Tag Info

Hot answers tagged

10

Almost definitely (I'm not a regular birder) European Green Woodpecker (latin name: Picus viridis) and it is native to your area according to its species distribution map. "Green woodpeckers are the largest and most colourful woodpeckers native to Britain. They are easily recognised by their laughing ‘yaffle’ call, which they use to demarcate their ...


10

It's probably Arbutus unedo, strawberry tree. Native to Mediterranean region and some part of western Ireland. Edit: I've just spot that you found it in California, so it's probably one of north american Arbutus species, eg. Arbutus menziesii.


9

I'm not 100% sure, but I think they look like scale insects (Coccoidea). In particular it looks at bit like a hermaphrodite cottony cushion scale insect (Icerya purchasi)... The white fluffy thing underneath the insects is the ootheca (egg case). The mature insect migrates to the main trunk of its host tree and attaches to the bark. It then secretes the ...


9

Crows are omnivorous, and will eat almost anything they find or can kill. In this case the prey looks like a Yellow-Shafted Flicker.


9

It's a larvae from a ladybird (or ladybug). Judging by the stripe pattern it is a Common Spotted Ladybird (wiki: Harmonia conformis) and from the body shape & size I'd also say 3rd instar. The one you have photographed, and the one on flickr, are larval forms of the ladybug, just like when a catepillar becomes a butterfly, the ladybugs also have a ...


8

First, and I cannot stress this enough, you should not go seeking out human pathogens if you don't have the appropriate equipment to handle it at the right safety level. That goes for all pathogens, even ones you might find around your house. In a professional lab, you might get samples from collaborators, clinical samples, vendor, or really an number of ...


7

From the pattern on the elytra (hard upper wings), it looks like you might have a beautiful male Polyphylla fullo. Compare your photos with the P. fullo in this illustration, or photos on the Wikipedia page. edit to fully respond to the comments: I suspect you're right that the antennae plates in your picture are just tightly closed up, giving a different ...


7

This is mostly a guess and loose suggestion, since the picture is not very clear (would need to see the larvae in more detail). However, Bagworm moths (Psychidae), Case moths (Coleophoridae) and Caddisfly larvae (Trichoptera, almost exclusively aquatic) all build similar cases. They construct their cases out if silk and often include debris, pebbles and ...


6

It looks indeed like a Spirogyra, or at least a member of the Zygnematales. And yes, the green things are the chloroplasts (or one long chloroplast?), and they are arranged in spiral. The "empty" space in the middle is likely the nucleus, and the darker circles within the chloroplast(s) could be the starch accumulated at the periphery of pyrenoids.


6

This is Crane fly, of the Tipulidae family. They don't bite humans, adults feed on nectar. Larvae prefer moist environments such as wet soil or decomposing vegetable matter and can consume roots and vegetation, damaging plants. Among others, bats and some Coleoptera are its predators. Further informations can be found in the Wikipedia article linked above.


6

That is a flour beetle, the two most common and likely types are the confused flour beetle and red flour beetle but to identify look at the antennae. I'd suggest it is the confused flour beetle because the antenna go from thin to fat quite gradually, though the pictures may not be good enough for that to be certain. Other commonly used names are tribolium ...


6

Nice pictures! From the back pattern, size, and antennae shape, I'd say this is very likely a Cicada Killer wasp (Sphecius speciosus), cf., for instance, this picture taken at a similar angle to yours. There are many good resources online about Cicada Killers, including this page from the MSU Extension Office, and the Wikipedia entry Sphecius speciosus. It ...


6

From the general body plan, it looks like it's probably a robber fly. Here's a page of specifically Kentucky robber flies – it's possible yours could be a Bearded Robber Fly.


6

It is a Mimosa pudica, a wonderful plant. According to wikipedia you can find it in the following places: Mimosa pudica is native to South America and Central America. It has been introduced to many other regions and is regarded as an invasive species in Tanzania, South Asia and South East Asia and many Pacific Islands. It is regarded as invasive in ...


