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Sort of problematic is the "at a whim" part. Just a brief search to wikipedia on electric organs, here, we see that the electrocytes are controlled by a nucleus of pacemaker neurons. This is all unique to electric fish, and you'd have to express that whole system in a human being to elicit the same effect. You'd also have to consider how your organism is ...


4

Genetic modification of any cell to overexpress a fluorescent protein will not 'generate' light, per-say: fluorophores absorb particular wavelengths and re-emit in less energetic wavelengths, dispersing some energy as heat. (Perhaps there is some semantic choice here, but there is no transduction to light from another form of energy.) Bio-luminescence, on ...


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Yes, the fibroblasts of skin cells can quite easily be Transfected with a fluorescent gene such as GFP. Fluorescence doesn't actually produce light, the fluorescent molecule just changes the wavelength of light shining on it. Fibroblasts can also be made luminescent (light producing) by acquiring genes for firefly luciferase or aquoren from jellyfish. ...


6

Short answer Humans sense temperature differences. Background (Including edits based upon comments) Because the question is "Do humans perceive temperature or heat-flux?", I will answer the answer from a psychophysical perspective, i.e., by dealing with sensory awareness. Just as with many other sensory systems, temperature sensors in the human body ...


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Flux is defined as amount of heat transferred per unit area per unit time. Our body does not perceive heat flux. It perceives temperature and tries to adjust heat exchange mechanisms until thermal homeostasis is achieved (in all warm blooded animals). This is a feedback controlled process. If it were to measure heat flux then the body cannot sense if it ...


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This is the modified answer in response to the discussion: Facts: There are warmth and cold receptors in the body at two places: The Peripheral receptors and the Central Receptors The peripheral receptors are present in skin and the central receptors in the body core at multiple sites the notable site being the hypothalamus The Temperature receptors have ...



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