Hot answers tagged

31

I'll keep this short and simple. The direction of transcription (which determines which strand is used as the template) is controlled by the promoter, which is a region of specific DNA motifs at the 5' end of a gene. RNA polymerase binds to the promoter, which orients it on the correct strand and in the correct direction, after which it can proceed to ...


15

I'd like to know what is the reference for amoebic learning. I cannot comment directly on this, but there is some evidence for "adaptive anticipation" in both prokaryotes and single-celled Eukaryotes which do not have a nervous system. In the case of E. coli, it has been shown that the bacteria can anticipate the environment it is about to enter. E. coli ...


12

The NF-κB family of transcription factors is very modular, with different combinations having different effects. The active (nuclear, DNA-bound) TF is a dimer, composed variously of RelA/p65, RelB, c-rel, NFKB1/p50, and/or NFKB2/p52 subunits. For example, the "canonical" p65/p50 dimer is activated in response to stimulants like TNF-α (tumor necrosis factor ...


12

Here I will assume we are talking about eukaryotic sequence specific transcription factors (ssTFs) and try to answer your first and part of the second question. There is in any case not definitive answer yet. An estimate of ssTFs genes in humans is given in the 2009 Nature Reviews Genetics paper by Vaquerizas, JM et al, A census of human transcription ...


11

To add to canadianer's answer, in fact genes can be found on both strands of the DNA in most eukaryotic cells, in the sense that the sense and anti-sense strands are not always the same strand. The direction is therefore completely determined by the promoter. Furthermore, there are bidirectional promoters.


10

I don't believe anything should change in the majority of DNA->RNA transcription. DNA methylation typically occurs on the non-watson crick side of Cytosine so it shouldn't affect the base-pairing. However, there are a few hypothetical situations that would result in alterations of the transcribed RNA. The sponatneous deamination of the 4' amine would ...


10

Methylation is increasingly seen as a consequence of gene activity rather than a regulatory mechanism. There are cases where methylation is controlled because of gene regulatory control, especially at the famous H19/Igf2 locus[1]. Here is a generally good recent review[2], note they mention that DNA methylation does not cause transcriptional silencing, and ...


9

This question is closely related, and the fascinating link posted by @JohnSmith is a good read. In short, with a four-base system, and a codon size of 1, you get four possible amino acids. Silly system. A codon size of 2 gives 16. Not too shabby, but not a lot of room for growth, and not enough for those 20 amino acids. Codons of size 3 gives 64 - ...


9

The techniques used to do this are ChIP-seq and ChIP-chip. Basically, you let the pathogen bind to the (highly replicated) DNA cut up the DNA into little random pieces by sonication enrich (“pull down”) the pathogen-bound DNA fragments by using a known antibody which binds to the pathogen sequence the thus enriched DNA map the sequenced fragments back to ...


7

In addition to the excellent response up top (by Poshpaws), one can also imagine how these systems work by looking at recent synthetic examples of single-celled organism memory. It is possible to design various bistable switches using protein pathways, RNAi, or other means that will latch a particular state. In that way, an organism could effectively ...


7

There are two mechanisms of transcriptional termination in prokaryotes. The one shown here is "rho-dependent" because it involves rho, a DNA-RNA helicase that loads on and unwinds the RNA from the DNA, terminating the elongation by the polymerase. Check out [1] which shows a model for how rho multimers move through the RNA. The other mechanism involves ...


7

Still if you change your question as (If histidine is abundant, HisP's job is to stop the histidine pathway as a "repressor." If HisP binds less tightly to promotors, the pathway should not produce as much histidine.) Then it should be under another assumption that what is the effect of HisP binding promoter of enzyme's gene. Is it suppressing the ...


7

No, this will not happen. mRNAs are inspected in the nucleus before they are exported into the cytoplasm (at least in eukaryotes), where transcription and translation don't happen at the same place. This ensures that no mRNAs without stop codons or premature stop codons are exported. This phenomenon is called "mRNA surveillance". mRNAs that do not pass this ...


6

The answer to this question depends upon the definition of the word 'promoter'. In the simplest possible model of prokaryotic transcription the promoter is the site where RNA polymerase binds to the DNA before initiating RNA synthesis. In this process the σ factor recognises the core promoter elements directing the polymerase to bind to the DNA to ...


6

That really depends on your system. At least for yeast the difference influences the strength of the activation ("Analysis of Transcriptional Activation at a Distance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae"). For bacteria such long distance regulations have recently been identified. Before that it was thought that this does happen only in eukaryotes. See the paper: ...


