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Jan
5
awarded  Commentator
Jan
5
comment Can someone identify this ant?
Yes, I'm aware that it is also possibly a Pheidologeton diversus, renamed nowadays as Carebara diversa, if I'm not mistaken. Unfortunately, without successfully starting a colony and looking at all the different casts, it's rather hard to tell the C. diversa and C. affinis apart. IIRC from my research, the C. diversa has a more diverse range of worker sizes, ranging from super majors (with really big heads) to minors. C. diversa are also rarer than C. affinis, which makes the C. diversa highly prized as pet ants. There are even reports of sellers selling C. affinis as C. diversa knowingly.
Sep
28
awarded  Nice Question
Sep
24
revised Can someone identify this ant?
added 493 characters in body
Sep
23
comment Can someone identify this ant?
@fileunderwater Thanks for the tips! I'll try to get clearer pictures or count the setae, etc myself when I get home.
Sep
23
revised Can someone identify this ant?
added 25 characters in body
Sep
23
revised Can someone identify this ant?
added 25 characters in body
Sep
23
revised Can someone identify this ant?
More photos, more details
Sep
22
awarded  Yearling
Sep
22
revised Can someone identify this ant?
deleted 3 characters in body
Sep
22
asked Can someone identify this ant?
Sep
15
awarded  Tumbleweed
Sep
8
asked How quickly can lasers of various wavelengths and powers impair human vision or cause pain in the eyes?
Aug
16
comment Do “virgin” ant queens ever shed their wings?
The queenless species in question seems to be Pristomyrmex punctatus (a.k.a. Pristomyrmex pungens): researchgate.net/publication/… ant.edb.miyakyo-u.ac.jp/BE/Kingdom/2425/2425e.html
Aug
16
comment Do “virgin” ant queens ever shed their wings?
Actually, the thought just occurred to me that, just because a species can reproduce sexually, it doesn't mean it must reproduce sexually: what if in some species, the virgin queen can still lay eggs that are just clones of herself? She would still get her army or workers. I think I have read about one species in Japan where there is no queen and all workers just lay their own eggs that are clones of themselves. So it doesn't seem like a total impossibility for queens in other species to do the same. In fact, are we even sure that queens always have enough sperm reserve for her lifetime?
Aug
14
asked Do “virgin” ant queens ever shed their wings?
Jul
28
comment There aren't any animals like hornets that hunt large prey (like a rabbit, or even up to a deer), right? Why not?
@JackAidley It's actually quite possible for the wasps to swarm and remain undetectable to a rabbit. The rabbit's hearing range is about 360 Hz to 42 kHz. Meanwhile, wasps beat their wings at around 200 Hz, so the sound of their flight would probably be undetectable to the rabbit. As far as sight goes, wasps are small and they can easily hide in foliage. Behaviour-wise, wasps and bees are known to have already evolved coordinated attacks against intruders, so it shouldn't be hard to evolve into a hunting strategy as long as there is an actual advantage.
Jul
25
answered Why is there a seeming dichotomy between mobility and photosynthesis?
Jul
25
comment There aren't any animals like hornets that hunt large prey (like a rabbit, or even up to a deer), right? Why not?
While it is true that rabbits and deers run faster than hornets can fly, I'm not entirely convinced that speed is really a problem. All the hypothetical hornets/wasps need to do is to gather around the rabbit without disturbing the rabbit, and then go all in at the same time, before the rabbit has time to react.
Jul
25
comment There aren't any animals like hornets that hunt large prey (like a rabbit, or even up to a deer), right? Why not?
@jamesqf In case you think sting victims who die only die of allergy reaction (anaphylactic shock), some species of hornets actually have a sting that contains neurotoxins, and some can cause kidney failure. E.g.: the Asian giant hornet