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15

It's definitely a bird pelvis (synsacrum). Based on the size (~30 cm), it came from a very large bird. Unfortunately, comparative images of bird pelves are rare on the internet. Some possibilities (large birds of Sweden possibly found on the coast): Great northern loon Golden eagle Common crane A loon skeleton (from ...


13

Almost definitely (I'm not a regular birder) European Green Woodpecker (latin name: Picus viridis) and it is native to your area according to its species distribution map. "Green woodpeckers are the largest and most colourful woodpeckers native to Britain. They are easily recognised by their laughing ‘yaffle’ call, which they use to demarcate their ...


13

First, and I cannot stress this enough, you should not go seeking out human pathogens if you don't have the appropriate equipment to handle it at the right safety level. That goes for all pathogens, even ones you might find around your house. In a professional lab, you might get samples from collaborators, clinical samples, vendor, or really an number of ...


12

It's probably Arbutus unedo, strawberry tree. Native to Mediterranean region and some part of western Ireland. Edit: I've just spot that you found it in California, so it's probably one of north american Arbutus species, eg. Arbutus menziesii.


11

It's a larvae from a ladybird (or ladybug). Judging by the stripe pattern it is a Common Spotted Ladybird (wiki: Harmonia conformis) and from the body shape & size I'd also say 3rd instar. The one you have photographed, and the one on flickr, are larval forms of the ladybug, just like when a catepillar becomes a butterfly, the ladybugs also have a ...


11

This looks pretty much like a female zebra finch to me (the male have a more prominent feather pattern). See this picture: These birds are not native in Europe, this is correct. But it is always possible that birds escape captivity (or are released) and the live in countries where they originally not belong. I think this is the case with the zebra finch ...


10

Crows are omnivorous, and will eat almost anything they find or can kill. In this case the prey looks like a Yellow-Shafted Flicker.


10

I'm not 100% sure, but I think they look like scale insects (Coccoidea). In particular it looks at bit like a hermaphrodite cottony cushion scale insect (Icerya purchasi)... The white fluffy thing underneath the insects is the ootheca (egg case). The mature insect migrates to the main trunk of its host tree and attaches to the bark. It then secretes the ...


10

This is a Cattle Egret (Bubulcus ibis), which is a heron in its breeding plumage. When not breeding, the bird is white. See the images for comparision: Breeding cattle egret with colored feathers. Nonbreeding cattle egret, completely white.


10

Walkingsticks, like that in your photo, belong to the insect order Phasmida (also sometimes called Phasmatodea). The species in your photo belongs to the family Pseudophasmatidae. Texas has two species documented for this family. One is Anisomorpha ferruginea, commonly called the dark walkingstick or northern two-striped walkingstick. The other species is ...


8

From the pattern on the elytra (hard upper wings), it looks like you might have a beautiful male Polyphylla fullo. Compare your photos with the P. fullo in this illustration, or photos on the Wikipedia page. edit to fully respond to the comments: I suspect you're right that the antennae plates in your picture are just tightly closed up, giving a different ...


8

This is an immature "True Bug", order Hemiptera. You can tell this from the general shape of the wings, and from the big "beak", a feature of the Hemiptera. Within Hemiptera, it's possible that with those enlarged front legs, it could be an Assassin Bug, family Reduviidae.


8

Species are difficult to define. This is because they form over a gradual continuous spectrum via evolution, one species does not suddenly become two, but lineages diverge (perhaps because there is some kind of barrier - like a mountain range - in the way) eventually reaching a point where we class them as separate species. How we define species is debated ...


7

It looks indeed like a Spirogyra, or at least a member of the Zygnematales. And yes, the green things are the chloroplasts (or one long chloroplast?), and they are arranged in spiral. The "empty" space in the middle is likely the nucleus, and the darker circles within the chloroplast(s) could be the starch accumulated at the periphery of pyrenoids.


