New answers tagged

10

Though I cannot be 100% sure from the sound quality, it certainly does sound/seem like bats are making the calls you are hearing/seeing. I spent a number of years as a bat bioacoustics researcher and I came across similar sounds frequently and was able to confirm they came from foraging bats. I'll have to see if I can find any old spectrograms or ...


3

Tabanus nigrovittatus as my initial guess. "Greenhead horse fly." Source This is probably the biggest give-away for the genus Tabanus (namely the features of the veins at the wing tip, denoted R4 and R5, versus other Diptera orders), still searching out a good identification key to solidify the ID. Furthermore, also known as the salt marsh greenhead, a ...


10

This is actually not a gall as other answers have suggested. This is likely a fungus called Cedar-apple rust (Gymnosporangium juniperi-virginianae). The fungus only thrives in the presence of both Juniperus virginiana (Eastern red cedar) and apple (Malus spp.) trees. The leaf in the picture belongs to some species of the apple genus and the growths are ...


1

Just to add another option: My guess (though no more confident than @p.s.w.g's answer) is Balanophis ceylonensis (Sri Lankan Keelback) or related species. The two features that stand out to me from your photo are 1. the dotted markings on the back of the snake, and 2. the dark line running behind the snake's eye. You'll notice the keelback in this ...


0

For a more detailed answer, galls also known as cecidia are formed when a specific metamorphic stage of(usually larvae and aldut stages laying eggs) insects or mites that colonize a plant organ making it their microhabitat and food source. The insect stage normally makes use of meristematic (areas of rapid cell division) tissue where they inject cytokinins ...


0

My initial guess (knowing almost no information) is that it's a Northern saw-whet owl (Aegolius acadicus). These owls live year round in Maine but also increase in number as some migrate from Canada through Maine for winter. You can hear their advertising song here. Northern Saw-whet Owls have a distinctive too-too-too call -- an insistent series of ...


1

There are at least three possible explanations (and quite likely more): 1) You may be correct in suggesting that the OTT isn't "very coherent."* In other words, they may have a little work to do. I don't know enough about the site to offer a solid opinion. 2) The OTT may be unintentionally repeating someone else's error(s). 3) The OTT has to work with the ...


0

I live in St. Louis, MO and get this in my bathtub over time, but not in my other sinks. I actually think @Christiaan is correct here, but with a few additional observations: I don't think it's bacteria. When dry, it's not slimy, nor does it grow back quickly when wiped away. It feels much more like a mineral deposit. It was no longer pink when using a ...


4

I don't think it's an Arizona recluse. Characteristic of all recluse spiders (including the five varieties found in Arizona): Long thin legs Oval shaped abdomen 6 eyes in dyads (pairs) Uniformly colored abdoment with fine hairs No spines on legs Legs are uniformly colored Light tan to dark brown in color Distinct violin-shaped mark on on ...


2

This is a species of psocid (of the family Psocoptera, AKA booklice). Species are best differentiated by their abdominal structure and antennae. Without a better (more magnified) image and info about the OP's location, identification to species is not possible. Though its small size will definitely narrow the options. If I had to guess based on the ...


1

It's actually not a seed pod, but rather a gall (see here or here for more info about galls). Specifically, it most likely is a gall belonging to the Oak Apple Gall Wasp (Amphibolips confluenta). You can read about this species and its gall here.


1

The one on the left is a Lunate Zale Moth (Zale lunata). See Western Washington University's PNW moths page for more detailed info. The one on the right is a Forage Looper Moth (Caenurgina erechtea). See here for an image similar to the one in the question. And again take a look at Western Washington University's PNW moths page for more detailed info.



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