Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

14

Red blood cells are produced in the red marrow which... "is found mainly in the flat bones, such as the pelvis, sternum, cranium, ribs, vertebrae and scapulae, and in the cancellous ("spongy") material at the epiphyseal ends of long bones such as the femur and humerus." - Wikipedia So you are partly right; the femur is associated with red blood ...


8

Snails, like most molluscs, have a protein called hemocyanin dissolved directly in the hemolymph ("blood"). Hemocyanins are copper-containing metalloproteins: the binding site for a single O2 molecule contains two copper atoms. Unlike hemoglobin, where reversible oxygen binding is accomplished without a change in the oxidation state of the Fe(II) atoms in ...


7

A few components to my answer. Red blood cells do not contain a nucleus, therefore, they do not harbour DNA. The major determinant of blood compatibility is the blood antigen. There are only 4 types: O, A, B, AB. This is genetically encoded, and is expressed as a set of sugar coats on the blood cell membrane. However, the enzymes that encode for A or B ...


5

No. Nobody considers red blood cells to be prokaryotic, perhaps most importantly because they are part of a eukaryotic organism. Red blood cells begin life with the full complement of organelles, including a nucleus and mitochondria, but our RBCs shed their organelles during maturation. In actuality, though, only mammalian RBCs lack nuclei; other animals' ...


4

Well, it turns out the situation is more complex. I had assumed the answer was what rwst suggests or something to do with osmotic pressure. It seems that we don't really know that well. In a paper from 1991, Chi and Wu suggest the following possible mechanisms : Membrane fusion during the shedding of exovesicles might produce a transient decrease of the ...


4

The molecular basis of copper-transport diseases in Trends in Molecular Medicine, Volume 7, Issue 2, 1 February 2001, Pages 64–69, has a link to a 1973 paper by JM Gillespie entitled "Keratin Structure and Changes with Copper Deficiency," stating Menkes patients are often diagnosed from their unusual hair structure – termed pili torti – also known as ...


4

The model used by Jamshidi et al. can be found in the BioModels database with acession no. MODEL1103210001 http://www.ebi.ac.uk/compneur-srv/biomodels-main/MODEL1103210001 A more recent model has also been described in Bordbar et al. iAB-RBC-283: A proteomically derived knowledge-base of erythrocyte metabolism that can be used to simulate its physiological ...


3

They are recycled, the iron and other components are broken down and then absorbed. Adaptations of the RBC prevent the same RBC being used. They lack a nucleus to make them highly efficient oxygen carriers (pack as much haemoglobin as possible). Without a nucleus and other organelles they're unable to synthesise the stuff they'd need for renewal. There's a ...


2

I think the quoted answer is correct. First, the probability of getting a son( and not a daughter) is $P_s=0.5$. Next, since both the parents are heterozygous, the probability of genotype $hh$ is $P_h=0.25$. This genotype will not produce any antigen precursor, and hence there will be no antigens on RBC. As blood group O is defined by the absence of ...


2

It is critical for you to realize that one's DNA is not the determining factor when it comes to a blood transfusion. Rather, what you have to look at is the proteins being expressed by the DNA coding for blood-associated proteins, as it is these proteins that are the determinant of blood acception or rejection.In other words, the key question is whether or ...


2

Because one's DNA doesn't have to exactly match another person at all 3 billion locations for the transfusion to be successful. As it turns out, there are only a few proteins that determine whether a person's blood is a match to someone else's. And as it turns out, in the vast majority of the human population, there are only three alleles of the ABO gene, ...


2

Low density lipoproteins can be taken up by the macrophages under a number of circumstances (typically high circulating levels is the most important). These macrophages are called foam cells. The macrophage can then die and deposit this cholesterol and fatty material onto a vessel wall in the context of atherosclerosis. Additionally tissue damage as a result ...


1

The main regulatory input into erythrocyte production is hypoxia. The response to elevated CO2 levels in the blood (hypercapnia) is mainly to increase ventilation (i.e. more and/or deeper breaths) so that the excess can be "blown off". I think that some carbon dioxide could pass into the bloodstream from the stomach since gases tend to be quite good at ...


1

The neurological basis of behavior is still unclear, and the genetic basis of behavior is even less clear. What can be said is that genetics may predispose you to certain behaviors, but what the predisposing factors are, and how much they determine your behavior (and how much is due to environmental factors), is unclear. And this varies for different ...


1

Ethanol, in less than 50% concentration, emulgates lipids and, through interference with hydrogen bonds, leads to conformational changes in proteins. Higher concentrations lead to denaturation of proteins and osmolysis of cells through small defects, so they finally burst, as ethanol forces a concentration equilibrium. This is why it's a good desinfection ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible