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10

As a couple of counterexamples, species in the classes Symphyla (Pseudocentipedes) and Pauropoda within Myriapoda have 8-11 and 12 leg pairs respectively, so between 16 to 24 legs (sometimes with one or two leg pair stronlgy reduced in size). (species in Symphyla, from wikipedia) Another common and species-rich group with 14 walking legs (7 leg pairs) is ...


5

Some animals do like; Ants prepare their meat not by heating but by marinating it with digestive enzymes to create a glistening protein slurry. With their hourglass figures, adult ants have such tiny waists that solid food can't pass through to their abdomens. Biologists already knew that the blob-shaped larvae predigest meat. Some scientists had suggested ...


4

I don't think it's an Arizona recluse. Characteristic of all recluse spiders (including the five varieties found in Arizona): Long thin legs Oval shaped abdomen 6 eyes in dyads (pairs) Uniformly colored abdoment with fine hairs No spines on legs Legs are uniformly colored Light tan to dark brown in color Distinct violin-shaped mark on on ...


4

Poison dart frogs have aposematic colouration, making them the exact opposite of camoflaged. They are also predators, since they feed on ants, termites and beetles.


3

What is a predator? As discussed in the comments by @MarchHo and @AMR, there is discrepancy between the definition of predation in the biology literature and in the every day use. Population definition From the Oxford dictionary predation- The preying of one animal on others; the behaviour of a predator (predator n. 2); (also occas.) an instance of ...


2

The question is currently too broad and your list of species is rather unexpected! Important Concepts You probably want to learn about the concept of bioindicators Bioindicators are a species that can be used to monitor the health of an environment or ecosystem. They are any biological species or group of species whose function, population, or status ...


2

Top speed = 20 mph (32 kmh), according to a-z animals.


2

I believe a lot of these behaviours can fall under the umbrella term of reciprocity, or reciprocal altruism. In evolutionary biology, reciprocal altruism is a behaviour whereby an organism acts in a manner that temporarily reduces its fitness while increasing another organism's fitness, with the expectation that the other organism will act in a ...


1

Cells consist mainly of water and the compressibility of water is very low. Wikipedia states: The low compressibility of water means that even in the deep oceans at 4 km depth, where pressures are 40 MPa, there is only a 1.8% decrease in volume. This means that the pressure alone does not affect the size of the cells much. However, the pressure affects ...


1

Yes, there are plenty of examples! We refer to this seeking behaviour as taxis. Taxis There are many types of taxis such as chemotaxis (attracted to chemical stimulus) or phototaxis (attracted to light). A complete list of taxis can be found on wikipedia > taxis. For the purpose of this answer I will restrict to chemotaxis only Chemotaxis (from chemo- ...


1

One of the comment to David's answer (which covers the history and reasons for spiderwebs in its two links) mentions a comparison between web patterns and molecular phylogeny. Not precisely that, but I found this article which opens up some interesting possibilities (I can delete this or turn it into a comment if you consider it too unrelated, please let me ...



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