7

This is mostly a guess and loose suggestion, since the picture is not very clear (would need to see the larvae in more detail). However, Bagworm moths (Psychidae), Case moths (Coleophoridae) and Caddisfly larvae (Trichoptera, almost exclusively aquatic) all build similar cases. They construct their cases out if silk and often include debris, pebbles and ...


7

It's Echinacea. I've linked to one site but if you run an images search with Echinacea as the search term you'll see lots of examples. And here is the WP page. Supplementary Echinacea are members of the Compositae. The flower (the head) in your picture is actually made up of lots of individual smaller flowers (i.e. it is a composite flower). The petals ...


7

It's a pied version of the Rock Pigeon (Columbia livia), aka Rock Dove. According to the Cornell Lab of Ornithology, the pied variety of Rock Pigeon is one of any color that has splotches of white on the body. I think that fits your bird very well. It's not a different species, but just one of several color varieties of Rock Pigeon. If you are not familiar ...


6

Found it. It's a Sarcodes or snow plant: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sarcodes


6

It looks like a passerine bird, but I can't really tell the species without seeing the whole body. As for what to do with it, your best course of action is to leave it alone. Trust me. Once placed tissue paper over a pigeon's eggs to keep them warm, and the mother crushed them when she landed on the nest because she didn't see the eggs. If there are eggs in ...


6

It is indeed a Crane fly, superfamily Tipuloidea, which is part of two-winged insects (Diptera). There are >15000 species worldwide. Their systematics is somewhat uncertain (used to be a single family, now a superfamily). They are placed in the same suborder as mosquitoes (Nematocera). The adults feed on nectar or not at all (they do not prey on mosquitoes), ...


6

This is Crane fly, of the Tipulidae family. They don't bite humans, adults feed on nectar. Larvae prefer moist environments such as wet soil or decomposing vegetable matter and can consume roots and vegetation, damaging plants. Among others, bats and some Coleoptera are its predators. Further informations can be found in the Wikipedia article linked above.


6

I'll give it a shot, but note that I'm not entirely certain: It's a juvenile bed bug, first stage larva. The size description and the general habitus fit, as well as the white color.


6

That is a flour beetle, the two most common and likely types are the confused flour beetle and red flour beetle but to identify look at the antennae. I'd suggest it is the confused flour beetle because the antenna go from thin to fat quite gradually, though the pictures may not be good enough for that to be certain. Other commonly used names are tribolium ...


6

Nice pictures! From the back pattern, size, and antennae shape, I'd say this is very likely a Cicada Killer wasp (Sphecius speciosus), cf., for instance, this picture taken at a similar angle to yours. There are many good resources online about Cicada Killers, including this page from the MSU Extension Office, and the Wikipedia entry Sphecius speciosus. It ...


6

From the general body plan, it looks like it's probably a robber fly. Here's a page of specifically Kentucky robber flies – it's possible yours could be a Bearded Robber Fly.


6

It is a Mimosa pudica, a wonderful plant. According to wikipedia you can find it in the following places: Mimosa pudica is native to South America and Central America. It has been introduced to many other regions and is regarded as an invasive species in Tanzania, South Asia and South East Asia and many Pacific Islands. It is regarded as invasive in ...


6

This is a pond heron or paddy bird. The de-facto source for identifying Indian birds is Birds of the Indian Subcontinent by Richard Grimmett, Carol Inskipp and Tim Inskipp. The book is remarkably complete and contains the vast majority of species found in the Indian Subcontinent.


6

It sounds pretty much like a fox squirrel (or better: as masked face fox squirrel which are found in Alabama). They look like this (taken from this website): There seems to be quite some variation in terms of fur color, some animals are more greyish: Taken from here, this website also contains some additional information.


6

It isn't a butterfly, it's a saturnid moth - Samia canningi, also known as the wild eri silkworm moth. There is a good image on Flickr here, and some more information here.


6

I was first thinking of voting to close the question because it was too broad, but in reconsideration I think the answer of showing why it is too broad would constitute a proper answer in this case. First of all, the term disease is one of the most general terms for a problem in medicine. The only term that could be higher up is "medical condition." It ...



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