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8

A list of dyes is available here and a list of dyes specific to nucleic acids is available here. I think you have two choices the SYBR Gold nucleic acid gel stain (S11494) which can be detected under UV light (not sure if it can be used with polyacrylamide gels). Your other option which can be used with polyacrylamide gels is the SYBR Green II RNA gel stain ...


7

I would think GelRed or GelGreen would be an option too. They claim to be more sensitive than EtBr and certainly less toxic (even moreso than SYBR Green). I haven't personally used them against such a small bp product though. GelRed has basically the same excitation/emission wavelengths as EtBr so no equipment change is needed. Product sheet Store link


6

Maybe WB is easier for them to test? In general, however, my recommendation is to check if they provide refs to paper using those antibodies and look at the images on the paper. Be careful putting your trust in the supplier's pictures, I have seen obviously photoshopped images on commercial websites. Also always double-check the referenced papers, as ...


5

For fluorescence immunocytochemistry, there are 3 main incubations that determine duration of the procedure. Generally it takes 2 days to stain your cells before you can visualize them. Once cells or tissue are fixed onto glass, you first incubate with a primary antibody to directly target a specific antigen(s), usually overnight. After primary labelling, a ...


5

DAPI (4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole) preferentially binds AT-rich DNA (although it binds CG-rich DNA, too), which can give chromosomes distinctive banding patterns if they are polytene or in metaphase. In interphase condensed chromosomes, such as the inactive X chromosomes of female mammals (Barr Body), the relatively high concentration of tightly-packed ...


5

Not sure if this is what you are looking for, but I did some searching around for histochemicals and reptilia. I did come across a paper by L Alibardi, Dipartimento di Biologia evoluzionistica e sperimentale, University of Bologna, Bologna, Italy. Now, that exact application doesn't seem to answer your question, it did open up a web page that contained ...


4

I have had success with 1.5% agarose gels in TBE pre-stained with gelred. I use a 10,000x stock solution of gelred sold by http://biotium.com. I visualize the gel on an old fotodyne UV transilluminator. After melting agarose in the appropriate volume of TBE in a microwave, I let it cool to about 50 C (I can touch the flask with the back of my hand without ...


3

Antibodies for WB and for IF have fundamentally different requirements for the epitope structure. Antibodies for WB recognize denatured structures extended by SDS treatment. Antibodies for IF often will need to recognize a native-like structure. Depending on the supplier, some will have lots of antibodies for IF. I suggest looking around some more.


3

I don't think you should need to vary the concentration of the GelRed. Mine came with instructions for the exact concentration and how to dilute. Optionally salt can be added, which I did, and it has worked for me. I have only done this with Post-staining. 1-2.5% agarose with TAE. Used a 10,000x solution from Phenix research. The gelred stock and ...


3

I'm not a biologist. From a chemist's point of view, these molecules should have similar polarity. Their structure is very similar, actually. Considering your replacement rule is correct, I would say there wouldn't be much effect other than observing different colors. What is also plausible is that you'd have to reverse the interpretation of your results, ...


3

Giemsa is not a particular methid to stain malaria or any other parasite. It stains DNA. As such, it can be used to stain any DNA-containing organism, or, in other words, any known cell. Regarding its particular use in chromosomal banding, you can refer to many online resources, such as this one of the University of Washington: Chromosomes in metaphase ...


1

Probably they want something like from here: For differentiate nuclear and/or cytoplasmic morphology of platelets, RBCs, WBCs and parasites. In wright- and Giemsa-stain: the cytoplasm appears blue and the nucleus is relatively large, eccentrically located and red. The distinct, rod-shaped, red-staining kinetoplast (a specialized mitochondrial ...



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