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3

I'm going to guess it's an Plinthocoelium suaveolens, based on the image found here, which I show below: I found this link through a Texas beetle page here and is the best I can do from the image provided.


4

The tree in question belongs to the Araucariaceae family, There are multiple species of Genus Araucaria, I'd place Araucaria araucana on the first place, but there are multiple others: Araucaria araucana Araucaria luxurians Araucaria columnaris Araucaria subulata


6

Yes, this looks like Apis mellifera, which is also one of the most common bees you'll run into. If you have other pictures, you could check the identification tips at the bugguide page for the species. As a side note, in general to really confirm an identification a specialist would need to see a collected specimen (that is, a live or pinned bee) as the ...


1

This animal is moth larva. The images presented are blurry, but if there are no any dots on the larva my first suggestion is: pantry/Indian meal moth larvae - "They are a common grain-feeding pest found around the world, feeding on cereals and similar products." (picture source)


6

That jumping spider is a Jumping Spider! (That is, family Salticidae, commonly called Jumping Spiders). There's a lot of diversity in the family, but your pictures look similar to the Zebra Jumping Spider.


4

Looks like a scarab beetle (Coleoptera, Scarabaeidae). Species is difficult to tell without better pictures, but perhaps Scarabaeus typhon? Edit: OP has IDed in comment as Scarabaeus jalof


7

Actually, the animal is not a caterpillar but larva. The species is Abia lonicerae Sawfly, discovered by Linnaeus 1758. (Another picture)


7

Looks like a Hyoscyamus niger also called stinking nightshade.


7

It's a bit early yet, but it looks very much like a weed known in my area as "cleavers" or "clingweed" (Galium aparine) because of it's tiny stiff hairs which make it catch and cling to clothing. The picture below is for a fully mature plant, which is stiffer and stickier than when they first sprout. Note the whorl arrangement of (usually six) leaves, with ...


6

That is a kind of honeysuckle. The picture below is for Japanese honeysuckle (Lonicera japonica), but your specimen is different in the way the flowers are arranged and that the distal-most paired leaves are clasping the stem. It might be Lionicera periclymenum, or Lonicera etrusca (there are about 150 species of honeysuckle); L. etrusca is pictured below ...


4

I totally agree with skymningen, definitely a cockchafer


8

This does not look like a red flour beetle, but more like some species of Melolontha, possibly a cockchafer. For more specific information, we would need to know, where your back garden is and maybe something to scale the bug. I would go for Melolontha melolontha, the common cockchafer. Of the two other european species of Melolontha, M. hippocastani usually ...


7

Those are known as Rhododendrons, and I'd ID that one as R. hodgsonii.


1

For me it looks like an inchworms which are the larvae of geometer moth or Geometridae. By your picture it is almost impossible to see of which type it is. I took picture of one in Switzerland (but likely not the same as yours). Full resolution here: https://flic.kr/p/utFsiU


9

My initial impression is Libellula quadrimaculata, which is a common and very widespread species (North America, Europe, Asia at least). This is based on the relatively wide and flat abdomen (hard to judge due to the angle though), which suggests Libellula, brown/golden colour and a brownish wingbase. The main problem I have with the pictures (which makes my ...


8

As @Ilan wrote, this is a Cantharidae but most probably Cantharis fusca, which is very common species in northern Europe. Cantharis rustica is similar but has reddish femurs and the black spot is more centered on the pronotum. It is not C. lecontei, which is a North American species. If you go looking at flowers of Anthriscus sylvestris for an hour or two, ...


6

The beetle resembles Soldier beetle, especially Cantharis lecontei Soldier Beetles (Cantharidae) » Cantharinae » Cantharini » Cantharis


14

The plant is of Lamiaceae family and its common name is Shell Flower or Bells of Ireland. Its "scientific" aka latin name is Moluccella laevis.


1

The latin name for this animal is Leiobunum rotundum and Nelima fuscifrons, order Opiliones. examples: link


4

MY guess would be Centranthus ruber coccineus, also known as red valerian. See this picture (from here):


0

Could be pink allium, considering the thickness of the stem?


8

As @dd3 stated, it's a spiny (or prickly) sow thistle. It's an annual common in most of the US. The leaf itself does not have a stem, and if you break the central stalk, it should be hollow and there should be a milky exudate. The plant spreads by fluffy seeds produced from a small dandelion-like flower. If you pick it while young, it won't hurt (as much); ...


2

The mushroom suggestive for one of the inki ones of Coprinus family, especially Coprinus comatus. The black color can be very intensive in some stage of their development, since it is a part of the spread mechanism. "Members of the genus Coprinus have been collectively known as the "inky caps" because of the curious character of autodeliquescence of their ...



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