New answers tagged

3

This is in between an extended comment and an answer. What do you mean by "Natural"? The question makes no sense as the term "natural" isn't properly defined. (I am voting to close as unclear). For example, if you go to an area where there is "naturally" a high radioactivity, this will increase your mutation rate. Is this a natural way to change your ...


3

I think the question mainly highlight either of two misunderstandings: misunderstanding about the definition of heritability misunderstanding why the slope of the regression line is equal to heritability (in the narrow sense). Definition of heritability Please have a look at the post Why is a heritability coefficient not an index of “how genetic” ...


0

There certainly is a general trend of later reproductive age and longer lifespan. This is simply because the organisms need to live at least until their reproductive age to be able to reproduce. However, other than that I think there is no definitive correlation that animals normally live approximately eight times as long as their reproductive age (as your ...


0

I can't find a very fine writings/documents to support this or satisfy your question. I think, it's related somehow. Let's take a sample: (It's not super accurate but you can make a search) ------------------------------------------------------------ | Creature Lifespan Reproductive Age | -------------------------------------------...


2

You are correct in thinking that traits that improve (impede) ones reproductive rate should be spread through (removed from) the population by selection. However, the process of evolution rests upon more than just selection. There are four mechanisms by which evolution operates; mutation, migration, drift, and selection. Mutation brings new variation in to ...


8

Oops I wrote a lot! This is almost a very brief introduction to some concepts of population genetics. A little bit of terminology first Locus A locus (plur. loci) is a position on a chromosome. Allele At a specific locus, different individuals may have different variants. One individual might be ATTCTA while another might be ATTCAA for example. These ...


0

I am not sure if I can answer the question of why the primary oocyte gets arrested during meiosis (and finishes after fertilization), but the stage of growth the egg is arrested at does vary widely between species; it's not always primary oocyte. This might suggest that the reason is species-dependent. In sea urchins, it's the fully mature ovum that gets ...



Top 50 recent answers are included