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This is a deceptively and badly worded trick question. Your confusion is because it starts with a mention of RNA polymerase, which transcribes DNA into mRNA, but asks about the protein, which is produced by the translation of the mRNA on ribosomes. The first step in solving the problem is asking what is the sequence of the mRNA produced by the ...


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There is indeed a gene, called nusG which is believed to be antiterminator of RNA transcription. NusG binds to RNA polymerase which leads to increased RNA elongation rate, decreased time in which the polymerase is into short-lived paused states, and suppressed long-lived stabilized pause states 1. NusG has been shown to be important for natural product ...


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I have searched for information on this topic as I used to work in the area of protein biosynthesis, but without success. However one argument against there being a tendency for ribosomes to fall off mRNA is the very specific mechanism for ribosome release after the stop codon has been reached (described here). There are other possible problems with very ...


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Concise Answer The 5′-UTR region of a eukaryotic mRNA is derived from the RNA transcript of the region of a gene between the transcription start site and the DNA corresponding to the translational initiation codon. It differs from that region of the initial transcript in most cases by having a modified guanosine nucleotide added at the 5′-end in a ‘cap’ ...


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Short answer The 5' UTR on the mRNA includes sequence from the Transcriptional Start Site (TSS) to the first exon. Promoters are usually associated with a corresponding TSS. Longer answer In defining a UTR we must consider where transcription begins. Strictly speaking transcription begins at the Transcriptional Start Site (TSS). A useful website for exact ...


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The UTR is the region of the transcript upstream of the starting methionine. The promotor is not itself transcribed.



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