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There is a lot of confusion and conflicting / imprecise definitions of these terms. It's biology after all :) A mitogen is an agent that causes a cell to enter mitosis. This definition is pretty clear, and there is a good consensus about it. (Well technically, mitosis is not the same as cell division, but we will gloss over this distinction.) The term ...


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You can find a great article about this here. basically, these two groups are very similar in their effects, however they work through different pathways. Mitogens directly promote cell to get through G1 checkpoint through highering the activity of cyclin D/cdk4 (the complex needed to get through the checkpoint.) and according to the article above, also ...


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As far as online dictionaries (Medical Dictionary, Merriam-Webster) and a popular-scientific site on hormones (Your Hormones) go, LH and ICSH are the same. ICSH mainly pops up in the older literature; e.g., Lostron & Johnson (1966) and Louvet et al. (1975). My understanding is that LH is currently the more accepted term for the hormone. I get the ...


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The answer to your (excellent) question is a matter of definition, which has its roots in the 18th century. A cathode is the electrode where conventional positive current leaves a current source. Conventional current is positive, due to historic reasons. Around 1750, Benjamin Franklin described the flow of current between wool and wax after ...



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