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There is one book that will perfectly suits your needs: A biologist's guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution, by Sally Otto It is a very good book that is very easy to understand and in the meantime goes pretty far (It ends with the use of diffusion equation in Evolutionary Biology). I highly recommend it. It covers: How to create a ...


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it is impossible to know the exact number so here is my gross ballpark estimate of an upper bound - i.e. the maximum number of organisms that could have lived on earth in the extreme best case scenario. in practice it is probably much less, but this is to get an idea of what kind of numbers we are dealing with. The earth's volume is about 1.08321 * 10^12 ...


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Indeed natural selection decrease variability and therefore decrease information and mutation recreate this information. You can think of a bunch of pens of different colors. If you select for the red pens you will decrease the variability in pen colors as the other colors will slowly disappear. If you allow for mutation to occur you will recreate blue and ...


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Your question leads to the field of structured population models, and I am afraid the answer is: It very much depends on the exact Leslie matrix!. The population may go extinct, may remain at stable size or may grow indefinitely (theoretically speaking), may increase in size and then go extinct, etc… This is at least true if you make the assumptions that ...


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Remi.b's answer is an excellent one, and this should be taken as a supplement to it: It's possible your simulation is correct The Lotka-Volterra equations are what is known as a deterministic model, and it describes the behavior of predator-prey systems (in a somewhat simplified fashion) in large populations. Small populations are subject to what is known ...



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