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Based on the habitat of Algaes, a classification called "Thermophytes" can bear high temperature. The Thermophyte algaes use to grow around hot springs and can live around 70°C. Please find below the reference for all classifications and more details. http://www.yourarticlelibrary.com/biology/8-types-of-algae-classified-according-to-their-habitats/7098/ ...


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- NO,for capillary action 2 things are of importance 1) the radius of capillary tube[R] ,2)the tension force between molecules at surface of liquid [T] (for water=72.8 dynes/cm= 728 X 10^-6 N) - height to which the fluid will rise due to cap.effect, H=(2T cosα)÷(ρgR) - [ρ=density of liq,here water =1000kg/m³] - numer.=constant(for given liq) denomin.=...


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In short: yes, a plant have to have leaves to produce a fruit. Both from the evolutionary viewpoint as from the anatomical viewpoint. All the fruit producing plants belong to a group we call Anthophyta (or Magnoliophyta), meaning in greek "plants with flowers". These fruit producing plants are all descendant from ancestors that have leaves, specifically ...


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No. Cactuses Who hasn't heard of these leafless plants? But they undoubtedly do produce fruit - which is edible what's more. So the answer? No. Some plants can and do produce fruit without leaves.


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Short answer: yes. Floral parts, as petals and sepals, have stomata, and transpire just like a normal leaf or a primary stem (that is, a stem covered by epidermis, not periderm). And, besides stomatal transpiration, flowers have cuticular transpiration, like most of structures covered by epidermis. This is a SE micrography of a petal's stoma: (source: ...


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The question is a little bit dubious, because when the OP says "seed" we tend to think about the seed before germination. If you are talking strictly about the seed, it doesn't absorb from anywhere: the seed normally contains inside it all the macro and micro nutrients necessary for the first days after germination. Of course, after a while, the growing ...


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Many ions are absorbed by the plants via the action of bacterias. Fe or B for example require chelating action from microbes. P and S need to be oxidised to enter the plant as well. Source: Le sol, la Terre et les Champs - http://www.sangdelaterre.fr/index_135_151.html


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Though I don't come across graphs like these too often, I guess the answer should be A because... From the graph, it is clear that Leaf 1 has more mass than Leaf 2 after 5 hours. This means there is a lower rate of transpiration in Leaf 1, which can definitely be explained by a thicker cuticle (since the thicker the cuticle, less is the water lost). Hence ...



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