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Both have its benefits and drawbacks. The single big culture would have a bigger risk of contamination, but a bigger chance that the resistant mutated individuals are present, so in this case you would have a lower risk of complete extermination of your culture. The smaller several cultures on the other hand will let you try several dosages of the ...


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Note: This is not an area where I know the litterature well Where are many counteracting processes to consider for this question. For instance, the rate of evolution will be affected by the rate of mutation, the distribution of positive and deleterious mutations, strength of selection, whether the fitness effects are small or large, if fitness effects ...


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With very large population sizes like this the effect of genetic drift goes to zero, which is greatly simplifying. I'm also assuming selection is very strong, so that fixation times are small, and that mutation rates and population size more or less cancels out, so there are a finite number of mutations and the selection space is relatively unexplored. If ...


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Recap of the question: Looking at a single locus trait ($A$) controlled by two alleles, $A_1$ and $A_2$, the phenotypic mean is only affected by inbreeding depression, $f$ (Wright's inbreeding coefficient), if there is some degree of dominance, $d$. Why? Answer: If we take inbreeding as a higher than expected frequency of homozygotes, such that if the ...


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There are a number of things to clarify here; Fecundity is the number of offspring that is produced by an individual, and this can be separated into potential fecundity (maximum reproductive capacity) and realized fecundity (number of offspring actually produced). Realized fecundity is very similar to fertility, which is defined as the number of viable ...


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I assume that the figure comes from a section on genetic drift (since this seems likely), and it shows how the allele frequency will change over time under drift in a diploid population. So in short, each line represents the distribution of allele frequencies in different hypothetical populations, that all started with the allele frequencey p=0.5. As for ...



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