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This is a hoverfly! Specifically in the genus Helophilus. A lot of species of hoverflies exhibit Batesian mimicry of wasps/bees, as we see here, while they mainly feed on pollen and nectar. So please, don't worry about it trying to bite you. As far as species go, I think it is probably a Helophilus trivittatus. I am basing that on location and a lot on ...


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It's not a wasp. Wasps have a thin waist. It's a fly, and flies can indeed be fast. I would not bet on Tabanidae, but on Sarcophagidae instead, because your fly looks less hairy than what I'm used to for horseflies, and because of the striped pattern on the thorax, but it may well be some other family.


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It looks like a horse-fly What is a horsfly? Horse-flies (Tabanidae) represent a family in the order of Diptera that are distributed world-wide. They are large flies that fly quickly. Adults feed on nectar while females feed on mammals blood (including humans). When they sting, it hurts much more than a mosquito! You probably want to get rid of it before ...


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So, to go through the question in total: (a) Part A nucleus is correct, but Part B ist the cytosol/cytoplasm, as the line does not stop at the border, but goes through it and ends in the gray part of the cell. (b) For part C, it is the same problem as in your first question. Yes, the picture may be a plant cell, however, upon this drawing one cannot ...


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Well from what I have been taught, and have studied, is that multiple partners for men does not equal more of their DNA persisting, because they are needed to provide for the offspring. So if they impregnate 10 different females and don't stick around, that really doesn't help them pass on their DNA because most would die. So having a family with the same ...


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According to Wikipedia the Crab-eating frog is the only amphibian that can survive in sea water. However Wikipedia also suggests that it can only survive brief excursions into the sea. There are no such things as sea frogs. Even the Crab-eating frog doesn't live in the sea though. Its natural habitat is mangrove swamps. The crab-eating frog (Fejervarya ...


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As I understand the main purpose of the gallbladder is to ensure the full digestion fatty or otherwise difficult or complex foods to digest in support of the liver. Both rats and mice breastfeed for about the same amount of time 4-5 weeks. Rats typically have a longer life cycle than mice. But there are more specific reasons why some mammals don't have or ...


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Although I am afraid I don't know much about fire salamanders specifically, it is certainly possible for ingested fly larvae (or larvae hatching from ingested eggs) to survive ingestion and subsequently cause intestinal damage. Parasitic infestation by fly larvae that grow inside the host while feeding on its tissue is called myiasis. Enteric myiasis (also ...


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It depends on the altitude of the plane, species of ant, flight length, location in hold, and more, but generally yes, they should be able to survive. At such locations that a plane flies at, the temperatures range from 0 to -50 degrees Centigrade. At such extreme temperatures the ant's entire body system is brought to an almost complete stop, where their ...


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I think it's a common wolf spider, which closely resemble funnel weavers. It's almost a toss-up. I can't tell from the resolution of your photograph, but funnel weavers have spiny legs whereas the wolf spider has smooth legs and has a bit more of a difference in the comparative size of the abdomen to thorax. Wolf spider (coloration varies) vs. funnel weaver ...



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