Hot answers tagged

23

It looks as though it has a keel along it's back (the area behind the mantle shield.) If so (and I think it is), it would be a keelback slug, the coloration strongly suggesting a leopard slug (Limax maximus): Coloration varies but the general pattern is a spotted spotted mantle sheild about a third of its length in size, with a striped tail. The major ...


5

It looks like a squash bug to me (Pyrrhocoris apterus). If not apterus, I'd say it is at least in the Pyrrhocoridae family. Note, they must not but confounded with Corizus hyoscyami. Here is a picture of Pyrrhocoris apterus: Pyrrhocoris apterus have a very broad range covering a big part of Eurasia, from France to China. Is it where you found it?


4

Several ungulates and other species such as seals and primates are known to initially use odour to discriminate their offspring. Most relevant work to study this has been done in sheep; sheep are ideal for studying attachment because there are ethical and logistic difficulties that limit laboratory and research use of most other species known to develop ...


3

What is the purpose of their loud, annoying sound? Both males and females produce a sound when flying but not at the same frequency. I would think of the male sound as mainly an artefact of flying and don't really know if it has any usefulness. I would note though that before mating both gender tend to synchronize their sound (Gibson and Russel 2006). ...


2

This seems to be a species of the genus Pyrrhocoris, most probably the firebug Pyrrhocoris apterus. Its quite common in Europe, but according to the Global Biodiversity Information Facility there are also some occurrences in the US.


2

Your link says: [...] whereof the Latines derive or rather borrow their Cordulus, and Cordyla [...]. Wikipedia says about this: The genus Cordylus (Sauria: Cordylidae) includes a wide variety of small- to medium-sized spiny lizards from Africa, collectively called girdle-tailed or girdled lizards. Tropical girdled lizard (Cordylus ...


2

Breathing during digging And if all that wasn’t enough responsibility for these claws, they also are used for digging. While most digging crabs use their back legs to burrow backwards into the sand, the shame-faced crab uses the claws like little bulldozers, excavating the sand forward so the crab sinks downward until it is completely covered by the ...


1

Since asking this question, I've learned that 97% of male mammals do not have concept of "beauty" and will mate with every female indiscriminately. These species do not have any paternal investment, so the males are not picky. In other 3% of mammals (~100 species) and a lot of birds, there is a significant degree of paternal investment in offspring. Species ...



Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible