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5

This is generally done by checking for the vaginal plug in the female after you have set up the breeding. If the plug is visible then it means that copulation has happened. However, this is not a foolproof test because the vaginal plug just indicates copulation and not pregnancy. This, nonetheless works in most cases and helps you in timing the pregnancy ...


4

It is a longhorn beetle (Cerambycidae), most certainly from the subfamily Lamiinae (flat-faced longhorns). The overall apparence with a downward-pointing face, partially divided eyes, robust build and spined pronotum fits well with Lamiinae. The beetle in you picture is very similar to species in the genus Batocera, for instance Batocera rufomaculata ...


4

I think it is from Cerambycidae family, Batocera parryi -


3

Eventually, I've stumbled upon an article which calls it a cigar jellyfish. Further research even shows a very empty entry on Wiki about it, which consists of the single line entry: The cigar jellyfish (Olindias phosphorica) is a species of jellyfish from the Central and East Atlantic, and the Mediterranean Sea, including off Malta.[2] Also an ...


3

The short answer is yes, other animals can experience dwarfism, including dogs, although it may not be what you are expecting. Dogs are apparently particularly susceptible but they often are a special case. We've so heavily bred dogs for whatever traits we desire, so now entire breeds are affected by dwarfism, such as dachshunds and corgis. The reality is ...


3

They can't see all the birds that are around them as some are hidden behind the others. However, I don't think there is anything so extraordinary; they watch around, have good reflexes and can change direction very abruptly. There is no need for some kind of special sensing abilities to explain bird flocks. 3 simple rules One can simulate a flock of birds ...


3

There is a correlation between the heartbeat and the life expectancy as you can see below. This relationship is not linear (the y-axis is on a logarithmic scale) and is negative, that is, the faster is the heart beat, the lower is the life expectancy. You'll note the outlier (human) that has a life expectancy that is twice as high as you wold expect from ...


2

I think it's a Robber Fly. Those are predatory.


2

I think that your insect is a White-spotted sawyer. For more information check this: Monochamus scutellatus, commonly known as the white-spotted sawyer or spruce sawyer,is a common wood-boring beetle found throughout North America. Adults are large-bodied and black, with very long antennae; in males, they can be up to twice the body length, but in females ...


2

In this case i am going to agree with AliceD, because I live in Greece and here we hear cicadas everywhere. But in Madrid, there is a other kind of cicada that its "song" is more noisy and more deep.In this video you can hear how your cicada sings.https://youtu.be/mah26og11ms


2

As suggested by AliceD, it does indeed appear to be some kind of cicada. I went down the river and heard one calling, unusually far from the river (30m) where there are lower, newly planted trees. I was able to approach it and take this photo which unfortunately isn't very good. It's possible that it's even the same species as the video I added to the ...


1

I don't think this is a complete answer, but I know that historically hair, like horse tail has been used as a part of armor, because it is flexible and difficult to cut through (see dragoon helmet picture). Protection could be one of the primary purposes of facial hair in human males, who are more likely to experience aggression or be hunters.


1

When they are flying together as a flock, they anticipate the flock's behavior and react accordingly. earthsky.org/earth/how-do-flocking-birds-move-in-unison And when they are just flying around, but not in a flock, the concept is the same as how we humans don't collide into each other when we are walking. Although birds fly faster, they also see farther ...


1

I agree with some comments that have been made on the validity of the wording used by OP. However there is a legitimate thrust to the question. What could drive Lion sociality? Females are the base unit of lion social groups. Males are generally the nomadic sex. Male lions will try to take over a group of females by killing the current cubs and mating with ...



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