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In fact, it is rare that stop codon mutation causes translation of polyA sequence in mammalian cells because you will find another in-frame stop codon downstream. And some stop codon mutations still producing the protein stably(1). However, as WYSIWYG mentions, in the absence of alternative in-frame stop codon, mRNAs would be degraded. It is also called ...


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Yes you are correct. These mRNAs, that lack stop codon will cause translation to continue into the poly-A tail (it will result in addition of lysines not phenylalanine). Since no stop codon is present, the ribosome remains attached to the mRNA. Under these circumstances, a pathway known as non-stop decay is activated. An important protein in this pathway — ...


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No, this will not happen. mRNAs are inspected in the nucleus before they are exported into the cytoplasm (at least in eukaryotes), where transcription and translation don't happen at the same place. This ensures that no mRNAs without stop codons or premature stop codons are exported. This phenomenon is called "mRNA surveillance". mRNAs that do not pass this ...


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As to why they don't recognize RNA-DNA heteroduplexes (which are present during transcription, for example), I suspect that the methylation which protects bacterial genomic dsDNA (see the DNA modifying enzyme section of this Columbia University lecture for more info) also protects RNA-DNA hybrids, as the genomic DNA would still be methylated. Note that most ...


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In short, electrostatic forces and mechanical forces. Electrostatic forces are responsible for the classic Watson and Crick base pairing that is de facto what brings together codons and anticodons. Mechanical forces are involved in the displacement of the pairing and the shift of the RNAs. The ribosome's subunits literally grab and move both messenger and ...



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