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12

The short summary is that typical TFs bind and read both strands together, as a basepair sequence. Some proteins instead recognise a site on the helix by its shape and flexibility. ssDNA-binding proteins obviously bind one strand but they do this in a non-specific manner. RNA-binding proteins recognise the sequence on a single strand by inserting ...


8

I found article in Nature: A helper phage to improve single-chain antibody presentation in phage display Experimental protocol Standard cloning procedures, determination of colony-forming units and plaque-forming units, and immunoblot after PAGE were carried out according to Sambrook et al. Construction of the packaging cell line. ...


7

16 units/mg means 16 units per milligram of protein. Many companies, including Invitrogen, define 1 unit streptavidin as the amount of streptavidin necessary to bind 1 microgram of biotin.


7

See this paper. They have studied RBP-protected sites in the entire human transcriptome by RNA-protein crosslinking followed by RNAse digestion and sequencing: PIPseq. Figure 1 of the paper shows distribution of protein protected sites in RNAs. They also correlate it with different regions of mRNA and its expression. They show number of protein protected ...


6

The answer is here, but depending on your level of comfort with the math I'm not sure how enlightening it will be. I think that the reason people tend to stick to one ligand/one receptor models is that they capture all the intuition without the tedious algebra. It's interesting that you are asking for the fraction of ligand bound to receptors ...


6

in silico modelling of anything in biology is an active field of research. It's very useful for making predictions and developing hypotheses, but any findings need to be confirmed experimentally. From the Folding@Home website: Folding@home has been a success. In 2000-2001, we folded several small and fast folding proteins with experimental validation ...


5

Just to add to Chris Stronk's answer: 1 U SAV can bind 1 ug biotin This tells you that in a 16 U/mg SAV sample, every mg of SAV will bind 16 ug of biotin. You can figure out the molar ratio from this: $16\mu g\ BIO\cdot\frac{1mol\ BIO}{244310000ug\ BIO}\cdot\frac{52800000mg\ SAV}{mol\ SAV}$ Which equals: $\frac{3.46mol\ BIO}{mol\ SAV}$ Theoretically, ...


3

The short answer is that the Edman degradation is a multi-step process. The Wikipedia page has a decent picture of the mechanism. In practice, the peptide is reacted with phenylisothiocyanate (PTH) under mildly basic conditions to give a thiourea, which is stable. The excess PTH is separated from the thiourea intermediate. The thiourea is then treated with ...


3

1) Is the attachment of zinc regarded as a type of post-translational modification? It is not really considered a post-translational modification because the zinc atom is not covalently bound to the protein. Binding to zinc is adsorption. 2) When carbonic anhydrase is denatured, is the zinc ion released in the medium? Yes, but it depends on ...


2

The sRNA mediated regulation in bacteria operates via diverse mechanisms. This case of sRNA competing with a mRNA for a protein is a passive kind of regulation. This might be good for finetuning but may not be very efficient. It is much better to actively regulate a mRNA by direct binding. Also, it will work only if the concerned protein is in limiting ...


2

Take a look at the paper by Ojasoo et al. [1] It reports the relative binding affinity for a wide variety of steroids for the AR, PR and GR. Nandrolone (19-nor testosterone) does not have any affinity for the GR, but is a potent activator of the AR. However, it does have some affinity for the progesterone receptor (does this matter for your research?). ...


2

Addition to the answer provided by Teige. Transcription factors bind to both the strands however your question also included proteins in general. DNA remains double stranded and twisted as helix most of the times; most proteins bind to both the strands as mentioned in the previous answer. However some proteins such as SSB (Single-strand binding protein) ...


1

I will try answer your question directly. How do we know if we fold it right? A. If you're interested in only the end product pf folding -- the 3D structure, then this is the subset of the folding problem called the structure prediction (from sequence alone). a. We can verify the structure experimentally by determining the 3D structures by NMR or ...


1

A certain fold of a peptide string can be validated or ruled out if other experimental data is available. Some other techniques to infer protein structure are X-ray crystallography (requires pure protein that will crystallize) and single particle analysis.


1

Katsamba PS, Park S, Laird-Offringa IA. 2002. Kinetic studies of RNA–protein interactions using surface plasmon resonance. Methods 26(2):95-104 There are many methods for studying kinetics, I only mention this one because the lab I'm in has used it for studying protein-ligand interactions. That article has a good explanation of SPR and how it works, so I ...


1

Ridgeway and coworkers designed a really neat microfluidic device for making these kinds of kinetic binding measurements on RNA and protein (Ridgeway et al. 2009). Their device works sort of like a stop-flow, and they used a FRET based scheme to detect binding and unbinding events. They took measurements for one particular rRNA/ribosomal protein pair and got ...



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