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12

Fetal RNA - mRNA and microRNA - has been detected in maternal blood as shown in this report. Here's a second report showing how fetus gives back to repair the maternal myocardium - fetal cells traffic to an injured maternal myocardium and undergo cardiac differentiation.


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The easiest answer to this question is NO. We will not be able to print humans any time soon, if ever. Despite the potential of the technology, it will likely still make more sense to use stem cells to fight genetic diseases, create limited cellular masses such as hearts and other organs, and to do reconstructive surgeries such as skeletal repairs. The ...


4

There are several competing models of metastasis, and this question does go right to the differences between them. The primary thing to remember about CSCs is that all evidence suggests that they are a tiny, tiny subset of tumor cells. CTCs, meanwhile, consist of whichever cells manage to acquire the right combination of motility, invasiveness, and ...


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No. Very early in the development of an organism, it is just a clump of cells. Then those cells communicate, and determine where they are in the clump, which determines their eventual fate in the full organism. In mammals, for instance, cells split into three different layers, and the skin and nerve cells develop from cells in the outermost layer...etc. ...


3

In almost all metazoa, the pro-germline cells get segregated from other stem cells at an early stage of development and they thrive and differentiate in their neighborhood. This is important in order to preserve the germline. This post provides some basic explanation. However, even drosophila have adult multipotent stem cells and help in the formation of ...


2

Stem cells are not all 'unipotent' - they cannot necessarily differentiate into any type of cell. For instance, resident stem cells in tissues such as muscle - myo-satellite cells - are partially differentiated and during cell division one daughter differentiates further to become a myocyte (for example), and the other daughter the replacement myosatellite ...


2

I heard that as well and was skeptical at first, but apparently there IS science to support it- http://mblogs.discovermagazine.com/80beats/2011/11/21/helpful-mouse-fetuses-naturally-send-stem-cells-to-mom-to-fix-her-damaged-heart/ Officially found with mice, but it supports how some women that suffered damages while pregnant are sometimes found with their ...


2

You have a few misconceptions about stem cells, I will try to explain where they are. First of all, cells are not independent. They influence each other with signals and secreted messenger substances. If you look at a human embryo the state of totipotency (where all cells can differentiate into each cell type of the body) ends after 3-4 days when the ...


2

A skeleton is itself very complicated. It's not just apatite in the shape of a skeleton. The bones have structure, and many have bone marrow. Tiny cells navigate through the bone matrix, keeping it sound. Those cells, and the ones in the marrow, need a blood supply to keep them alive. Plus, what swbarnes2 said.


2

No. The reason is that development is extremely important for getting tissue organized on the appropriate scale. We can place groups of cells or a scaffold somewhere, but we can't assemble a working cell from component bits, much less make one that has one end in one's toe and the other in the spine (as is the case with sensory neurons for our legs). So ...


1

Strictly speaking ES cells are not man made, they come from blastocysts so already exist in nature. One thing you're forgetting is that even though stems cells that come from adults(experience aging) like iPS cells , they are reprogrammed to a naive or new state and thus are thought to "start all over" including getting longer telomeres(which shorten as you ...


1

The transplantation is an equivalent of a process that naturally occurs in human body, homing of the hematopoietic stem cells. Immature hematopoietic stem cells have the ability to pass the bone marrow barrier, and therefore is able to migrate between bones and other organs within an individual. (e.g. thymus, which is how it can produce T cells.) Williams ...


1

Autologous stem cell transplants are used to treat individuals who have had their bone marrow destroyed or damaged by diseases such as lymphomas or by irradiation or cancer treatments. As they are damaged and potentially cancerous, they are removed. They are then replaced in the transplant. The whole idea is to destroy all the cells before transplanting the ...


1

Another paper from Yamanaka's group explains Fbx15. It says: Inactivation of Oct3/4 in ES cells led to rapid extinction of Fbx15 expression. Fbx15-null ES cells were normal in morphology, proliferation, and differentiation. These data demonstrate that Fbx15 is a novel target of Oct3/4 but is dispensable for ES cell self-renewal, development, and ...


1

I'm not sure about the first developmental stages but, given you already have hundreds of cells with slightly different physiology, the next developmental stages like dev. of neural tube happen through excretion of translation factors and growth factors in several cells. Each of those cells that are in a region where more than one excretion overlaps get a ...



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