5

It is indeed a Crane fly, superfamily Tipuloidea, which is part of two-winged insects (Diptera). There are >15000 species worldwide. Their systematics is somewhat uncertain (used to be a single family, now a superfamily). They are placed in the same suborder as mosquitoes (Nematocera). The adults feed on nectar or not at all (they do not prey on mosquitoes), ...


5

That's the exoskeleton (shed outer shell) of a young cicada, left behind when it emerged as an adult and (we can imagine) flew off somewhere to sing, and find a mate. This article on EarthSky has a nice description of the big cicada hatch this summer (2013), and also a great picture of an adult cicada emerging from the exoskeleton. However, this article and ...


5

This is a pond heron or paddy bird. The de-facto source for identifying Indian birds is Birds of the Indian Subcontinent by Richard Grimmett, Carol Inskipp and Tim Inskipp. The book is remarkably complete and contains the vast majority of species found in the Indian Subcontinent.


4

Hmmmm... the only one I can think of fitting at least in part your description would be the golden oriole (Oriolus oriolus). I say partly because it definitely is not 2-3 times a blackbird, could be slightly bigger, but on average it is the same size. Also it sounds extremely unlikely that you have spotted it in early March in Zurich, as they should be in ...


4

It looks like a passerine bird, but I can't really tell the species without seeing the whole body. As for what to do with it, your best course of action is to leave it alone. Trust me. Once placed tissue paper over a pigeon's eggs to keep them warm, and the mother crushed them when she landed on the nest because she didn't see the eggs. If there are eggs in ...


4

Likely to be a black carpet beetle larvae http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7436.html For more facts try: http://www.ipm.ucdavis.edu/PMG/PESTNOTES/pn7436.html Don't worry though, they live everywhere! Wikipedia has some info on the family of beetles that they belong to (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dermestidae). I don't think they really cause ...


4

It's a type of centipede. Based on the long legs, I would bet on something like that: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scutigera_coleoptrata Or at least a Scutigeromorpha http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scutigeromorpha#Scutigeromorpha


4

As your link suggests, it looks like a female tick of the genus Ixodus. It is likely female because the scutum or shield only covers part of the dorsal surface. E.g., which comes from Bristol University Tick ID. The translucent posterior portion may just be from light passing through. If you are able to zoom in closer on different parts, you can key out ...


4

Black soldier fly Hermetia illucens. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hermetia_illucens There is a good key to the Dipteran families here. Although it is for British families, it is very thorough.


4

There are many definitions of species - look at the wikipedia page for an overview (this is a large and tricky subject). Some hybridization is not uncommon between "proper" species (often in narrow contact zones), also with fully or partially fertile hybrids. Definitions of species in these cases often comes down to genetic similarity/dissimilarity of ...


4

These are certainly paper wasps (Vespidae) building their paper nest. Looks like a species of Ropalidia, which are known from Singapore. I know little about Ropalidia, it seems to be rather small and probably harmless, but our larger European wasps can sting and are sometimes quite aggressive.


3

I am not an ornithologist, but using identify.whatbird.com and a simple google search, this appears to be a Muscovy Duck. Try a google image search for yourself! Some of the birds pictured have more ostentatiously red or larger caruncles, but some look very similar to the birds you photographed. For example: ...


3

I am not an entomologist, I just happen to have worked on the genome of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum and this looks very similar. A quick wikipedia search turned up the amusingly named "confused flour beetle", Tribolium confusa, which looks almost exactly like what you have photographed: So, I would guess (I stress that I don't really know) ...


3

Found this image here. I've also seen references to the "closed orange ear patch" of the King Penguin, which fits with the image. So my vote is for the DK image being a King Penguin.


3

The bird needs to be left alone; that's the best help you can give it. Anything more than watching it is liable to lead to nesting failure (e.g. abandonment of the nest). The bird looks attentive and quiet, and so is most likely an adult keeping the eggs or chicks warm. The bill suggests a seed-eating bird, but there are large numbers of those (e.g. ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible