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I think, a story about Alexis Carrel and Leonard Hayflick is appropriate here. In the beginning of 20th century a Nobel prize-winning medicist/biologist Alexis Carrel published a series of papers, claiming that growth of a culture of cells of normal somatic differentiated tissue can be maintained indefinitely without undergoing cellular senescence. This ...


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Terminology involved makes everything lie a bit. All the "immortality" and so complicate things a bit. We perceive life as life of our individual bodies. Thus if our body is immortal, that means that it is persistent, without us bothering about our individual cells. But, there isn't any distinction like that in single cell organisms where cells themselves ...


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Probably not. There's a thing called Hayflick limit, which is basically a limit of life expectancy caused by a shortening of telomeres with every cell division. And since most of our cells complete cycles more based on time (life cycle of RBC 100 days), and not due to damages to a cell, our telomeres would still shorten at the same rate. Of course the ...


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It sounds reasonable that reducing the physical stress on a body would reduce the wear and tear, and thus increase the owner's lifetime. However, it's just as reasonable that human bodies are designed to be under stress, and drastically changing the environment will harm the body in subtle and even obvious ways. For instance, some research shows that lung ...



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