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Yes, we do perceive a composite spectrum in a way which is analogous to how we perceive the corresponding single-peak spectrum. Human beings have trichromatic vision, meaning that there are 3 types of specialized cells in our eyes for seeing color. Each one has a different color of light which produces peak stimulus, although they all perceive a range of ...


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With a small image small motion errors will cause misinterpretation and continuous focus efforts tiring that ciliary muscle. Keep your monitor distance comfortable, increase its brightness (smaller pupil larger depth of field) then increase font size. It's probably better to read from the further monitor. Because the monitor's increased distance, reduces ...


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“Self-induction” in photosensitive epilepsy is a well-described and fascinating phenomenon. Photosensitivity itself is rare, occurring in only ~5% of patients with epilepsy.1 Among this group it has been estimated2 that 25% self-induce epileptiform activity. The most common methods appear to be passing a hand with open fingers repeatedly across the visual ...


3

Balance is tricky and depends on a lot of things, including, to some degree, your sight. Balance is achieved and maintained by a complex set of sensorimotor control systems that include sensory input from vision (sight), proprioception (touch), and the vestibular system (motion, equilibrium, spatial orientation); integration of that sensory input; and motor ...


3

Interesting question! Determining the focus of a visual image is carried out in the visual association area of the brain. Ultimately, this process results in focusing of the retinal image by adjustment of the shape of the lens in the eye. Lens shaping to focus the image is called accommodation The neuronal circuitry involved in accommodation includes the ...


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The neurology of vision is an extremely complex subject and is difficult to describe with any brevity, because there is so very much going on in so many parts of the brain. It is estimated that about 50% of the pathways of the brain, and about 30% of the cortex are involved in vision (where only 8% of the cortex is devoted to touch, and 3% to hearing). Some ...


3

The answer to this question is complicated, but assume it's not for the moment. The easy answer is that our eyes can detect patterns we're familiar with and "produce" an answer in the form of a number. Unfamiliar patterns do not produce this 'number'. Take a die. We are immediately aware of the number of dots in the typical arrangement of one to six. We ...


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The places of red, green and blue wavelengths in the spectrum are physically defined and, therefore, not arbitrary; see this question on Biology SE. Before continuing, it is good to mention that trichromacy (the presence of red, green and blue cones in the retina) is typical for primates. For example, dichromacy (<500 and >500 nm cones) is the most ...


1

As WYSIWYG wrote, energy is the answer, but to clarify the dependence of energy from momentum... sorry, the dependence of frequency from wavelength, have a look at the animation on this web page: http://www.acs.psu.edu/drussell/Demos/wave-x-t/wave-x-t.html, posted here in what I believe complies with fair use legislation: It represents a sinusoidal wave, ...


4

It depends to some degree on what you define as peripheral vision. Until relatively recently, color vision in the peripheral field has been thought to be substantially less developed than color vision in the central field. Most estimates of peripheral color perception place the limit of trichromatic (RBG) vision at no more than 30 degrees from fixation; ...


3

There are two types of photoreceptor in the eye, known as rods and cones. Rods are spread equally throughout the whole retina, whereas cones are focussed in one spot known as the fovea: Cones are the only type of photoreceptor that can sense colour, so rods can only sense black and white. However, rods can work in much lower light and will also work when ...


0

You may have the early symptoms of glaucoma. Often the red is the first colour to die off and one eye may be affected more than the other. This can progress rapidly without treatment so you should see your optometrist urgently.



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