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I know first hand that Diamond, a tame Pionus chalcopterus, will sometimes respond to having his head and neck scratched in an interesting manner: he may make "panting" or "huffing" noises unique to this activity, lean his forehead or beak against my hand, and half-close his eyes. I'll add to Ryan's answer by pointing out another use of preening: peeling ...


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The concept is the same as how we humans don't collide into each other when we are walking. Although birds fly faster, they also see farther (eagles and other birds of prey can see four to five times farther than the average human can), which means that they have a longer distance to react.


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I don't think this is a complete answer, but I know that historically hair, like horse tail has been used as a part of armor, because it is flexible and difficult to cut through (see dragoon helmet picture). Protection could be one of the primary purposes of facial hair in human males, who are more likely to experience aggression or be hunters.


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There is a correlation between the heartbeat and the life expectancy as you can see below. This relationship is not linear (the y-axis is on a logarithmic scale) and is negative, that is, the faster is the heart beat, the lower is the life expectancy. You'll note the outlier (human) that has a life expectancy that is twice as high as you wold expect from ...


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They can't see all the birds that are around them as some are hidden behind the others. However, there is nothing so extraordinary; they watch around, have good reflexes and can change direction very abruptly. There is no need for some kind of special sensing abilities to explain bird flocks. 3 simple rules One can simulate a flock of birds with 3 simples ...


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It is a longhorn beetle (Cerambycidae), most certainly from the subfamily Lamiinae (flat-faced longhorns). The overall apparence with a downward-pointing face, partially divided eyes, robust build and spined pronotum fits well with Lamiinae. The beetle in you picture is very similar to species in the genus Batocera, for instance Batocera rufomaculata ...


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I think it's a Robber Fly. Those are predatory.


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Many times fiddlers ( female crabs) will do this, often first climbing to the highest spot they can reach. It is referred to as "airing out", and some people think it is a cooling mechanism like sweating. Others think it's connected to stress. Most likely it is a way to keep their gills moist and to balance the salt concentration within their body. If ...


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I think that your insect is a White-spotted sawyer. For more information check this: Monochamus scutellatus, commonly known as the white-spotted sawyer or spruce sawyer,is a common wood-boring beetle found throughout North America. Adults are large-bodied and black, with very long antennae; in males, they can be up to twice the body length, but in females ...


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I think it is from Cerambycidae family, Batocera parryi -


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Since it got bumped and no one seemed to be too clear on an identification. Based on the presence of two recurrent veins in the forewing, following identification guidelines here, I'd identify the above wasp to be a member of Ichneumonidae. The identification of the subfamily, however, is difficult without access to the wasp itself for close observation. ...


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In this case i am going to agree with AliceD, because I live in Greece and here we hear cicadas everywhere. But in Madrid, there is a other kind of cicada that its "song" is more noisy and more deep.In this video you can hear how your cicada sings.https://youtu.be/mah26og11ms


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As suggested by AliceD, it does indeed appear to be some kind of cicada. I went down the river and heard one calling, unusually far from the river (30m) where there are lower, newly planted trees. I was able to approach it and take this photo which unfortunately isn't very good. It's possible that it's even the same species as the video I added to the ...


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I agree with some comments that have been made on the validity of the wording used by OP. However there is a legitimate thrust to the question. What could drive Lion sociality? Females are the base unit of lion social groups. Males are generally the nomadic sex. Male lions will try to take over a group of females by killing the current cubs and mating with ...


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The short answer is yes, other animals can experience dwarfism, including dogs, although it may not be what you are expecting. Dogs are apparently particularly susceptible but they often are a special case. We've so heavily bred dogs for whatever traits we desire, so now entire breeds are affected by dwarfism, such as dachshunds and corgis. The reality is ...


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This question pertains to organism dispersal, which is a very active field of study with relation to it's impact on conservation efforts. Much of what I will say below has been covered in this wiki. Definition: From the Wiki Technically, dispersal is defined as any movement that has the potential to lead to gene flow. It can be broadly classified ...


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This is not a direct answer to your question, but I want to point out that your basic premise is partially incorrect. Other felines also form social groups. For instance, male cheetahs form coalitions (also see Cheetah outreach at http://www.cheetah.co.za/c_info.html), often for life, which generally makes them more successful in defending territories. ...


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I don't imagine a frog is going to go hopping over a hill to get to a marsh on the other side, is it? Why not? In wet weather, the conditions would be just fine for an enterprising amphibian to go exploring, perhaps driven by predators or lack of available resources, not to mention Ro Siv's comment about wind-borne dispersal of animals. Birds of prey ...



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