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1

The larvae are moth flies (Psychoda sp.) The black head, black pointed tail, clear body with grayish intestines visible and also their small size 2-3 mm can be seen on both pictures. Where they can be found in nature: In nature, moth fly larvae, Psychoda sp. (Diptera: Psychodidae) normally occur in aquatic habitats that experience intermittent ...


0

These are moth fly larvae (Psychodidae). They live in sinks, bathtubs etc. See http://bugguide.net/node/view/201443/bgimage


2

It's just a variant of kale, part of the genus Brassica. I think you'd call this particular variant redbor or purple, bluntly, but you could go further because kale is often classified by the type of leaf. So in your picture, curly 'redbor' or 'purple' kale. This is your specific name: Brassica oleracea Acephala Group. (just sort of look at wikipedia)


2

This is a moss of the genus polytrichum, most likely it is P. commune or P. formosum


5

It looks like a Red Campion, which is native to northern and central Europe. It would be nice to see a close-up of the calyx (which is usually striped) and the leaves to be sure; it may be a cross between a White and Red Campion. There are many members of the genus, and many look alike. Your close-up is of a male flower (anthers only). The plants are ...


2

Looks kind of like a species in the genus Silene. Interesting group, I believe some species in this group are dioecious and have sex chromosomes.


2

I think this is Coprinellus disseminatus, also known as "Fairy Inkcap". Size (they are pretty small) and also the color fits pretty well. See the image from the Wikipedia: Some more information can be found here.


6

It's difficult because the image quality is low, but there are some key features that can be made out which suggest it to be a Western Coachwhip, or "Whip snake", Masticophis flagellum testaceus. There is not a huge number of species in New Mexico, and most have quite clearly different patterns and coloration, which brings it down to just a couple of ...


4

It looks like it's the other way around to me. More likely a member of Auchenorrhyncha, which includes cicadas and leafhoppers. I say this judging from the leg structure, abdomen shape, and the eyes. It is however missing wings... perhaps they were removed by another organism? It somewhat looks like Philaenus spumarius, the "meadow froghopper" which is ...


0

In addition to what Ham Radio suggested, checking out Galaxy might not be a bad idea for doing any sort of computation/analysis that would otherwise have to be done on the command line. In particular, check out tools for sequence alignment (BWA and Bowtie), genome assembly (Velvet, Spades, IDBA-UD), and variant analysis (Freebayes, Mpileup, GATK). Good luck! ...


1

You can use BLAST or NCBI resources to do an analysis of something like the duplication of a gene in the HIV virus, for example. If you're looking for a place to start, I would recommend just learning the NCBI database resources.


6

Perhaps it was a species of velvet ant (a type of wasp from the genus Dasymutilla). The females lack wings, and it appears like what you describe and vaguely see in your image. Here are some photos: Photo 1 Source Photo 2/Information Source


5

I am pretty sure that it is a moldy core rot which would be caused by a fungus that infects the apple during the flowering stage. The fungi is also referred to as "apple fuzz". From SF Gate fungus sometimes does enter apples at the blossom end and damage the core, especially if weather is wet, a condition called "moldy core," From ...


1

It is, as stated by @rg255 a seed. The seed itself is the small brownish thing. The white hairs are attached to make the seed fly with the wind. Looking at the seed and the hairs, I think the seed belongs to the daisy and dandelion familie asteracae/compositae.


2

This seems to be a species of the genus Pyrrhocoris, most probably the firebug Pyrrhocoris apterus. Its quite common in Europe, but according to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility there are also some occurrences in the US.


5

It looks like a squash bug to me (Pyrrhocoris apterus). If not apterus, I'd say it is at least in the Pyrrhocoridae family. Note, they must not but confounded with Corizus hyoscyami. Here is a picture of Pyrrhocoris apterus: Pyrrhocoris apterus have a very broad range covering a big part of Eurasia, from France to China. Is it where you found it?


2

I'm going to answer this question and close it. Based on the location, the environment, its appearance and behavior, I'm 90% sure that this creature was a Stiletto Fly (Therevid) larva. Most likely an Acrosathe sp., as those tend to be very common in the area. Thanks to all for your help in clarifying and narrowing it down for me.


4

We called those "Indian strawberries". They are also known as Mock Strawberry (Duchesnea indica). Survivalists are pretty familiar with this plant. They are a lot like strawberries in appearance, but the berry is rounder, not pointed, and held upright (they point up) on the stem, not pending. Though the berries are edible, they don't have much flavor at ...


3

That is a European Millipede. I found this picture by searching European Millipede. Obviously there are different types - and this is the one you have. Here is a wiki link I found: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cylindroiulus I think your specifically is a Cylindroiulus britannicus .


1

It could be booklice (Psocoptera), but the picture is a bit unclear. Booklice are harmless, but could indicate moist conditions and/or mold in the building (see first link for more on their biology). Termites are generally at least twice as large as booklice (>4mm), and the size you indice rather points to booklice. Here is an example of what booklice ...


23

It looks as though it has a keel along it's back (the area behind the mantle shield.) If so (and I think it is), it would be a keelback slug, the coloration strongly suggesting a leopard slug (Limax maximus): Coloration varies but the general pattern is a spotted spotted mantle sheild about a third of its length in size, with a striped tail. The major ...


2

Based on the overall apparence and the distinctive metallic patches on the wings it looks like a moth from the subfamily Plusiinae (Looper moths). I'm not familiar with North American moths, but after a quick check at species found there Megalographa biloba (Bilobed looper moth) seems likely, and this species is also found in California. (picture from ...


3

Based on the image of the moth, I think this is a Painted Tiger Moth (Arachnis picta). See the image of the moth from the Wikipedia (you can even see the yellow color at the head region): An image of the caterpillar can be found here, but this is less decisive. It also fits with the geographic location where you found the moth, see here.


8

If you do a Google Image search with the picture in the question, you'll see the screenshot is from the 2000 movie The Patriot starring Mel Gibson. The movie's filming locations were mainly scattered around South Carolina, on the southern East Coast of the United States. I've spent a lot of time in the region, and the gray-ish fluffy stuff hanging off the ...


3

This looks like a Red Wag Platy (Xiphophorus maculatus). Apparently it is a common tropical aquarium fish. Wikipedia does not show a picture of this variant. However a google image search with this will return the images of fish that you have shown.


3

I believe it is a Red Wag Platy (Xiphophorus maculatus)



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