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10

I am not too sure but this seems like Polycelis sierrensis. Though it is apparent that the worm in your pictures is a tricladid planarian, I was not too sure about the species and the geographical distribution. However, from the Smithsonian list of freshwater planarians in North America, I deduced that this should be Polycelis sierrensis which is found in ...


6

Short answer Echolocating bats have relatively large sensory epithelia in their inner ear, that may correlate with their high upper frequency limit of up to 200 kHz. The basilar membrane is thinner and stiffer, possibly allowing it to decode higher frequencies. Background In terms of the place theory of hearing, the cochlea acts as a frequency transformer, ...


5

The overall shape appears to match that of a flatworm or planarian, but those don't have eyestalks. Also, in the images you posted, none of the worms appear to have the characteristic eyespots of a flatworm, although they DO look planarian-like in some photos: If they didn't look so thin, I'd say they were common garden slugs. We get them all the time ...


4

Short answer: many species can drop a regrown tail again and again again, however a few can only drop it once, while some lizards cannot drop their tails at all. It all depends on the species. Background information: According to this site the tail will only be able to be shed above the site it originally broke off. Although according to UCSB there are a ...


3

Their capacity to elongate / contract and their two head lobes make me think they are Planarians. The two points on their heads must be their eyes: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Simple_eye_in_invertebrates#Ocelli_or_eye_spots


3

Male grasshoppers often mate several times with multiple female, and some females will mate again after, and perhaps even before they lay their eggs. So no, they are not monogamous. Rufous grasshoppers for example have a very special mating cycle, the male will attract other females, possibly more than one with "pursuit sounds". After copulation, he keeps ...


1

Both. Many primates bite their nails. Some do not. It's not species specific. Chimpanzees, for example, usually bite their nails; some prefer to leave them alone. They do grow continuously, and nails not kept trimmed probably break off (looking at the thickness of those nails, I get the impression that this might be rather painful if they break too short.) ...


1

Why some human beings bite their nails? Because, they are primates - it is inherited way to treat our nails, called onychophagia. While normal in some primates (and this is the way they treat their nails), it is considered abnormal in human.


1

Not all animals are equally predisposed for domestication. To be easily domesticated, animal should have: Flexible diet - and not compete with humans for food Reasonably fast growth rate Ability to be bred in captivity Pleasant disposition Temperament which makes it unlikely to panic Modifiable social hierarchy Wikipedia link above has plenty of ...



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