Hot answers tagged

17

After a lot of scrolling through image searches I stumbled upon the answer: this is the egg mass of some sort of horse-fly (Tabanidae). Almost identical egg mass here: http://bugguide.net/node/view/21171 I'm assuming I won't get a more specific answer than this.


17

It could be an antlion. Antlions are a group of about 2000 species that can be found all around the world (including India). Antlions mainly live in the kind of dry areas you describe and that we see in your picture. I don't think one could be more accurate and tell the genus without a picture of the individual but I might be wrong. Here is an adult antlion:...


13

As you might have noticed from its appearance, this is a red velvet mite. This is an arachnid (related to spiders) and not an insect. The red velvet mite apparently does not bite or sting (according to this website), and it is also used for medicinal purposes in India, according to this Wikipedia image, so it is unlikely to be dangerous. If you haven't ...


9

It looks very much like the Indian meal moth, Plodia interpunctella, to me. The size, morphology of the antenna and wing tips, and the pale band of scales are all fairly distinctive. (The proboscis isn't very clear in the photo below but it is in most other images you could find via Google; I just couldn't find a better one with a license allowing me to post ...


8

I would agree with you on this one - looks like a female or young male Libellula depressa (the 'broad bodied chaser') to me. It has the characteristic broad, flattened abdomen and the distinctive brown-yellow abdomen with bright yellow patches and the dark wing bases are both visible (the latter only just, to be fair). The broad abdomen differentiates it ...


6

The larvae are moth flies (Psychoda sp.) The black head, black pointed tail, clear body with grayish intestines visible and also their small size 2-3 mm can be seen on both pictures. Where they can be found in nature: In nature, moth fly larvae, Psychoda sp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) normally occur in aquatic habitats that experience intermittent ...


4

I'm going to guess this is a Lampyris noctiluca, a species of firefly commonly found in Europe. The females are flightless, glow continuously for up to 2 hours, and are commonly referred to as glowworms, per anongoodnurse's comment.


4

To me, it looks like a species of Taxus (Yew), for instance Taxus baccata. This is based on the flat needles, "flat" apparence/growth of the branches and the red berries. It's a bit hard to see what the red things are in your 3rd picture though (berries, shoots, flowers??). It should also have reddish bark where you can easily peal of loose scales. They can ...


4

It is indeed not a honey bee, but I don't think it belonges to the genus Colletes. They have a striped, not hairy body. The bee shown seems to have stripes but these are hair bands. I think this is a Mason bee, Osmia rufa (=bicornis). Osmia rufa is one of the most common bees in Northwestern Europe. Osmia rufa uses holes to lay eggs with some pollen and ...


3

I am sure it’s not a honey bee – the eyes are different. It could be a solitary bee of the genus Colletes. According to Wikipedia, their nests ... are lined with a cellophane-like plastic secretion, a true polyester, earning them the nickname polyester bees.


2

I think it's a common wolf spider, which closely resemble funnel weavers. It's almost a toss-up. I can't tell from the resolution of your photograph, but funnel weavers have spiny legs whereas the wolf has smooth legs and has a bit more of a difference in the comparative size of the abdomen to thorax. Wolf spider (coloration varies) vs. funnel weaver (in ...


2

The carapace shows the distinctive lines of Chiromantes dehaani (Kurobenkei-gani in Japanese). This species can be found quite far away from the ocean, commonly in brackish streams and rivers. The size fits your description, the width of the carapace is approximately 3-4 cm, giving the entire body roughly the same size as you observed. These crabs are also ...


2

It looks like an adult Dobsonfly (Corydalidae), where the adult males have huge pincher-like jaws. Apparently, the jaws are the result of sexual selection and, even though they look scary, males cannot use them to bite. I'm only vaguely familiar with the group though, and cannot say what species this is. (Picture from bugguide.net)


1

It is a moth and all moths and butterflies belong to the order of Lepidoptera. Based on the shape of the forewing and the orange color of the hindwings I think this moth belongs to the genus Catocala https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Catocala, see also here for some pictures. EDIT: Now we know it is from South Korea, I think we might not be able to determine ...


1

Sounds like a Curlew (Numenius arquata). http://www.british-birdsongs.uk/curlew/ https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7V25M0szqU



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible