Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

13

Cats and dogs can both view tv screens & monitors ... though their viewing experience is a little different to ours thanks to differences in cone structure leaving them color blind and giving low acuity. Both species have lower levels of color vision than humans. Cats see slightly more color (in the blue green and yellow end of the spectrum) than dogs ...


12

There are only three kinds of optical receptors in the eye, but more than 900 kinds of olfactory receptors. Thus you can encode pictures with the three primary colors, but there is no small set of primary scents. To transmit a smell via "primary scents", you'd have to create an artificial nose that monitors the response of each of the olfactory receptors, ...


10

A quick diagram to point out to people who may not know what Eustachian tubes are (#2). In order for the aromatic molecule to reach the olfactory bulb, it would first have to get through the Tympanic Membrane (#22) [a.k.a. - Eardrum]. The Tympanic Membrane is water/airtight unless pierced. So, while it's plausible that an aromatic molecule could travel ...


9

To quote the University of Sidney site: People often think that other people are staring at them even when they aren't research led by the University of Sydney has found. When in doubt, the human brain is more likely to tell its owner that they're under the gaze of another person, researchers from the University of Sydney and The Vision Centre ...


7

In this instance, I would say your attention has been adjusted, not your ear's ability to perceive sound. Our ears don't have a control setting or a means of adjusting incoming sound levels (though I'm certain when an ambulance with loud siren drives by, we all wish we did). What you are experiencing is a prioritization of the sound by your brain in ...


7

First of all one should tell that one can attribute the activation of certain brain zones with some indepent events only when the activation takes place along the signal input (receptors, sensory pathways towards the cortex and the sensory areas in cortex) or motor action (=output) (along the motox cortex => motor neuron => target organ). Those zones in ...


7

In expansion to biocs' excellent answer, I would like to highlight some practical limitations of this. Suppose we did manage to create a huge database of exact chemical mixtures which produce all smells recognisable by humans. You would still meet some complications: The output device (analogous to headphones or screen) would either need to be able to ...


5

Shampoo contains surfactants, chemicals which cause lipids to emulsify. The cell membrane is composed primarily of phospholipids, which are vulnerable to action by surfactants. In fact, sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS, often labelled SLS on shampoo bottles), an integral component of many shampoos is also used in the lab (albeit at substantially higher ...


5

@MCM gave a succinct and accurate description of how a healthy and "normal" person will not be able to smell via olfactory sensing trough the Eustachian tube. Here is an interesting concept in which the brain is able to confuse senses, or alternatively, use sensory input as a metaphor for interpretation via another sensory output. This is a condition known ...


4

The dog's ability to smell the world around him and to interpret these odors depends on a complicated chemical sensory system. First of all, it possesses mobile nostrils, that help to determine the direction of the smell. Then comes sniffing, the ability to disrupt the air with a regular pattern of breathing that, through laboratory testing, is structured in ...


4

This paper finds some species can detect as far as 67 meters, but the range varies between species. Note that the bats can actively change their range of detection and trade off range for resolution (low range with high speed resolution for hunting in closed, cluttered spaces or high range with low speed resolution for hunting in open spaces), as explained ...


4

Earwax, also called cerumen, is slightly acidic (1), with a pH of about 6, and acidic foods or substances taste sour. The composition of earwax, upon which its taste depends, is related to its functions. Earwax aids in cleaning and lubrication of the ear canal and has an antimicrobial effect. The antimicrobial effect is in part attributed to its acidity, ...


3

Is this possible or am I just hallucinating? Certainly possible, but I'd peg the mechanism closer to Sensitization or De-sensitization of the neurons involved so that when you finally ingest some salt the sensation is different. The sodium and chloride levels of the ingested material wouldn't have a direct effect on the level of De-/Sensitization, but ...


3

It is called a frisson, and actually, there has been a study about it, available here. The frisson is kind of the same you get from cold weather, fear, or... well, other things not suitable to discuss if not knowing how old people reading this might be. Actually, they found that this works best if you include familiarity. In their case, asking study ...


3

With regards to the similar chemicals having similar smells, it does seem that there are trends with smell association and functional group. This wiki article has a good list of compounds and their smells, and some classes definitely give similar types of smells, amines are rotting/fecal smells (hence the names putrescine and cadaverine), while esters are ...


3

Any animal using sound cannot sense color though sonar directly, though these animals are not entirely blind and can probably see colors in the infrared we can't. Even on the darkest night there is some light around and all bats use this. Old World fruit bats have colour vision, which is useful to them as they are often quite active in daytime, roosting ...


3

The short answer is that yes, they will grow back. Cats do regularly shed their whiskers and grow them back in time (reference). The thing is that if damage has been done to the root of the whisker, it may grow back in an irregular manner (reference). Wish for the best and by now I think the whisker should be back just fine.


2

Well nerve crossing or misinterpretation of nerve signal by the brain does not happen all the time. In case it happens frequently then I guess it would be Multiple Sclerosis or might be Fibromyalgia syndrome. In multiple sclerosis, the Myelin sheath surrounding neuron when gets damaged causes certain problem with nerve signal transmission to the brain. But ...


2

One olfactory acuity rating method that has found acceptance in some studies (despite the commercial-sounding name) is based on "Sniffin' Sticks," "a test of nasal chemosensory performance that is based on penlike odor-dispensing devices. It is comprised of three tests of olfactory function: tests for odor threshold, discrimination and identification. ...


2

I would guess hearing plays a part, as a powerful human sense that works in 360 degrees. Just as a hypothesis, I'd imagine that small sounds help you sense people behind you, and that this, plus chance, plus the very human capacity to see meaning in random events, gives the impression that there's a way to sense that someone not just behind you but ...


2

Maybe it serves to show others that we may be consuming something poisonous. We cry when we are sad to alert others of our distress. There may be better ways to show something is poisonous, but a child doesn't have any real way to alert who ever is feeding it that it may be poisonous. If I was feeding my baby something, and they had that reaction, I would ...


2

Music and Emotions The most difficult problem in answering the question of how music creates emotions is likely to be the fact that assignments of musical elements and emotions can never be defined clearly. The solution of this problem is the Theory of Musical Equilibration. It says that music can't convey any emotion at all, but merely volitional ...


2

According to Clinical Neurophysiology of the Vestibular System By Robert William Baloh, Vicente Honrubia, page 8, the vestibular system (animals' "accelerometer") is as old as 600 million years and is present in invertebrates. I assume (without a precise source) that this is especially important for flying insects (after all, accelerometers were engineered ...


2

It might be pretty straightforward. Common window/mirror glass is opaque to UV, so as far as the fly is concerned mirrors are just translucent surfaces. This of course leads to the question of why flies can't see window glass. Maybe the large amount of light passing through at visible frequencies makes it look like a tinted fog to the housefly? Maybe ...


1

This question has been asked in different forums and many of the answers say that there is no nociception in insects. This book, however claims that Drosophila do have heat induced nociception and is mediated by TRPA ion channels. Also, there is a gene called painless whose mutation causes loss of nociception.


1

The dog was probably freaked out by the weird costume. Humans do it all the time (I've been seeing Halloween decorations for sale since early August, which is terrifying) but we generally comprehend what's going on. Dogs may not fully understand the idea of a costume, much as a human infant might be scared by masks or beards (or the sudden removal ...


1

I think the phenomenon should be studied separately in two conditions it happens (though in one of them it only happens subjectively): When it happens outside of the peripheral vision, e.g. when your eyes closed, or someone's behind you When it happens within the peripheral vision (approximately 180), i.e. corners For the first part, I agree with ...


1

This article claims that ants do sense approaching rain and modify their activities in preparation. The claim is not sourced. This weather site also speaks of ant mound-building before a rain but frankly places it in the "some folks say" category. The AntBlog is associated with AntWeb, a large multi-university-affiliated database. The author of the linked ...


1

An article suggests that many animals and plants have an instinctual response to seasonal cues like light levels or day length (photoperiod). Also they may be influenced by circannual clocks which depend on factors like temperature, the photoperiod and the increase or decrease in food levels available. There is also some speculation that ants may be ...


1

At night several changes occur in the body due to absence of sunlight and other surrounding changes. The biological clock inside the body performs certain function in a healthy body whenever changes are sensed. There are many receptors in our body located on cell membrane. They are made up of proteins and their function is to receive information from ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible