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location Berlin, Germany
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visits member for 1 year, 9 months
seen Dec 22 '13 at 10:35

Sep
20
revised Does culling badgers restrict the spread of bovine tuberculosis?
added detail
Sep
20
revised Does culling badgers restrict the spread of bovine tuberculosis?
added detail
Sep
20
awarded  Investor
Sep
20
answered Does culling badgers restrict the spread of bovine tuberculosis?
Sep
20
awarded  Promoter
Sep
20
asked What is the effect of garlic on intestinal flora?
Sep
20
answered How are melatonin levels measured in humans?
Sep
19
comment Are there yearly variations in HIOMT (HydroxyIndole-O-MethylTransferase) availability?
usually the author of a book gives references for all quoted statements.
Sep
19
comment Are some non-coding RNA spliced?
can you give some reference, please?
Sep
19
comment Help with designing the analysis of radio telemetry study
Yes, but I think the idea of comparing the data without plants with data that include plants is the right idea. Have you only measurements where plants are in the vicinity? Then only a realistic simulation of movement in the absence of plants can be a good model for comparison. But maybe someone else has already created a good simulation?
Sep
19
answered Survival of E. coli on agar plate at -20 degree C without glycerol stock
Sep
18
awarded  Enlightened
Sep
17
answered How many human proteins are very well characterized?
Sep
17
comment What specifically allows alpha-complementation in beta-galactosidase?
Two other (free) papers on beta-gal complementation and other split reporter systems: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC2835542 ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC137764
Sep
17
comment What specifically allows alpha-complementation in beta-galactosidase?
Maybe this review is a good start: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22070901
Sep
16
comment Why is most tissue cellular?
Also, I wouldn't trust anything artificial longer than 100 years, from experience. Eventually something gives, and then where is the repairman if it cannot repair itself like a cell that simply divides to survive?
Sep
16
comment Why is most tissue cellular?
Yes and yes, by their physical and chemical properties and those of their content, respectively. Because evolution started with cells and it proved the best solution over the years. And there is even enough evidence to see why it all starts with cells: because lipids will form spheres by themselves in water, with or without content. It's just the physical optimum.
Sep
16
revised Why is most tissue cellular?
not restricted to humans
Sep
16
answered Why is most tissue cellular?
Sep
16
comment Which poison makes seastars inedible to possible predators?
That is the other factor of success. But they are really poisonous, see the answer.