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Your sugar substrate was sucrose. Yeast cells metabolise this by secreting an enzyme, invertase, which splits the disaccharide into glucose and fructose both of which can be fermented by yeast to produce CO2. According to this site Equal Original (blue packaging)  is a zero calorie sweetener that contains aspartame and acesulfame potassium as its ...


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Not well, they need dextrose. Use YBT: 20 g Casein Peptone Tpe-M 10 g Yeast Extract 20 g Dextrose 17 g Agar q.s. to 975 mls in di-water. pH to 6.2 w 5M NaOH q.s. to 1L with di-water. Autoclave for 45 min at 121C Aseptically dispense in Petri dishes. Store at 4C for up to 12 weeks. If you want to grow Co-culture do so in LB supplemented with 20g/L ...


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I've published a paper comparing different measures of specificity, if that is of any help. But if you plan to have, e.g., measures of performance on carbon sources, pH, and temperature, then you'll have three measures of specificity (i.e. one for each). Also, worth to have a look at Graham Bell's inconsistency and responsiveness, as used by Venail et al. ...


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The Saccharomyces Genome Database has a list of sources here. One of them is the Japanese Yeast Genetic Stock Center: I checked their site out and found that they charge ¥390 per strain which is around USD4. There is also a USD5 fee on all orders. I searched for a couple of standard strains, and these were in the catalogue, so it looks like a good ...


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Browsing around GEO, I see 13 experiments focusing on microtubule disruption in yeast. This CHIP-CHP experiment actually uses nocodazole. This is a microarray experiment with benomyl treatment. The rest focus on specific mutants that try to perturb the microtubules in specific ways. What's more if you broaden the search there is an extensive body of ...


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Here is my list, in no particular order. Methods in Yeast Genetics Some other yeast books at CSHL Fred Sherman's primer, available free at various sites including here. The Freiburg manual here The timeless classics (link to volume 3 but see all volumes) The YeastBook is an attempt to build a current encyclopaedia to replace the previous item on my ...


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Equal is marketed as a "zero calorie" sweetener, with respect to human digestion. The sweetening agents are aspartame (Asp-Phe; a dipeptide) and acesulfame K. The maltodextrin and dextrose are probably bulking agents to give the product a free-flowing, poweder consistence. The "fermentables" in question are: Dextrose. This is another name of glucose, and ...


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I don't have a definitive answer to this, but a little over a decade ago I was in an undergraduate lab that had a similar thing happen - a small amount of metabolism of a "control" group of bacteria fed artificial, sugar/calorie free sweeteners instead of sugar. Our running theories at the time were: Contamination. Always a problem in laboratory ...


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ATCC is the place I would go to, just like purchasing cell lines or bacterial lines. The reference ATCC catalog numbers are also listed with each of the common strains you have linked. Depending on the purpose, you could just go to your local grocery store for baker's yeast.


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You could try Paracoccus denitrificans. Here is a study where acetate is used as the growth-limiting substrate: http://citeseerx.ist.psu.edu/viewdoc/download?doi=10.1.1.320.1692&rep=rep1&type=pdf Here's the details of its version of acetate kinase: http://www.uniprot.org/uniprot/A1B9S8 I'd be happy to collaborate with you further on this.


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Although this information doesn't provide a direct answer to your question, I hope that it sets the scene for what is achievable in metabolic engineering from IPP. It should also provide a jumping off point for further literature research. This is a fairly recent review of metabolic engineering of relevant pathways in various microbial systems, including ...



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