Hot answers tagged

5

You call it a thought experiment but something like this has actually been done. Not entirely similar as they don't switch 2, but still they replace a codon. An overview: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expanded_genetic_code Big thing: in the two articles leading up to this one they replaced all 314 UAG stop codons in E.coli K12 and used the now unused UAG ...


3

Hasn’t your question already been answered by those organisms (and organelles) that have a different genetic code from the standard genetic code (originally known as ‘universal’)? Essentially they have performed the experiment for you by developing machinery to decode mRNA differently (transfer RNAs with appropriately different anticodon/amino-acid accepting ...


2

There are three "omic" definitions that might help you. The DNA is the long term storage of the information. You're probably familiar with this concept, and the study of this type of information is genomics. One of the major functions of DNA is it's use as the blueprint for the production of proteins. Proteins carry out all sorts of structural and ...


2

On one hand, designing an experiment which would kill (and resurrect) a cell is not possible: once a cell malfunctions, it's likely damaged beyond repair. However, other than that I don't think this experiment kind of cannot actually be done. You would just have to simultaneously expose different cultures (grown in the same conditions) to different inserted ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible