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Turtles are not amphibians because they have (largely) non-permeable skin whereas amphibians can absorb oxygen through their skin. There are also differences in their reproductive cycle: turtles are amniotes, so they produce eggs that must be laid on land, whereas amphibians - like fish - are not and must lay their eggs in water. Since the categorisation ...


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In addition to @Gerardo's answer: Reptiles The term Reptiles as used in popular language does not represent a monophyletic group. When using the term Reptiles, one is typically thinking of turtles, snakes and lizards but excluding birds and mammals (and a few other things not worth mentioning). There are two clades (monophyletic groups) whose name sounds ...


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Amphibians are not defined for having a moist skin, neither are reptiles defined for having scales on their body. In biology, organisms (elements) are grouped according to their evolutive history in monophyletic groups, also known as clades. Basicaly, a monophyletic group is A group consisting of an ancestral and all its descendants. "Tetrapoda" is a ...


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To put it simply, you know that Taxonomy is the branch of biology that deals with the classification of living organisms. Systematics, on the other hand, is nothing but Taxonomy + Phylogeny (i.e evolutionary relationships b/w organisms) Hence, we can say that Taxonomy is a part of Systematics. Talk about evolutionary history/relationships between organisms,...



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