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In my mind, pipette and pipettor are generally* synonymous in the life sciences. Pipetman, which is actually a trademark, is also commonly used to refer to these instruments. http://www.gilsonuk.com/catalogue/product/itemNo/F123602 That being said, there are some other things that you need to differentiate between. A pipette tip is the (usually plastic) ...


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It depends upon your field, and its proximity to native specimen. In practice, in-vivo and ex-vivo are used to stress a relative difference. If you are biochemist in a field / research area that usually uses purified components and reconstitution: in-vivo If you are biochemist in a field / research area that usually measures glutamate within undried ...


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The classification usually applies to the experimental conditions. Are the experimental conditions applied to an organism, or to a less than whole organism (cells culture --> all the way to test tube chemistry reactions)? This is somewhat subjective, but in your case, since the experimental conditions are drying time of the pretty much whole organism (the ...


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The word "cancer" comes from the Latin cancer, meaning "crab". Both the Latin cancer and the Greek karkinos (hence "carcinoma"), that also means crab, come from the proto-Indo-European "qark", meaning "to be hard (like a crab)". Historically, tumours have been called this way because the similarity of some tumours with a crab. According to "Etymology Online"...


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It isn't. The name of the constellation/zodiac sign and of the malignant cell diseases comes from the Latin word "cancer", which means "crab". This name for the disease dates back to the Greeks and Hippocrates, who used the word "karkinos" (the Greek equivalent) because the veins around the tumors they observed made the disease look like a crab 3.


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Enzootic and epizootic are analogous to endemic and epidemic, respectively. Enzootic means something that affects a population of non-human animals in a limited spatio-temporal region whereas epizootic is relatively more widespread. Endemic and epidemic are more general terms and do not, technically, apply to only humans.


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Cognate means of common origin. In molecular biology, cognate is used to refer to known interacting pairs of functional entities. For example, cognate receptor of a ligand means the primary (default) receptor with which this ligand interacts. Similarly, cognate sites (which also includes enhancer) of a transcription factor (TF) refers to the well known and ...



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