6

From the Methods section: Human TfR in plasmid cDNA was a gift from Tim McGraw (Weill-Cornell Medical College, New York, NY). Human TfR cDNA was subcloned in frame with EGFP in the Clontech pEGFP-N1 vector at the XhoI and BamHI restriction sites. This TfR-GFP fusion protein does not have the endogenous TfR promoter. So it is not likely to be ...


6

Genetic code and codons are always used with reference to RNA. When talking about DNA, the the sense strand of a gene is considered its sequence. The anti-sense strand though is the template for mRNA synthesis, does not represent the gene. DNA-codon table has simply U replaced by T. Apart from a wikipedia article, I don't find the term being popularly (not ...


6

Multiple RNA Polymerase transcription complexes engaged on the lacZ gene at the same time, staggered along the gene.


6

Most (almost all, AFAIK) mRNAs and lncRNAs start with exons for the reasons already mentioned by David. In a typical splicing event, the nucleotide that is 5' to the splice donor site (lets call it pre-donor) and the one that is 3' to the acceptor site (lets call it post acceptor) are joined together and the intronic sequence between them is removed. If ...


5

A quick search on T7 cysteines gave some clues: Bacteriophage T7-induced DNA polymerase is composed of a 1: 1 complex of phage-induced gene 5 protein and Escherichia coli thioredoxin. Preparation of active subunits in the absence of sulfhydryl reagents indicates the reduced form of thioredoxin is sufficient for formation of the active ...


5

As you pointed out, the repressor gene lacI is transcribed as a one mRNA, and three structural genes: lacZ, lacY and lacA are transcribed into a single polycistronic mRNA. The two mRNAs are translated independently of one another. The polycisronic mRNA is not broken into pieces. Rather, it is translated by ribosomes (at least three, explanation below), ...


5

A large number of prokaryotes do indeed have nucleosome-like structures. The most well studied is H-NS in E. coli, Salmonella and some other deltaproteobacteria. H-NS like molecules have also been found in mycoplasma (Lsr2). One of its roles is to bind AT-rich DNA and silence transcription. The binding is usually to suppress the expression of foreign DNA ...


5

Both the DNA and the RNA polymerase complexes moves along the DNA molecule like it was a track. While the new mRNA is big, it would never be as big as the whole genome, so the reference point is the DNA molecule. Plus, the functioning of the movement of this enzymes is quite similar to other proteins that move "climbing" long polymers, such as actin polymers ...


5

Yes. For an example, see this list of targets of NF-kB (a transcription factor). Many other transcription factors are included there. As for a TF that does nothing except activate another, single TF? I don't know that those exist - TFs tend to modulate multiple genes.


5

From the wikipedia article on TFs: In molecular biology and genetics, a transcription factor (sometimes called a sequence-specific DNA-binding factor) is a protein that binds to specific DNA sequences, thereby controlling the flow (or transcription) of genetic information from DNA to messenger RNA. The nature of the gene affected is irrelevant, a ...


5

This is the Curated database of mouse and human transcription factors. And this is the paper in which they describe how they curated the database. In summary, there are 3230 putative mouse TF, 1200 of which are described in scientific papers.


5

As the number of human TFs have been discussed by the previous answers, I'll limit myself to Anopheles gambiae. In the same issue of Science in which Holt et al. published a genome sequence for Anopheles gambiae (1), Zdobnov et al. published a comparison of the A. gambiae and Drosophila melanogaster genomes.(2) While the two species diverged about 250 ...


5

You mix up translation and transcription. Transcription creates mRNA from DNA template. Transcription also includes splicing, that is excision of introns so that mature mRNA contains only exons. In your example it goes like that: DNA (chromosome): ---A----B--...--Dstop---E--- premature mRNA: A----B---...---Dstop--E---polyA mature mRNA: AB..DstopE-polyA ...


5

Take a look at this schematic of a mature mRNA. [source] The coding region (ie the part that is translated) is between the start and stop codons, but the 5' and 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) are also transcribed by RNA polymerase; these are part of the first and last exons, respectively. The transcription start site is labelled right in front of the 5' ...


4

There seems to be some solid evidence that transcription promotes mutation because the untranscribed strand is able to form secondary structures which expose bases to chemical mutagenesis. Here is a recent paper about transcription-associated mutagenesis: Kim H et al.(2010) Transcription-associated mutagenesis increases protein sequence diversity more ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible