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With many non-coding RNAs, the RNA is the functional endpoint. Therefore, ncRNA "expression" simply refers to the production of that functional component. Similarly to with proteins, this involves looking at differential tissue production of that noncoding RNA (i.e. in which tissues the RNA is produced). Gene expression is defined in the Oxford Dictionary ...


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Why DNA for the genetic material? I think the correct and sufficient answer to this is the one so frequently repeated that it is difficult to find the original source. For example, G.F.Joyce wrote in a 2002 Nature review article: The primary advantage of DNA over RNA as a genetic material is the greater chemical stability of DNA, allowing much larger ...


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RNA and proteins are not electrical systems, but the idea of translating a signal between incompatible systems can be applied here. Proteins are made through a process called Translation, where instructions stored in a piece of mRNA are used by the Ribosome to make protein. tRNAs adapt the mRNA nucleotide sequence into a protein's peptide sequence by ...


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Answers Possibly, but with such a low frequency as to be unimportant and undetectable. (Monkeys with typewriters producing Shakespeare’s Hamlet comes to mind.) No. Because it would be extremely difficult to detect, it would seem to be of no importance if it did occur at a very low frequency (you make no suggestion of why it would be of interest) and ...


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They queried publications dealing with the lncRNA that studied whether it was functional through over-expression or knockdown. Cells do something measurable in their normal state, that can be observed through microscopy, qPCR, microarray, etc. You use the data as a control which to compare experimental results against. For an over-expression study, for ...



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