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41

A quick search on Web of Science yields "Polyphasic Wake/Sleep Episodes in the Fire Ant, Solenopsis Invicta" (Cassill et al., 2009, @Mike Taylor found an accessable copy here) as one of the first hits. The main points from the abstract: Yes, ants sleep. indicators of deep sleep: ants are non-responsive to contact by other ants and antennae are folded ...


29

The short answer is apparently yes. Studies on sleep in insects date back to papers published by Phil and Nellie Rau in 1916 and 1938. Hussaini et al. (2003) showed that sleep does affect memory formation in honey bees. They showed that retention of extinction learning is significantly reduced in bees that were sleep-deprived. More about sleep in honeybees ...


12

Based on various comments, I've expanded this answer. Though long, I cannot cover the depth of the topic of sleep but I tried to address the issues asked in the original question while broadly highlighting various aspects about sleep research. I welcome any suggestions for improvement. What is sleep? To know what it means to be awake, you must know what it ...


6

The short answer is: Yes. Fatal familial insomnia is a genetically passed down disease that at some random point in a carriers life will suddenly stop them from sleeping, ever, they die within 7 to 18 months I know you did not ask about the disease, but it shows (even without illegal war tests) that it will kill you eventually, even in humans. I believe ...


6

It would be better to say that they go into an inactive, low metabolic state. This low metabolic state is often driven by the temperature in the air itself; ectothermic butterflies require outside heat-energy to become active. Basically they use this time to digest their food and produce sperm/eggs. (reference). At night, or during inclement weather, most ...


6

Sneezing does not occur during REM sleep, due to REM atonia.(1) Coughing on the other hand does occur during sleep, most commonly due to sickness. The following paper describes a study on the effect of honey for treating nocturnal coughing in children: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22869830


5

Our eyelids close when we sleep probably for the obvious reason that it prevents the sclera and cornea from drying out, becoming accidentally scratched (such as blowing dust) and allowing oxygen diffusion from the inside of the eyelid (to the sclera and cornea). Fragile corneas are a requirement for our vision. Thick corneas are much less fragile but then ...


5

The answer is of interest not only in sleep but also the perceptions of patients under anesthesia, comatose states, etc. Our senses aren't 'dimmed' in sleep. There is no effective way to turn off our senses. The best way to explain what happens in sleep is that at some point (the last point, actually), our cognitive processing of sensations changes. That ...


4

No, this is not true. The only "organ" (if you will) that needs to "sleep" is the brain, and even then it is still quite active. The body needs to rest. When blood is needed in a prioritized manner in certain areas of the body - for example, during a marathon the muscles and the heart need more oxygen - mechanisms are in place to shunt some of the blood ...


4

When birds sleep, they do experience NREM sleep [1]. Furthermore, Kavanau (2002) concluded that NREM has evolved in warm blooded animals [2]. Birds provide a unique opportunity to evaluate current theories for the function of sleep. Like mammalian sleep, avian sleep is composed of two states, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and rapid eye-movement (REM) sleep that ...


4

Insomnia most certainly occurs in other animals. One interesting example is the case of insomnia in Drosophila melanogaster. In this study 3 day old male and female flies that demonstrated reduced sleep time were crossed together over 60 generations to create flies insomnia-like (ins-l) that sleep less than 60 minutes a day compared to 800 min a day in their ...


4

The medical term is "lagophthalmos" if the person is unable to close their eyes at night. There are several factors involved, and unless it's due to physical obstruction, lid archetecture (such as short lid length (due to surgery etc)), or facial nerve (CN VII) problems, it's not well understood. I have seen numerous people with varying degrees of this ...


4

Upon not receiving an answer, I decided to post my own findings of symptoms I felt. 14 hours - Feeling tired. 19 hours - Feeling confused. 22 hours - Struggling to concentrate for long periods. 27 hours - Getting paranoid, continuously peering behind me. 36 hours - Going from paranoia to imagining things. 42 hours - Slightly concerned of the dark, a fear ...


3

These symptoms have a name: Computer vision syndrome. Basically our eyes are made to look at longer distances from 1-6 meters without much accommodation. Typically computer screens are located at a much closer distance (30-50cm), which requires constant accommodation by the eye. This leads to high stress on the muscles in the eye which subsequently get ...


3

Humans have evolved for 24 hour days and our bodies would not adapt well to this short of sleep/wake cycles (whether or not they were born there, unless they have been there for many generations and have been able to evolve for the new time). Our bodies would still want to spend about the same amount of time sleeping and being awake. If we tried to adjust ...


2

Reading K&R "Principles and practice of sleep medicine" 4th edition, on page 15, under sleep onset I've noticed the following paragraph: Is "falling asleep" a unitary event? Our observations suggest that it is not. Different functions, such as sensory awareness, memory, self-consciousness, continuity of logical thought, latency of response to a ...


2

Actually, for your example it would be pretty easy to adapt. You just have a 25.5 hour day with 12.75 hours of day and 12.75 hours of night. Except you have a 4.25 hour period in the middle of the day where you stay inside and use lights (like in the evening for most people on Earth) and a 4.25 hour period at night where you make sure your eye mask is on. ...


2

During sleep the cerebrospinal fluid clears out the waste products of brains cells. Sleep fragmentation or sleep deprivation can prevent this process, or reduce its efficiency. So I think the accumulation of waste products cause that you have to sleep more after sleep deprivation and extreme sleep deprivation (e.g. by fatal insomnia) can cause death. Low ...


1

Sleeping is a biological stage which we presume as a relaxation period but its really a highly functional stage for brain. Most of the memory related processing such as management of working memory and cognitive functions such as decision making, reasoning, and episodic memory are closely related with sleep. Dolphins never sleep in the sense that we do, ...


1

Sleep is an important aspect of our life. Sleep disorders are acute due to their effects in physiological and mental health of a person.Sleep occupies nearly 30% of our daily life and people were gradually decreasing the sleep time in order to adjust their busy schedule. According to the United States National Sleep Foundation, adults need to sleep 7-9 hours ...


1

My experience that it depends on it. You sleep in cycles, each cycle has about a 90 min duration. I think the quality depends on how many cycles you ended. It seems like you need to sleep more by an interruption. Sleep was recorded on 10 nights in each of seven older subjects (mean age 55) and nine younger normal subjects (mean age 22). The duration ...


1

Sleep duration certainly affects the quality of sleep, but it is nowhere near a simple correlation. It is just one of many factors, and these factors don't work in isolation. Statistically speaking, it's a multivariate model - and one which includes a differential equation, because the way sleep duration affects your sleep today depends on the sleep quality ...


1

There's definitely something to the fact that eyes work better when they are closed periodically and don't work well when they are open constantly, but there is another angle to this topic. I think its worth adding that not all animals sleep with their eyes closed. This is because many animals only sleep with half of their brain at once. Ducks, some ...


1

Caffeine is the stimulant in tea. It has different effects on different people, but if you can sleep right after drinking it, it probably isn't strong enough to have long term 'refreshing effects', And yes, the duration of your sleep does matter. If you sleep for 12 hours, much more caffeine will filter out of your blood stream than after a 1 hour nap. ...


1

The name used frequently for this phenomenon is "Post-lunch dip". "The post-lunch dip is a real phenomenon that can occur even when the individual has had no lunch and is unaware of the time of day. This dip has its roots in human biology, and may be linked to the size of the 12-hour harmonic in the circadian system. It is certainly exacerbated by a ...



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