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3

You found a member of the stinkhorn family, The Phallales (in the family Phallacea), probably a Veiled Lady (Phallus indusiatus). (they have other names as well.) They are common in Asia, Africa, the Americas, and Australia. Don't eat them; they're attractive to dogs (lovely aroma!) and there have been dog deaths. These fungi produce a spore slime which ...


7

That is a piece broken off of a sea urchin shell. Without it's spines, it's not possible for me to say which species it is.


2

Its a Shrew skull.                                             Hainault Forest Website Photographs by © Brian Ecott


2

DNA Barcoding is a method or a protocol which, as you have already mentioned, uses genetic markers to identify species. The barcodes can be "scanned" using PCR. Now Real-Time PCR is just a quantitative version of PCR. You don't need that to look for qualitative aspects. However in a mixed sample you may be able to calculate percentage constitution of the ...


3

You've done a pretty decent job of answering your own question, but there are a few things that can be elaborated on. The general convention is to use the mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase 1 (COI) gene for barcoding animals and chloroplast genes (rbcL, matK, and trnH-psbA) for plants. The three biggest reasons for selecting these genes are 1) their ...


5

I think its just a case bearing moth larvae (Tinea pellionella).


2

That, I believe to be the larvae of an Indian Mealmoth Plodia interpunctella, but it could also be Tineola bisselliella or Tinea pellionella. It's definitely emerging from a pupa, and it's definitely a moth larva, but I'd need more information for an accurate identification. To Google images


2

First, I think it is more useful to post separate questions, at least for each taxonomic group (birds, butterflies etc). To make a question a dumping ground for all sorts of species determination pictures is a bad idea. That said, the butterflies seem to belong to the families Nymphalidae, (nr 5) and Papilionidae (Swallowtails) (nr 7), judged by overall ...


1

To answer your question as written, the best option I have for species ID is still to post to fora (such as this one), where experts (or interested amateurs like myself) can manually identify them. Computer identification, although much better nowadays, is still some way away from being able to recognise all species. 4 looks very much like a Mourning Dove ...


3

I think it's a Gordian worm or more accurately known as Spinochordodes tellinii . Good music for a parasitic event like that by the way. Nematomorpha is the phylum. If your a molecular guy, check out Spinochordodes tellinii and the WNT pathway, pretty cool stuff.



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