of their layout. You will have to sit down and spend a couple of hours on the topic — all you can expect ...


2

The photolysis of water is coupled to the reduction of plastaquinone (Q) in photosystem II (PSII) as summarized in this diagram, adapted from Berg et al.: The overall reaction (which balances) is: 2 H2O + 2 Q + 4 H+ = O2 + 2 QH2 + 4 H+ But the 4 H+ on both sides of the equation are not the same. The generation of the hydrogen ions in the thylakoid lumen ...


1

Light Reaction (also known as light dependent reaction) The light reaction uses chlorophyll (which is the main photosynthetic pigment) to capture light, and then uses the light energy to make ATP and NADPH. Water is also broken apart in this process so the electrons can be extracted, yielding hydrogen ions and oxygen gas. The stimulation of chlorophyll ...


2

This is a homework question but I will answer it (forgive me moderators ;). You will get your answer from this answer: Sucrose and starch are more efficient in energy storage when compared to glucose and fructose, but starch is insoluble in water. So it can't be transported via phloem and the next choice is sucrose, being water soluble and energy ...


2

It’s not about the oxygen! This question indicates two misplaced concerns. One is with oxygen. I imagine that this is because of its importance to us as animals; however as far as photosynthesis is concerned oxygen is just a waste product. The other is with a chemical equation, which is as informative as the top line of a commercial balance sheet. One's ...


8

The reason that chlorophyll is green is because it absorbs other colors of light such as red and blue, so in a way the green light is reflected out since the pigment does not absorb it. Because life might have been purple: It is possible that the very first life form to process light may have been purple colored. This would mean it was reflecting red ...



Top 50 recent answers are included