Tag Info

New answers tagged

0

If Y can be seen as the inverse or absence of X function, it sounds to me like an incoherent type 3 feed-forward loop, where A activates B B activates C A inhibits/reverses C example from literature, E.coli: fnr as A, and arcA as B, cydAB as C source: http://www.pnas.org/content/100/21/11980.long


0

The basic struture of the metabolic networks (MN) is like this: molecule1 -> molecule2, where the edges are enzymes. And the basic structure of the PPIN is like this: Protein1 - Protein2, where the edges are van der Waals forces between proteins. There are some diferences, PPIN isnt directional and MN is directional in the way of the spontaneous ...


0

Proteins interact with each other often for regulation purposes and for localization of several enzymatic reactions for increased efficiency. For example, some proteins inhibit their binding partners. Or DNA replication complex are made of bunch of proteins many of which do different jobs, but they are in complex (e.g. helicase with actual polymerase). ...


0

In short, proteins in Protein-protein interaction networks perform a function by directly interacting with one another. They may bind to one another forming permanent or momentary complexes (e.g. insulin binding to insulin receptor or the pieces of F0-F1 ATPase combining) , they may chemically modify one another (e.g. protein kinases adding a phosphate to ...


1

The lac operon contains genes which are important for the metabolization of lactose as an energy source - normally glucose is used for this purpose. Usually the operon is tighly regulated and as long as there is another source of energy it is kept in an inhibited state. The presence of lactose removes the lac repressor from the lac operon and allows the ...


0

TMHMM is a very good standard on predicting the TMHs in the first place, so it stands to reason that predicting homologues using this approach is completely viable.


3

First of all: Honey is not a byproduct of bees - it's their main and most important product which stores energy for the bee hive for the time when no flowers are available. Honey itself consists (according to the USDA database) to about 99.5% of water and sugars (82.5% sugars, 17% water). The sugars are mostly fructose and glucose, but also some other mono- ...


3

1) Is the attachment of zinc regarded as a type of post-translational modification? It is not really considered a post-translational modification because the zinc atom is not covalently bound to the protein. Binding to zinc is adsorption. 2) When carbonic anhydrase is denatured, is the zinc ion released in the medium? Yes, but it depends on ...


1

Amylase is an enzyme that breaks down starches to simpler sugars. Only living organisms can produce amylase. Animals produce only alpha-amylase. Plants, bacteria, and fungi produce both beta- and alpha- amylases. Like all proteins, the presence of amylase in food depends on if it is permanently denatured by high enough temperatures or extremes in pH. ...


1

Enter it in BLASTX. This will give you any protein sequence matches as well as likely homologues given a nucleotide sequence.


1

You might want to try searching against NR/NT database using BLAST. This way you will get to know what this sequence might be similar too. The length of the sequence is too short to code for any meaningful protein.


4

I would do this through the Reactome database. Searching for "AKT Signalling" returns, among other things, an entry for PI3K/AKT Signaling in Cancer (Homo sapiens) (REACT_147723). Clicking on that link will take you to the pathway's page, and if you click on "Disease" (under "Locations in the PathwayBrowser"), you will be shown a link to the pathway browser ...


2

The European Bioinformatics Institute (EBI) has a tool called "Quick GO", which allows you to search the Gene Ontology (GO) database using specific pathways or terms. In the "Annotation Download" section (http://www.ebi.ac.uk/QuickGO/GAnnotation) enter your search term (e.g. "AKT signalling") and "search". QuickGO will present you with the search results, ...


6

CCCEEE etc. are the secondary structural elements. The C or E usually refers to whether the residue is coiled (C) or part of a strand (E). H would be used to denote a helix. However in this case the C refers to non-strand and non-helix regions i.e looping regions rather than a coiled region (although I think this is more of a point of semantics). e or - ...


4

The energy used to catalyze the peptidyl transferase reaction is from the breakage of the bond between the amino acid in question, and the aminoacyl-tRNA it's attached to. The two reactions are coupled by the ribosome. The ribosome can then lower the entropy by positioning of the molecules (including water) in the active site as described here. So we have ...



Top 50 recent answers are included