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0

I think this is Gypsy moth caterpiller (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lymantria_dispar_dispar)


4

It is a longhorn beetle (Cerambycidae), most certainly from the subfamily Lamiinae (flat-faced longhorns). The overall apparence with a downward-pointing face, partially divided eyes, robust build and spined pronotum fits well with Lamiinae. The beetle in you picture is very similar to species in the genus Batocera, for instance Batocera rufomaculata ...


3

Unfortunately, this is not a fossil, but a pseudofossil: a pretty deposit of iron or manganese called a dendrite.


5

It is a moth from the Sphingidae family (hawk moths). They are generally large, robust and often have lobed wings (like the one in your pictures). I'm not closely familiar with this group of insects, and not with species found in the UK, but the individual you observed is very similar to e.g. Laothoe populi (Poplar hawk moth), which is also found in the UK. ...


1

It is a "Yellow Sac Spider" for more info check this: Cheiracanthium is a genus of spiders in the Eutichuridae family. Certain species are commonly known as the "yellow sac spider".Cheiracanthium are usually pale in colour, and have an abdomen that can range from yellow to beige. Both sexes range in size from 5 to 10 mm. Some yellow sac spiders are attracted ...


2

I think it's a Robber Fly. Those are predatory.


1

The genus is Lantana, of Verbenaceae. That particular one could perhaps be L. camara. There's a number of papers that exist which study L. camara in Bangladesh, just some examples: http://link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs11676-007-0060-6 http://www.banglajol.info/index.php/BJB/article/view/1513


2

I think that your insect is a White-spotted sawyer. For more information check this: Monochamus scutellatus, commonly known as the white-spotted sawyer or spruce sawyer,is a common wood-boring beetle found throughout North America. Adults are large-bodied and black, with very long antennae; in males, they can be up to twice the body length, but in females ...


4

I think it is from Cerambycidae family, Batocera parryi -


0

Since it got bumped and no one seemed to be too clear on an identification. Based on the presence of two recurrent veins in the forewing, following identification guidelines here, I'd identify the above wasp to be a member of Ichneumonidae. The identification of the subfamily, however, is difficult without access to the wasp itself for close observation. ...


2

In this case i am going to agree with AliceD, because I live in Greece and here we hear cicadas everywhere. But in Madrid, there is a other kind of cicada that its "song" is more noisy and more deep.In this video you can hear how your cicada sings.https://youtu.be/mah26og11ms


2

As suggested by AliceD, it does indeed appear to be some kind of cicada. I went down the river and heard one calling, unusually far from the river (30m) where there are lower, newly planted trees. I was able to approach it and take this photo which unfortunately isn't very good. It's possible that it's even the same species as the video I added to the ...


3

The Evaniidae, also known as the ensign wasps or hatchet wasps


1

This could be one possibility, two others would be: Scoliopteryx libatrix (The Herald (moth)), see this image (from here, contains additional information in german): Orthosia cerasi (Common Quaker) would also fit, see here (from here, contains additional information in german):


3

I think this is a Canistel (Pouteria campechiana): The fruit are yellow when when ripe, but the form and also the leaves look very similar. The fruit are edible raw, you can find some more information here.


4

It is of Phytolacca genus plant which could be toxic for mammals, DO NOT eat as is - it should be cooked properly to be usable/edible (the older, the more toxic leaves are). Phytolacca acinosa:


5

While Ilan's answer has already covered the identification, here are a couple of other techniques which can be used to identify such animals in the future (or at least narrow down the scope of possibilities): 1: The upper left hand corner of the image depicts a fin which has multiple bony protrusions. This is an identifying feature of the Actinopterygii, ...


6

This is the Sarcastic fringehead fish (Neoclinus blanchardi). [Source2]


5

I can't tell how big your spider is. :( But I agree, it's probably not a wolf spider. (The fourth pair of legs is the longest in the wolf spider I think it might be a fishing spider (Dolomedes tenebrosus). They do hang out in man made structures and are the most common fishing spiders found. Fishing spiders are similar to the larger wolf spiders in ...


6

Yes, it is a skipper (family Hesperiidae) and very similar to European species in Ochlodes, and my guess is that it belongs to one of the North American species in this genus. For instance, it is very similar to Ochlodes sylvanoides (also called Woodland Skipper), which is common in the western parts of the US. However, I'm not familiar with North American ...



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