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3

I think it's a common wolf spider, which closely resemble funnel weavers. It's almost a toss-up. I can't tell from the resolution of your photograph, but funnel weavers have spiny legs whereas the wolf has smooth legs and has a bit more of a difference in the comparative size of the abdomen to thorax. Wolf spider (coloration varies) vs. funnel weaver (in ...


4

Constrictors doesn't have uniform body circumference from head to tail. They coil around the prey accordingly. In your example, if the prey is very small, it just swallows. If its little big, it coils a little bit (check some videos like this) say two turn coil. This will only cover top half feet of constrictor's length which is of lesser diameter than the ...


2

I disagree with GForce's explanation; the meaning is not that growth of prey populations causes instability in predator species. The sentence is merely saying that without predation, prey population growth is more likely to be at a level which leads to ecosystem instability. The term "but for predation" means "if it wasn't for the effects of predation". In ...


6

No. The article linked to is a hoax, and was debunked by Snopes. The website is known for its hoaxes and satirical articles, and it states itself that its articles are faked. WNDR assumes however all responsibility for the satirical nature of its articles and for the fictional nature of their content. All characters appearing in the articles in this ...


0

It's essentially saying that high densities of prey species can cause ecosystem instability not only for themselves but also for the predators which prey upon them. In other words, high densities of prey species not only cause ecosystem instability by competing with each other, but this instability can move up the food chain and affect predators at higher ...


1

I think that there are too many examples of animals being deliberately quiet when grazing to count. I'll discuss specifically the exceptions you raise and how they are exceptional. Hopefully you'll see my point: A lot of grazers are quiet and cautious or failing that have other adaptive strategies for not being eaten. Deer are incredibly quiet and cautious ...


3

Does soundproofing count? Most predators locate prey using visual or olfactory cues; the only predators I can think of that use auditory cues are nocturnal ones - owls and bats. Bats, of course, use echolocation, so even completely silent prey are still detectable. It has been suggested that the soft, fur-like body coverings of some owlet moths (Noctuidae) ...


1

These are definitely cicadas and mating is the primary reason for their long calls. As for the reason you've found many dead or dying cicadas, their lifecycle is primarily spent underground where they feed on tree roots. They will emerge and transform into their adult form which enables them to make their calls and mate, and many species die shortly after ...


5

Skin First, you are being mislead by your wrong assumption that hippos have a soft skin. Hippos have a 5 cm thick skin! For fun, here is a picture of a hippo skin. They are big An adult hippo weighs between 1.5 and 3 tons and can run at 8 km/h in water and at 30 km/h on land. They have an aggressive nature Hippos are aggressive animals (esp. the ...


8

These are Cicadas, of the superfamily Cicadoidea of the order Hemiptera. These sounds are made by the males to attract mates. There are a lot of species, each making there own specific sound to attract the right mate. However, to the human ear, these sounds don't sound different. Cicadas are also able to produce other sounds, in distress or during courtship ...


17

After a lot of scrolling through image searches I stumbled upon the answer: this is the egg mass of some sort of horse-fly (Tabanidae). Almost identical egg mass here: http://bugguide.net/node/view/21171 I'm assuming I won't get a more specific answer than this.


7

In my opinion there might be two reasons why the camel hump (rather than bump) might be one of the adequate adaptations of camels to living in the cold (additional to their flat feet giving hold on both snow and sand and tooth structure, Rybczynski et al., 2012). Both match the humps being fat storages in modern camels. The first is also provided by ...


4

I am not sure I understood the question. Is the following your question? Among all species living in central Europe, which one is the most closely related to homo sapiens? Source of information opentreeoflife.org (nice vizualisation on OneZoom.org) is one of the most update synthesis of existing research inn phylogenetic reconstruction. I base my ...


3

Turtles are not amphibians because they have (largely) non-permeable skin whereas amphibians can absorb oxygen through their skin. There are also differences in their reproductive cycle: turtles are amniotes, so they produce eggs that must be laid on land, whereas amphibians - like fish - are not and must lay their eggs in water. Since the categorisation ...


7

In addition to @Gerardo's answer: Reptiles The term Reptiles as used in popular language does not represent a monophyletic group. When using the term Reptiles, one is typically thinking of turtles, snakes and lizards but excluding birds and mammals (and a few other things not worth mentioning). There are two clades (monophyletic groups) whose name sounds ...


20

Amphibians are not defined for having a moist skin, neither are reptiles defined for having scales on their body. In biology, organisms (elements) are grouped according to their evolutive history in monophyletic groups, also known as clades. Basicaly, a monophyletic group is A group consisting of an ancestral and all its descendants. "Tetrapoda" is a ...


1

Yes, the mechanism of patellar locking does occur in quadrupeds too. Although they are 4 limbed, a major portion of the weight is borne by the hind limbs. This is known as the stay apparatus and includes the mechanisms of Patellar locking, reciprocal mechanism and check apparatus. On the other hand in the forelimb, although there is no locking mechanism as ...


1

It depends on the animal, some can get it, others cannot. Down syndrome is the result of an extra copy of the twenty first human chromosome. So, it is a rather humanly genetic problem. However, the closer an animal is to humans, the greater the chance of it being at risk of suffering from down syndrome. There have been several chimpanzees found ...


3

Animals can be generated with genetic defects similar to Down Syndrome, but not that exact condition, except in the case of great apes. Down Syndrome is a kind of defect called a chromosomal abnormality, meaning that either there is an extra chromosome or an excessive repetition of the same genes on a particular chromosome. In the case of Down Syndrome, ...



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