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19

Almost definitely (I'm not a regular birder) European Green Woodpecker (latin name: Picus viridis) and it is native to your area according to its species distribution map. "Green woodpeckers are the largest and most colourful woodpeckers native to Britain. They are easily recognised by their laughing ‘yaffle’ call, which they use to demarcate their ...


16

First, and I cannot stress this enough, you should not go seeking out human pathogens if you don't have the appropriate equipment to handle it at the right safety level. That goes for all pathogens, even ones you might find around your house. In a professional lab, you might get samples from collaborators, clinical samples, vendor, or really an number of ...


15

It's definitely a bird pelvis (synsacrum). Based on the size (~30 cm), it came from a very large bird. Unfortunately, comparative images of bird pelves are rare on the internet. Some possibilities (large birds of Sweden possibly found on the coast): Great northern loon Golden eagle Common crane A loon skeleton (from ...


14

The plant is of Lamiaceae family and its common name is Shell Flower or Bells of Ireland. Its "scientific" aka latin name is Moluccella laevis.


13

It's probably Arbutus unedo, strawberry tree. Native to Mediterranean region and some part of western Ireland. Edit: I've just spot that you found it in California, so it's probably one of north american Arbutus species, eg. Arbutus menziesii.


13

This looks pretty much like a female zebra finch to me (the male have a more prominent feather pattern). See this picture: These birds are not native in Europe, this is correct. But it is always possible that birds escape captivity (or are released) and the live in countries where they originally not belong. I think this is the case with the zebra finch ...


13

This is probably a fly killed by the fungi Entomophthora muscae (or closely related) or maybe a Cordyceps fungus. These kinds of fungi mainly attacks insects, and you sometimes see attacks as white, swollen abdomens in flies. (Picture of common infection, from bugguide.net) These fungi are also known to change the behaviour of infected individuals, so ...


13

Looks very similar to Clathrus ruber fungus. Be careful, it is poisonous.


12

It's a larvae from a ladybird (or ladybug). Judging by the stripe pattern it is a Common Spotted Ladybird (wiki: Harmonia conformis) and from the body shape & size I'd also say 3rd instar. The one you have photographed, and the one on flickr, are larval forms of the ladybug, just like when a catepillar becomes a butterfly, the ladybugs also have a ...


12

Its definitely a True bug (Hemiptera), and based on its distinct pronotum and small head I'm guessing its a Wheel bug (Arilus cristatus). It is a common species that is also found in Indiana. They are aggresive predators and are part of the family Reduviidae also known as Assassin bugs. This is not a part of the world I know well though, and there might be ...


12

I think this is the Chinese Redbud (Cercis chinensis), see this image (from here):


12

It looks like a "Spider lily" from the Hymenocallis genus. Here is a picture of Hymenocallis caribaea from wikipedia for comparison: There are however ~65 species in the genus (according to wikipedia), and I cannot say exactly what species you have.


11

I'm not 100% sure, but I think they look like scale insects (Coccoidea). In particular it looks at bit like a hermaphrodite cottony cushion scale insect (Icerya purchasi)... The white fluffy thing underneath the insects is the ootheca (egg case). The mature insect migrates to the main trunk of its host tree and attaches to the bark. It then secretes the ...


11

It appears to be a longhorn borer beetle. A more comparable picture is found here. Are there fig trees nearby? Here you will find numerous images of Longhorn beetles.


11

Looks like the nymph of a masked hunter. They carmouflage in dust and sand.


11

It looks like the common Geranium sylvaticum (also called wood cranesbill or Mayflower), and it is at least a close relative (member of the Geranium genus). This plant is commonly found across Europe and in parts of Asia (see map below), and it is sometimes planted in gardens. It is a perennial herb that grows in many types of habitats (woods, meadows, road ...


11

I am not too sure but this seems like Polycelis sierrensis. Though it is apparent that the worm in your pictures is a tricladid planarian, I was not too sure about the species and the geographical distribution. However, from the Smithsonian list of freshwater planarians in North America, I deduced that this should be Polycelis sierrensis which is found in ...


10

Crows are omnivorous, and will eat almost anything they find or can kill. In this case the prey looks like a Yellow-Shafted Flicker.


10

This is a Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis), which is a heron in its breeding plumage. When not breeding, the bird is white. See the images for comparision: Breeding cattle egret with colored feathers. Nonbreeding cattle egret, completely white.


10

Walkingsticks, like that in your photo, belong to the insect order Phasmida (also sometimes called Phasmatodea). The species in your photo belongs to the family Pseudophasmatidae. Texas has two species documented for this family. One is Anisomorpha ferruginea, commonly called the dark walkingstick or northern two-striped walkingstick. The other species is ...


10

I have been looking into this for days, but this plant is difficult to identify without its flower. I reached out to a botanist at Dartmouth, who suggests that it is either one of two species-- a nasturtium (Tropaeoleum sp.) or a geranium (pelargonium). The leaves are what are called peltate, meaning shield-like with the stem attached directly underneath. ...


10

It is definitely a longhorn beetle (Cerambycidae), most probably from the subfamily Lamiinae (Flat-Faced Longhorns, > 10000 species worldwide). I'm however mostly familiar with longhorn beetles from northern Europe, and there might be taxa that I'm unaware of. The overall morphology (e.g. downward facing head, robust build, spined pronotum) is however very ...


10

I think its just a case bearing moth larvae (Tinea pellionella).


10

I think it looks a lot like a European Pigeon Tick (Argas reflexus). They infest pigeons and they die when infesting humans, which they only do if they are very hungry (yours looks hungry though). May also transmit diseases. Edit: It could also be an Blyborough Tick (Argas vespertilionis). They infest bats and are a little rounder in shape but look ...


10

It looks very very suggestive for Artocarpus altilis or Breadfruit tree. Another variants - Artocarpus camansi.


10

Myodocha serripes http://www.americaninsects.net/ht/myodocha-serripes.html Nice picture! Generally, the body plan of this guy indicates Hemiptera (the 'true' bugs), but the long neck is a bit strange, so a google image search for "Hemiptera + long neck' brought up this strong candidate. It looks like it's distributed in Texas, and is in fact, named for ...


9

From the pattern on the elytra (hard upper wings), it looks like you might have a beautiful male Polyphylla fullo. Compare your photos with the P. fullo in this illustration, or photos on the Wikipedia page. edit to fully respond to the comments: I suspect you're right that the antennae plates in your picture are just tightly closed up, giving a different ...


9

This is an immature "True Bug", order Hemiptera. You can tell this from the general shape of the wings, and from the big "beak", a feature of the Hemiptera. Within Hemiptera, it's possible that with those enlarged front legs, it could be an Assassin Bug, family Reduviidae.


9

This is mostly a guess and loose suggestion, since the picture is not very clear (would need to see the larvae in more detail). However, Bagworm moths (Psychidae), Case moths (Coleophoridae) and Caddisfly larvae (Trichoptera, almost exclusively aquatic) all build similar cases. They construct their cases out if silk and often include debris, pebbles and ...


9

That is a piece broken off of a sea urchin shell. Without it's spines, it's not possible for me to say which species it is.



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