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1

There are many different ways to do this, depending on what assumptions you make on e.g. stable age structure, distribution of offspring, haploidy/diploidy, population growth etc. As you probably know, there are also two main approaches to effective population sizes, namely ones based on; 1) the rate of inbreeding ($N_{e,i}$) and 2) the increase in variance ...


1

From Conner and Hartl's A primer of ecological genetics: "Any variance in reproductive success among individuals greater than random expectations, a commonplace concurrence in natural populations, reduces effective population size." So yes, selection does reduce the effective population size and for the reason you suggest - it removes some ...


0

Hansen (2006) says (middle of page 19): A link between genetic and environmental robustness is plausible, because genetic en environmental disturbances ay often affect the same functional pathways in the organism, and any increase int he robustness has been fund in studies of RNA folding (Ancel & Fontana 2000), in the effects of heat-shock proteins ...


2

Everyone on earth shares a single most common recent ancestor around 3500 years ago (source), and given the vast depth of time between this ancestor and the human/chimp split it seems reasonable to assume that the number of ancestors derived via this route vastly outweighs all other ancestors so it makes sense to conclude that the difference in number of ...


15

A quick back-of-the-envelope answer to the number of generations that have passed since the estimated human-chimp split would be to divide the the split, approximately 7 million years ago (Langergraber et al. 2012), by the human generation time. The human generation time can be tricky to estimate, but 20 years is often used. However, the average number is ...



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