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20

Wow, as an astrophysicist who has just logged into biology SE for the first time, I didn't think I'd have a question I could immediately answer. You are correct about the Sun's output, so what about the lion. If the lion is in its usual passive state, i.e. lying around as shown in your picture, then you would not go far wrong in treating them as black body ...


7

You can find biochemical pathways on KEGG pathway for example. KEGG PATHWAY is a collection of manually drawn pathway maps representing our knowledge on the molecular interaction and reaction networks for: 1. Metabolism Global/overview Carbohydrate Energy Lipid Nucleotide Amino acid Other amino Glycan Cofactor/vitamin ...


6

Unix and Perl to the Rescue by Keith Bradnam and Ian Korf is an excellent introductory book and guide for bioinformatics (Linux and Perl) in genomics. It includes exercises and starts with the very fundamentals. You will still need some basic understanding of genetics and biology though.


5

Where I studied, every undergrad read Campbell Biology. You can start it as a non-specialist but you will not be one at the end..


5

Quantitative descriptions of leaf shape used as diagnostics are hard to come by. There are numerous qualitative descriptions (lyrate, cordate, acicular, etc.), and I think this fits within the example you give that "the laminar shape for this species is mainly ovate." But actual quantitative ranges as you mention (e.g., that the L:W ratio of Acer lies within ...


5

There are a number of more recent papers dealing with phylogenetic methods in reconstructing language history as well, including work by Colin Renfrew and Quentin Atkinson. Here are two recent high-profile papers. Unfortunately, both are still behind paywalls, but even reading the list of papers they cite / that cite them would be a great way to answer your ...


5

Below is a Python script that might help you to get started (apologies if it fails the Pythonic test - it works!). It uses the Entrez part of the Biopython library. The script sets up a query, in this case yeast AND Saccharomyces against the pmc database. Also note that this script uses the 2 step process that NCBI likes you to use - the first part of the ...


5

The sun will win until you have enough lions to form a star sized mass. Assuming that your lions have an average mass of 200kg, which is probably pretty close, 1 trillion lions has a mass of 2×1014 kg, which is pretty close to the mass of Remus, a moon around the asteroid Sylvia. The mass of the sun is about 2×1030 kg. So your lions would have enough mass ...


5

Beginning Perl for Bioinformatics by Jim Tisdall http://shop.oreilly.com is quite good, in my opinion, and his sequel, Mastering Perl for Bioinformatics is also great. The focus is largely, but not exclusively genomics.


4

I had done some search on this before but not for CHO (I checked for the cells that I was culturing). I can look up for more. Just pasting the data that I have right now. Cell type Total G1 S G2 M S+G2/G1 Ref Neuro2a 9 2 5 1.5 0.5 3.25 De Laat et al 1980 PNAS Hela 16.2 7.7 7.2 ...


4

The model used by Jamshidi et al. can be found in the BioModels database with acession no. MODEL1103210001 http://www.ebi.ac.uk/compneur-srv/biomodels-main/MODEL1103210001 A more recent model has also been described in Bordbar et al. iAB-RBC-283: A proteomically derived knowledge-base of erythrocyte metabolism that can be used to simulate its physiological ...


4

The quote refers to 'robber' bees, but in today's terminology, there are actually three separate phenomena. "Cheating" in bees and other social animals refers to the exploitation of a social contract for one's own benefit. Example: bee workers lay their own eggs rather than tending those of the queen. "Laziness" or "inactivity" of bee or other social insect ...


4

The Campbell Biology is a good very introductory book to biology. It is popular book but a very standard text book. I am not aware of any popular and introductory book that are broad enough to encompass all of biology. I would suggest that you get the campbell and in parallel you can follow free online courseware. There are lots of them. Starting with ...


4

There is one book that will perfectly suits your needs: A biologist's guide to Mathematical Modeling in Ecology and Evolution, by Sally Otto It is a very good book that is very easy to understand and in the meantime goes pretty far (It ends with the use of diffusion equation in Evolutionary Biology). I highly recommend it. It covers: How to create a ...


4

In human cells it takes about 20 s to make a 20,000 dalton enzyme. Assuming that the cells concerned are already making mRNA for the enzyme, there will be two main factors: (1) The time taken to synthesize the polypeptide (2) Any time taken to fold the protein (If the enzyme is secreted from the cell there will also be the time taken for the protein to ...


