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10

It's definitely a bird pelvis (synsacrum). Based on the size (~30 cm), it came from a very large bird. Unfortunately, comparative images of bird pelves are rare on the internet. Some possibilities (large birds of Sweden possibly found on the coast): Great northern loon Golden eagle Common crane A loon skeleton (from ...


3

As @skymnige said it is definitely Black garden ant (Lasius niger)


3

It is probably Daddy Longlegs (Leiobunum vittatum) this invert color image show the resemblance. Source: http://www.insectidentification.org/insect-description.asp?identification=Eastern-Harvestman http://bugguide.net/node/view/840130 Might be eating a cockroach: UPDATE: OR It might be Mitopus morio(modern harvestman)


3

Actually I took photoshop to help me find this little guy, Ensign Wasp(Evaniidae) Google Images: My Photoshop research:


2

From a study titled "Production of Penicillin by Fungi Growing on Food Products: Identification of a Complete Penicillin Gene Cluster in Penicillium griseofulvum and a Truncated Cluster in Penicillium verrucosum", moulds on food items were analyzed for fungi that could produce penicillin. The conclusion drawn was Among different fungal species belonging ...


2

It look like Callobius severus to me.


2

It's look like Sac Spider (Clubiona lutescens) to me. Source: http://ednieuw.home.xs4all.nl/Spiders/Clubionidae/Clubionidae.htm


4

I think it's an Vipera Aspis. from wikipedia: The dorsal markings vary strongly, but only rarely take the form of a clear zigzag, as in V. berus. Your Snake in Maximum RGB Color (Broken ZigZag) Vipera Aspis from Google Image


1

I can't be certain, but it is probably the pupal shell of a crane fly (daddy longlegs, Tipula palidosa). Here is an image to compare, and you can find lots more with a Google image search. In the UK at least, these are colloquially referred to as leatherjackets and if you find one in soil before the adult has emerged it will often twitch.


2

This may be what you are searching for: It's actually a male purseweb spider (Atypus affinis), the color fades to black, eventually. Source: http://www.spiderzrule.com/purseweb2.htm


4

It's a Brown-belted Bumble Bee (Bombus griseocollis). Details: http://bugguide.net/node/view/3538


7

It's Echinacea. I've linked to one site but if you run an images search with Echinacea as the search term you'll see lots of examples. And here is the WP page. Supplementary Echinacea are members of the Compositae. The flower (the head) in your picture is actually made up of lots of individual smaller flowers (i.e. it is a composite flower). The petals ...


1

With the information given, I have to say I think it's a Spangle, Papilio protenor, of the swallowtail family, probably a male. It also is listed on the butterflies of Taiwan. See pictures for comparison: ...


2

It is a torrent salamander. Most likely this is the southern torrent salamander (Rhyacotriton variegatus)


4

Looks like a mountain beaver (Aplodontia rufa) to me. Location, appearance, and minimal tail all match. A bit more detail: Where I'm from on Washington's Olympic Peninsula, they're not uncommon, but Butte County is near the southern end of their distribution (eol map page) and they may be less common there, and limited to cooler higher elevations (Beier ...



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