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3

Yes, it is a skipper (family Hesperiidae) and very similar to European species in Ochlodes, and my guess is that it belongs to one of the North American species in this genus. For instance, it is very similar to Ochlodes sylvanoides (also called Woodland Skipper), which is common in the western parts of the US. However, I'm not familiar with North American ...


6

It appears to me to be a Night Blooming Cereus: We had one in our greenhouse in Botany. It rarely bloomed, and the bloom was wilted by mid-morning. Night-blooming cereus is the common name referring to a large number of flowering ceroid cacti that bloom at night. The flowers are short lived, and some of these species, such as Selenicereus ...


2

The silver-studded blue is frequently found feeding on this plant, cross-leaved heath. There are good numbers of this species to be found on the heaths of Dorset in July and I would suggest that this is certainly silver-studded blue.


8

Let's take a look at the magnified body of the insect (it is a nymphe btw) - we can see 2 brown dots one above the other along the body line. This pattern is very suggestive to Chelinidea species (the most common is Chelinidea vittiger aequoris): I stop my search at Coreidae family, because multiple species (a lot of bugs actually) of this family have ...


7

I know nothing about lizards, but this looks like a Carolina anole (Anolis carolinensis), also known as a green anole. Apparently they can change colour:


6

Looks similar to a Rusty Tussock Moth (Orgyia antiqua) caterpillar, but you might want to check the bugguide page for the species, or submit your photo there for a second opinion.


3

No, I don't think it looks like Heracleum sosnowskyi. To me, the plant in your pictures looks similar to Angelica sylvestris (which is common in Poland), but there are many species in Apiaceae with a similar apparence and I'm not familiar with all of them. Species in the Heracleum genus has leafs that are "lobed" and all leaflets aren't as separated as the ...


2

I'd say it's an imposter, but depending on the stage of it's life cycle, characteristics may differ. The following webpage lists identifying factors for giant hogweed, as well as some plants that may be mistaken for it (but of course, they aren't). The lack of purple splotches and white hairs around the stalk bases, and leaves are signaling to me that this ...


8

It looks very similar to Cephalaria gigantea.


4

It looks a lot like Queen Anne's Lace, but yellow and with more slender leaves. I believe it's Sweet Fennel (Foeniculum vulgare). It's in the Apiaceae family, which has a lot of edibles: carrots, parsley, fennel, anise, caraway, celery, chervil, cicely, cilantro, cumin, dill, parsnips and more. Black swallowtail butterflies lay their eggs on this, so often ...


4

I think it is Aspergillus niger: On the second place I'd suggest Black Mold disease caused by Alternaria species.


3

Looks like a house spider (Tegenaria domestica)


1

It's a nettle (genus Urtica). The one on your photo really looks like the one I'm used to see in France: Urtica dioica. I read in herbal lore books that the sting of the nettle could be appeased by rubbing it with Plantago leafs. But that might just be placebo effect. See also this section of the wikipedia page.


5

I think it is a common stinging nettle, Urtica dioica. It is a native to Europe, Asia, northern Africa, and western North America and is the best-known member of the nettle genus Urtica. As commented by others, your geographical location would be helpful to obtain a more accurate identification. Like other stinging nettles, it is unpleasant to the touch, ...


12

It looks like a "Spider lily" from the Hymenocallis genus. Here is a picture of Hymenocallis caribaea from wikipedia for comparison: There are however ~65 species in the genus (according to wikipedia), and I cannot say exactly what species you have.


0

They could be halictid bees, possibly Agapostemon splendens. Yours looks very similar to this picture (by Bob Peterson) Compare also with this one on bugguide and to the pictures of Agapostemon species in this National Geographic article. Compare the metallic head and thorax (that's the middle segment), the striped abdomen (the last segment), the ...


5

It's a mallow. The leaves - they look like maple leaves - and the flower are identical. Mallows are from the family Malvaceae, which includes food plants (okra, cocoa beans, kola nut), economic plants (cotton), and ornamentals (e.g. hibiscus) One species of this family (Althaea officinalis) is actually the original ingredient to make marshmallows. I'm ...


7

These little creatures look a lot like White-margined Burrowing Bug or Sehirus cinctus nymphs. Very interesting thing about the Sehirus cinctus is their brooding behavior. The female watches the eggs and even feeds the young for a few days. Have a look around. You might see it. AFAIK they don't harm your plants. More info: ...


5

The overall shape appears to match that of a flatworm or planarian, but those don't have eyestalks. Also, in the images you posted, none of the worms appear to have the characteristic eyespots of a flatworm, although they DO look planarian-like in some photos: If they didn't look so thin, I'd say they were common garden slugs. We get them all the time ...


11

I am not too sure but this seems like Polycelis sierrensis. Though it is apparent that the worm in your pictures is a tricladid planarian, I was not too sure about the species and the geographical distribution. However, from the Smithsonian list of freshwater planarians in North America, I deduced that this should be Polycelis sierrensis which is found in ...


3

Their capacity to elongate / contract and their two head lobes make me think they are Planarians. The two points on their heads must be their eyes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simple_eye_in_invertebrates#Ocelli_or_eye_spots



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