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45

A quick search on Web of Science yields "Polyphasic Wake/Sleep Episodes in the Fire Ant, Solenopsis Invicta" (Cassill et al., 2009, @Mike Taylor found an accessable copy here) as one of the first hits. The main points from the abstract: Yes, ants sleep. indicators of deep sleep: ants are non-responsive to contact by other ants and antennae are folded ...


30

The short answer is apparently yes. Studies on sleep in insects date back to papers published by Phil and Nellie Rau in 1916 and 1938. Hussaini et al. (2003) showed that sleep does affect memory formation in honey bees. They showed that retention of extinction learning is significantly reduced in bees that were sleep-deprived. More about sleep in honeybees ...


12

Based on various comments, I've expanded this answer. Though long, I cannot cover the depth of the topic of sleep but I tried to address the issues asked in the original question while broadly highlighting various aspects about sleep research. I welcome any suggestions for improvement. What is sleep? To know what it means to be awake, you must know what it ...


8

Short answer Sleep negatively impacts attention, in turn leading to decreased control of balance in challenging situations. Background Schlesinger et al. (1998) argue that under normal conditions, postural control appears to be automatic, and to require little or no attention in young, healthy adults during quiet standing with full sensory input. However, ...


7

These are called hypnic jerks, also known as hypnagogic jerks or sleep starts. They are normal part of the wake-to-sleep transition. Hypic jerks consist of non-periodic myoclonic movements, generally involving an isolated limb. The exact physiologic origin of hypic jerks is unknown. We can say that they correlate with a particular waveform on the EEG known ...


6

The short answer is: Yes. Fatal familial insomnia is a genetically passed down disease that at some random point in a carriers life will suddenly stop them from sleeping, ever, they die within 7 to 18 months I know you did not ask about the disease, but it shows (even without illegal war tests) that it will kill you eventually, even in humans. I believe ...


6

The answer is of interest not only in sleep but also the perceptions of patients under anesthesia, comatose states, etc. Our senses aren't 'dimmed' in sleep. There is no effective way to turn off our senses. The best way to explain what happens in sleep is that at some point (the last point, actually), our cognitive processing of sensations changes. That ...


5

I did a quick search and found some research in this area. Sleep inertia is the technical term for feeling groggy for a while after waking up. In a review article by Patricia Tassi, Alain Muzet (Sleep inertia. Sleep Medicine Reviews. Volume 4, Issue 4, August 2000, Pages 341–353), they define sleep inertia as Sleep inertia is a transitional state of ...


5

According to Crispim et al 2011, caloric intake late at night is correlated negatively with sleep quality: We conclude that food intake during the nocturnal period is correlated with negative effects on the sleep quality of healthy individuals. Indeed, food intake near the sleeping period (dinner and late night snack) was negatively associated with sleep ...


4

No, you cannot. Although we don't know how sleep works, we know that lack of sleep is very devastating to the body, and nothing (including laying in bed relaxed but awake) can replace it. If a rat experiences 100% lack of sleep (somebody keeps it awake all the time), this will kill it sooner than 100% lack of food would. There are no wake-until-you-die ...


4

No, this is not true. The only "organ" (if you will) that needs to "sleep" is the brain, and even then it is still quite active. The body needs to rest. When blood is needed in a prioritized manner in certain areas of the body - for example, during a marathon the muscles and the heart need more oxygen - mechanisms are in place to shunt some of the blood ...


4

When birds sleep, they do experience NREM sleep [1]. Furthermore, Kavanau (2002) concluded that NREM has evolved in warm blooded animals [2]. Birds provide a unique opportunity to evaluate current theories for the function of sleep. Like mammalian sleep, avian sleep is composed of two states, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep that ...


4

Jerk-like muscle contractions occurring while drifting off to sleep are normal and are referred to as "sleep starts" or sleep myoclonus (National Institute of Health - NINDS). Sleep Education explains the symptoms: Sleep starts usually consist of one strong jerk that affects much of the body. The arms and legs are most likely to be affected. So sleep ...


4

Upon not receiving an answer, I decided to post my own findings of symptoms I felt. 14 hours - Feeling tired. 19 hours - Feeling confused. 22 hours - Struggling to concentrate for long periods. 27 hours - Getting paranoid, continuously peering behind me. 36 hours - Going from paranoia to imagining things. 42 hours - Slightly concerned of the dark, a fear ...


4

Insomnia most certainly occurs in other animals. One interesting example is the case of insomnia in Drosophila melanogaster. In this study 3 day old male and female flies that demonstrated reduced sleep time were crossed together over 60 generations to create flies insomnia-like (ins-l) that sleep less than 60 minutes a day compared to 800 min a day in their ...


2

During sleep the cerebrospinal fluid clears out the waste products of brains cells. Sleep fragmentation or sleep deprivation can prevent this process, or reduce its efficiency. So I think the accumulation of waste products cause that you have to sleep more after sleep deprivation and extreme sleep deprivation (e.g. by fatal insomnia) can cause death. Low ...


2

Sleeping is a biological stage which we presume as a relaxation period but its really a highly functional stage for brain. Most of the memory related processing such as management of working memory and cognitive functions such as decision making, reasoning, and episodic memory are closely related with sleep. Dolphins never sleep in the sense that we do, ...


1

Sleep is an important aspect of our life. Sleep disorders are acute due to their effects in physiological and mental health of a person.Sleep occupies nearly 30% of our daily life and people were gradually decreasing the sleep time in order to adjust their busy schedule. According to the United States National Sleep Foundation, adults need to sleep 7-9 hours ...


1

My experience that it depends on it. You sleep in cycles, each cycle has about a 90 min duration. I think the quality depends on how many cycles you ended. It seems like you need to sleep more by an interruption. Sleep was recorded on 10 nights in each of seven older subjects (mean age 55) and nine younger normal subjects (mean age 22). The duration ...


1

Sleep duration certainly affects the quality of sleep, but it is nowhere near a simple correlation. It is just one of many factors, and these factors don't work in isolation. Statistically speaking, it's a multivariate model - and one which includes a differential equation, because the way sleep duration affects your sleep today depends on the sleep quality ...


1

Caffeine is the stimulant in tea. It has different effects on different people, but if you can sleep right after drinking it, it probably isn't strong enough to have long term 'refreshing effects', And yes, the duration of your sleep does matter. If you sleep for 12 hours, much more caffeine will filter out of your blood stream than after a 1 hour nap. ...



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