4

Check this out. This resource lists organic cofactors and the associated enzymes. See the wikipedia page also. Many metals also serve as prosthetic groups in enzymes. They include- Magnesium, Manganese, Iron, Cobalt, Nickel, Copper, Zinc, Molybdenum. FeS clusters are also an important part in many important enzymes in mitochondria and plastids.


4

There are various types of Mushroom identification Sites. you can take help from: Mushroomexpert Rogersmushrooms MycoKey 4.0 Source: MycoKey 4.0


4

This looks like dried cholla cactus, although it will be hard to determine the species. It is sold commonly for fishtanks, so might even be found in places where it does not grow naturally if someone cleaned out their fish tank. EDIT by Ilan: on this image you can clearly see that the tree identified right:


4

The topic you describe is very interesting and known as "species selection." Some traits exist that not only affect the reproductive success of individuals, but also affect the diversification rate of the entire species, either through affecting the extinction rate, the speciation rate, or both. To give you an example, I'll summarize this paper by Goldberg ...


3

Alongwith campbell ,look up some "advanced" books - like Bruce Alberts molecular biology of The Cell , Lehninger, etc. It is not necessary to read everything in those books. Read whichever topics interest you the most. There is also a very good site : ibiomagazine.org which has videos of some of the big shots of biology. And remember, most important is ...


3

I would suggest something like "The Selfish Gene" by Richard Dawkins. It covers many examples or organisms and how their behaviour at a molecular level is ultimately selfish in order to ensure survival by passing their genes, which is perhaps the most important biological function of any living organism. However, as pointed in comments below, this book ...


3

Cofactor: coenzymes are organic molecules that are required by certain enzymes to carry out catalysis. Database: CoFactor - The organic enzyme cofactor database of EBI Examples:


3

I think it's possible with Entrez Direct You'd start with something like: esearch -db pubmed -query "atp6" And then pipe that to maybe efetch -format ?? and then continue with gnu coreutils. It might be that only abstracts are available as text, in this case, you'd have to extract e.g. pubmed ids and then come up with a way to batch fetch those somehow.. ...


3

I'm going to work this from the angle of power the animals could produce for an extended (e.g. 1 hour) time. I'll assume that a lion produces power somewhere between that of a human and a horse, since the typical weight of a lion (180 kg/400 lb-ish for males) is between that of a human (80 kg/180 lb-ish for males) and a horse (850 kg/1800 lb-ish for draft ...


3

The best resource for troubleshooting ligations I found (and use frequently) is this NEB page. That is assuming you've already referred to the instructions provided with the enzyme you're using. In my case it's T4 Ligase, again from NEB. It's helpful to check the FAQs and the references listed on that page. Also, you can make use of their Molar ...


3

Elementary Sequence Analysis by Brian Golding and Dick Morton is a good starter. Online resources can be found here:http://helix.biology.mcmaster.ca/courses.html Here's a great online tutorial for sequencing techniques, with introduction, examples and everything. http://bioinf.comav.upv.es/courses/sequence_analysis/sequencing_technologies.html


3

While not a book per se, the edX Lifesciences course has been really useful for me, it does a great job of covering the entire pipeline of genome analysis that one would need to use. The link containing all 8 classes is here, scroll down a bit and you can see links to all of the classes in this module: ...


3

I am not entirely sure what you are after, but I (as have others that commented on this question) interpret your question as "The linked chapter contains too much technical information". Quite frankly, after scanning the book chapter, I have to agree with you. Therefore I have sought for a quick overview image of all the cranial nerves including their ...


2

BioNumbers is a database that contains exactly this sort of stuff. For example, I took this from this site: Number of mitochondria per cell: Yeast Cryptococcus neoformans cell: ~34 Human HELA cell: ~6000 Mouse L cell: ~1000


2

I don't have access to Provine's book, and I can't describe the details of the hooded rat experiments, but here is an attempt to explain the importance of the work. Darwin published “Origin of Species” in 1859. He proposed that modern species were all descended from ancestral species, and that evolution proceeded by natural selection. He believed that ...



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