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2

When a neurotransmitter, like serotonin, binds to it's specific receptor, the ligand-receptor complex is not phagocytosed. Picture the human cell membrane and think of the serotonin receptor like a long piece of rope that has been wound up, but is embedded inside the cell membrane forever. After the serotonin binds, the structure of the receptor changes, ...


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Generally, cold suppresses sweetness. As an example, consider soft drinks that are usually served cold: they taste sweeter when warm (like you said with your examples of drinks). Our taste receptors send a stronger signal to the brain when activated by warmer substances and so the perception of sweetness, in this case, is lessened when we consume cold food ...


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I found an article (1) which may help you understand what happened on your tongue: Light cooling from 37 to 21°C of beverages increases your sweet taste adaption, but not actual sweetness of your drink! Another article (2) states, that a certain receptor for sweet taste perception is heat-activated. So I guess there is no universal rule for any drink, you ...


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In general receptor-binding substances cause an "overflow" of your own already produced neurotransmitter. Your brain reacts by reducing the receptors. Also your own neurotransmitter production may be down-regulated by negative feedback. When you take away the "medication" afterwards, there are less receptors together with less neurotransmitter, causing ...



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