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18

Given the large eyes, the almost non-existent antennae, the humped back, elongated abdomen and the wings, I'd say it is a robber fly. It is one of many insects known to prey on wasps. Note the description on the linked page: This spindly piece of nastiness is a Robber Fly in the genus Diogmites. It seems that it's members of this particular genus ...


16

Yes, those are definitely eggs. And I believe that is a female grass spider (Genus: Agelenopsis). Eggs are typically laid in late summer or fall and spiderlings emerge the following spring....A female that has mated with a male can produce more than one egg sac. For some species, it’s common to see two sacs at a time, side by side, attached to a ...


9

It's an anhinga, as@kmm commented. There's nothing wrong with it; it's not deformed in any visible (to me) way. They spread their wings to dry, as they are ddarting birds that do not float on the surface of the water, but beneath it. Here's one drying itself on a turtle.


7

I think this is an Egyptian Goose (Alopochen aegyptiacus), see the image (First from the Wikipedia article, the second from here, interestingly taken in Irvine): You can see the distinctive spot around the eye and also the colored feathers on the back. Also, this bird is too big to be a duck.


6

You almost certainly mean the Tristan Thrush, Turdus eremita, which is endemic to Tristan da Cunha. The species is considered to be an opportunistic omnivorous scavenger, but their diet includes the eggs and chicks of many seabird species, as well as the adults of some smaller seabird species. The Wikipedia page for the species mentions that Tristan Thrush ...


4

I think it's a common wolf spider, which closely resemble funnel weavers. It's almost a toss-up. I can't tell from the resolution of your photograph, but funnel weavers have spiny legs whereas the wolf spider has smooth legs and has a bit more of a difference in the comparative size of the abdomen to thorax. Wolf spider (coloration varies) vs. funnel weaver ...


4

It's a cockroach nymph. Unfortunately it's barely visible given the angle of the photo, but it looks like the pronotum (head shield) has a pale margin - which, coupled with the pale markings at the sides of the tergites, makes me think this is a late-instar nymph of the Australian cockroach (Periplaneta australasiae). This looks very similar to the American ...


3

It's some sort of potter wasp/mason wasp (Eumeninae). The spiders are paralyzed and brought there as food for its larvae. Here is an example of an opened nest I found on Bugguide.net that looks similar to yours: I don't know if it's possible to say what species it is from the nest.


3

It is a male Green Darner. Pretty common in general, especially in the US.


3

Some sort of passionflower (genus Passiflora). They have very distinctive flowers. Could possibly be Passiflora miniata.


2

I didn't watch the game, but from what I've seen on the internet it was the Silver Y (Autographa gamma), drawn there by the lights while migrating http://theconversation.com/moths-expert-match-report-on-ronaldo-insect-encounter-at-euro-2016-final-62314


2

It looks to me like a male Argia fumipennis violacea


2

Like @skymningen thought, this is a Clematis. However, the only wild Clematis in the Netherlands is Clematis vitalba, that has much smaller flowers (about 2 cm diameter) see "Heukels' Flora van Nederland" (the official Dutch flora) and here. So you have photographed a plant that "escaped" from a garden. Most garden Clematis are hybrids from Chinese or ...


2

It looks like a horse-fly What is a horsfly? Horse-flies (Tabanidae) represent a family in the order of Diptera that are distributed world-wide. They are large flies that fly quickly. Adults feed on nectar while females feed on mammals blood (including humans). When they sting, it hurts much more than a mosquito! You probably want to get rid of it before ...


2

Since you suggest they come from a plant, they might be dried aphids. These insects usually feed on plant sap, and I already noticed some tiny, white, and apparently dead ones on plants. As suggested in the comments, these are actually not dead aphids, but only the cuticle they leave after moulting, or ecdysis.


1

This is a hoverfly! Specifically in the genus Helophilus. A lot of species of hoverflies exhibit Batesian mimicry of wasps/bees, as we see here, while they mainly feed on pollen and nectar. So please, don't worry about it trying to bite you. As far as species go, I think it is probably a Helophilus trivittatus. I am basing that on location and a lot on ...


1

This looks like a nymph of the American cockroach, Periplaneta americana. The nymphs differ from the adults in that they do not have wings. The egg sac (leftmost object) is approx. 8mm long. (source) (source)


1

This looks like an Aplysia, or "sea hare", a marine gastropod. Some of them sometimes get stranded and look like fat violet/green/brown blobs, around 10cm diameter. In the water, they swim slowly. I've seen some in Brittany (France) and in Algarve (Portugal).


1

I do not know what species of spider this is, but I think the white ball is actually spider poop. Unfortunately a quick search did not return many references, but here is a picture for comparison. Spiders produce uric acid, which is a near-solid and excreted out white. This is done to minimize water loss. These malpighian tubules drain into an pouch ...



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