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The simple answer is that there are literally thousands of chemical reactions (mediated by enzymes) going on in the cell. Some produce H2O, others consume it. For example, when proteins are broken down into their individual amino acids as part of normal turnover in the cell, a water molecule is necessary to break the peptide bond. Therefore, the overall ...


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This is a general answer for all three of your related questions: This one How does Temperature influences the rate of protein turnover? How is the rate of transcription influenced by temperature? Since you said: I want to simulate the evolution of genetic architecture when after a sudden change in temperature or in an environment that is ...


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There are not much explanations available, as far as I can see. The best explanation that I have found is that the positive charge allows the orientation of the protein in the membrane. The orientation for membrane proteins is important as a lot of them are transporters which have a dedicated transportation direction. The same is true for receptors, which ...


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6kDa are usually enough to seperate two proteins in my experience. Try the other way, use a 7 or even 8% gel. They run longer but have a higher separation capacity. If you look at this figure from the LabFaQ, you see that you can use a higher percentage gel: The other thing are the antibodies: Where are your isoforms different? 6kDa are 55 to 60 amino ...


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The number of hydrogen bonds cannot actually be said from software only inferred. But you could try using STRIDE (http://structure.usc.edu/stride/) which takes the file name with a -h flag to output the number of hydrogen bonds. You could then write a small shell script which would pass in each file and store the data you wanted in whatever format you liked. ...



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