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Short answer Sleep negatively impacts attention, which in turn impairs balance control in cognitively challenging situations. Background Schlesinger et al. (1998) argue that under normal conditions, postural control appears to be automatic, and to require little or no attention in young, healthy adults during quiet standing with full sensory input. However, ...


7

These are called hypnic jerks, also known as hypnagogic jerks or sleep starts. They are normal part of the wake-to-sleep transition. Hypic jerks consist of non-periodic myoclonic movements, generally involving an isolated limb. The exact physiologic origin of hypic jerks is unknown. We can say that they correlate with a particular waveform on the EEG known ...


6

I did a quick search and found some research in this area. Sleep inertia is the technical term for feeling groggy for a while after waking up. In a review article by Patricia Tassi, Alain Muzet (Sleep inertia. Sleep Medicine Reviews. Volume 4, Issue 4, August 2000, Pages 341–353), they define sleep inertia as Sleep inertia is a transitional state of ...


6

The brain does not "shut down" during sleep. While not everything about sleeping is understood, we do know that certain areas in the brain remain active during sleep. There is a good overview on sleep on the website of the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke. Until the 1950s, most people thought of sleep as a passive, dormant part of ...


5

We don't actually know. But these two theories are strong candidates: Sleep 'cleans' the brain of toxins. Metabolic waste products of neural activity are cleared out of the sleeping brain at a faster rate than during the awake state. This finding suggests a mechanistic explanation for how sleep serves a restorative function, in addition to its ...


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According to Crispim et al 2011, caloric intake late at night is correlated negatively with sleep quality: We conclude that food intake during the nocturnal period is correlated with negative effects on the sleep quality of healthy individuals. Indeed, food intake near the sleeping period (dinner and late night snack) was negatively associated with sleep ...


4

Jerk-like muscle contractions occurring while drifting off to sleep are normal and are referred to as "sleep starts" or sleep myoclonus (National Institute of Health - NINDS). Sleep Education explains the symptoms: Sleep starts usually consist of one strong jerk that affects much of the body. The arms and legs are most likely to be affected. So sleep ...


4

No, you cannot. Although we don't know how sleep works, we know that lack of sleep is very devastating to the body, and nothing (including laying in bed relaxed but awake) can replace it. If a rat experiences 100% lack of sleep (somebody keeps it awake all the time), this will kill it sooner than 100% lack of food would. There are no wake-until-you-die ...


2

Let's firstly differentiate deafness - profoundly impaired ability to hear, and other states where the subjects can still hear at different degrees. Secondly, differentiate the congenital deafness & infantile hearing loss and hearing loss in adults who previously had normal hearing. The subjects with congenital and very early infantile hearing loss ...


2

Sleeping is a biological stage which we presume as a relaxation period but its really a highly functional stage for brain. Most of the memory related processing such as management of working memory and cognitive functions such as decision making, reasoning, and episodic memory are closely related with sleep. Dolphins never sleep in the sense that we do, ...


1

Sleep occurs in stages. There are three stages of non-REM sleep followed by REM sleep. Natural waking occurs during the REM stage. If your alarm goes off while you are in the middle of deep sleep, you are going to feel different from if you had woken up naturally. That's why there's a market for alarm clocks designed to wake you up during light sleep.


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Yes, when you are dreaming, brain activity increases ( called the REM phase because of the effect of the increased neural activity: rapid eye movements ). You can tell this by looking at the EEG, from witch we can state that our brain is more active and therefore is consuming more energy, making the regenerative effect of the sleeping less efficient. ...


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It's possible that they do, depending on the intensity of the dream and the amount of brain activity. For example, if the dreamer is thinking too much or is having a dream that's way too intense, the brain activity goes up and they're not as rested. However, lucid dreaming can be good for sleep if the dreamer creates a more relaxed dream. This can ...



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