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0

SEAP, secreted alkaline phosphatase, and vectors engineered to express fusions to this reporter gene may be well-suited to solve your problem.


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You can always express GFP or your favorite protein in a secretory vector like pSecTag or pSecTag2 from Invitrogen/Life/ThermoFisher/SuperUltraBioMegaMart. There are probably others, but those were the first ones I came across. They contain the mouse Igκ signal sequence for efficient secretion (so the website says, I've never used it). I don't know ...


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I don't know of any that are exported by all cells, e.g. both neurons and . All blood proteins, e.g. serum albumin are exported but by specific cells.


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It would depend on the stain - and more specifically the material and staining agent. Saliva contains blood clotting agents so I doubt it would help with removing blood stains. The enzymes in saliva are unlikely to help with the stain removal. The water in saliva would be more likely to help, dissolving the stain. So your probably better off with water.


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Well you are assuming one sequenced genome/proteome per NCBI tax id. That is no longer true. So if you click on the proteome filter it decreases by half. Which gets you into the 60,000 range. Now not all of these are "different" conceptual proteins, many are artifacts from the way GenBank/EMBL/DDBJ interact with the TrEMBL section of UniProtKB i.e. they are ...


4

There are 20+ thousand genes in the genome, but each of these can produce multiple proteins. In addition to this, you have protein fragments and cleavage products further increasing the number of entries.


2

Don't be discouraged. At least in vitro, if there is ample chemical substrates (e.g. ATP) and protein A (i.e. kinase) remains active, the kinase will just keep phosphorylating its protein substrates (B alone or a mixture of B, C, D) until the substrates are depleted. Thus, all substrates will be phosphorylated eventually. The contrived Condition 1 may occur ...


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Some suggestions. For identifying function do a homology search. There is little functional annotation of lncRNAs. So homology based information can be obtained only for protein sequences. So you can try these: Check the coding potential. Find ORFs (perhaps set a minimum length cutoff). To be stringent you can also check for Kozak consensus sequences (for ...


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HGF is the ligand for Met, which is a membrane receptor involved in multiple transduction pathways. Gene ID 4233 we're looking at a single gene product for MET. If we're just reading through the wikipedia page for c-Met, when HGF binds to Met, it activates the tyrosine kinase activity of Met. Met recruits Gab1, and this complex mediates interactions with ...


4

It sounds like you have considered most of the obvious alternatives (and thank you for clarifying the question). I suppose the first question in an alternatively spliced transcript with a retained intron is whether the open reading frame of the protein is maintained. If there is a termination codon that now becomes in-frame due to the intron then the ...


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Nanodiscs are very powerful technology for membrane protein invented in Stephen Sligar's lab at the University of Illinois. A nanodisc is composed of a membrane protein, lipids and two monomers of a "scaffold protein". The most used scaffold protein is an N-terminal truncation of apolipoprotein A-1 (apoA-1), which is the primary protein component of ...


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Sometimes SwissProt annotations come from direct experimental evidence, but this is rare. It depends on the entry, but more often than not the annotation will have been obtained by some kind of sequence analysis or prediction based on sequence similarity.


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Interactions denote protein-protein interactions, which means physical association between proteins. By nature, these networks/graphs are undirected. Replication interactions (actually a not very good term) denote gene regulatory interactions that affect HIV replication. These sets also include the regulatory effects of HIV genes on host genes (and hence ...


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I want to add a book to the list that may be easier for you since it takes it from the perspective of Physics: Finkelstein & Ptitsyn, Protein Physics, Academic Press (2002). ISBN 0-12-256781-1. It covers structure, thermodynamical processes in proteins, mechanism of folding, function, a bit of bioinformatics. It is designed as a master level course in ...


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This has been studied by some of my labmates in Why is the biological hydrophobicity scale more accurate than earlier experimental hydrophobicity scales? I am not involved in their research, but here is the gist of the paper: Different scales are, as you say, developed based on different criteria. In particular, Eisenberg scale is one of the consensus ...


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Given your background (not a biologist or chemist) you would probably find the introductory material in a biochemistry "lite" textbook more accessible/useful than a hardcore text for specialists. As a co-author of a biochemistry textbook, I can tell you that there are essentially three different classes, or types of texts. Comprehensive textbooks, of ...



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