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16

Easy: look at images of hairless cats. You will see they can be not only all black, but also grey, spotted, pink, and a few other rarer colors.


3

I think you are misunderstanding "color" here. When applied to cats, it doesn't literally mean a color shade as used in color theory, but "coat color" which can in fact also be a "coat pattern". The cats above are two-colored, not three-colored. One color is white. The other color is what is called "tabby" in English and is a pattern of dark spots arranged ...


6

The color of mammals is determined by the pigment melanin. More specifically it is the mixture of the dark brown to black Eumelanin and the red to yellow Pheomelanin. These pigments are made a specialized cell type called melanocytes, which are located in the hair follicles (when they pigment the hairs) and in the skin. Some animals (like mice) almost ...


6

This source seems to suggest that cats' skin colour is determined by their fur colour, as the same genes expressed in the fur which produce the colours (melanins) are also expressed in the skin. The density of melanin can vary from one part of the body to another, down to patterns within individual hairs or gradients across skin, thus accounting for a ...


2

Diabetes mellitus is divided into four type 1, type 2, gestational diabetes, and specific type of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is commonly called as Juvenile diabetes or Brittle diabetes. It is also called as "Insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM)". For our bad-luck the causes of Type 1 diabetes remains obscure, and scientists believes its mostly related ...


1

We work a bit with pain and memory. My understanding is that you can measure what in behavioral field is called "pain" by detecting aversive response of an animal. That is there is always something unpleasant and attractive in nature. Only difference is that pungent smell will not kill subject. Evolution taught animals that bad smells and loud sounds might ...


6

Pain is subjective Pain is a subjective experience; you cannot even tell with certainty how much pain your fellow human is experiencing, which is why we ask people; they then can tell us. Pain relief (both physical and emotional) is a significant part of medicine, yet we still have "pain scales" for self-reported pain, one of the more common ones being the ...


3

To avoid confusion I just want to add to fileunderwater's answer the equivalent words we use to describe the "area size a population/species lives in". The spatial range a single individual occupies is generally called home range or territory (as fileunderwater said before me). The spatial range a single species (or population) occupies is called ...


6

Are you looking for 'Home range' (see also the definition in Encyclopaedia Britannica)? Generally, 'home range' is defined as the entire area an individual animal uses, while the 'territory' is the subset of the home range that is actually defended from conspecifics (in animals that show territoriality). 'Home range' is often delimited by the types of ...


2

Its a Shrew skull.                                             Hainault Forest Website Photographs by © Brian Ecott


6

The short answer, which has already been pointed out by user137, is that females are diploid while males are haploid. Bees do not have sex chromosomes per se; rather sex is determined by the csd gene on chromosome III (csd stands for complementary sex determination). Diploid bees that are heterozygous at the csd locus (i.e. contain two different alleles ...


3

Preamble: This is a rather unsatisfying answer I'm afraid. I can't seem to find any animal that has exceptional eyesight and sees in monochrome. Even though machines cope better with shapes rather than colours, it generally seems like animals that rely on exceptional eyesight to survive tend to see in colour and have other neurological systems to ease "data ...


1

Most marine mammals, some nocturnal mammals, and some fossorial mammals are monochromats -- meaning they see in what is effectively greyscale. As previous commentators have mentioned, quantifying visual acuity is not a trivial matter. Still, I'd assume that under many measures a species such as the owl monkey--a monochromat--has quite good vision, at least ...


7

Creep is correct. I sent an email asking this question to The Tortoise Group, which is a non-profit organization whose mission statement is: Improving the lives of wild and desert tortoises through education. The Executive Director replied: It's a bale for turtles and a creep for tortoises. I am sure they could have come up with a better name! If ...


3

What I found was that creep is a collective noun. The professor Peter Trudgill uses the word in a chapter about collective nouns and the example is of tortoises. I don't know what book to tell you to look in though. He is professor of sociolinguistics. From a search on collective nouns for animals, turtles, and reptiles, I only found turtles having the ...


3

I think it's a Gordian worm or more accurately known as Spinochordodes tellinii . Good music for a parasitic event like that by the way. Nematomorpha is the phylum. If your a molecular guy, check out Spinochordodes tellinii and the WNT pathway, pretty cool stuff.



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