4,860 reputation
1435
bio website nicolaromano.net
location Montpellier, France
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen 2 days ago

I'm a researcher in neuroendocrinology

I'm interested in all that regards pattern recognition, time series analysis, rhythms etc.

My current research focuses in the exploration and modulation of the neuro-endocrine patterns that contribute to the generation of hormone pulsatility.


Oct
5
comment Does our DNA change during our lives?
I see the question as much more general. "Does DNA change during our lives?". The answer is yes. Schizofrenia is meant to be just as an example...
Oct
4
comment Does our DNA change during our lives?
sorry, but how can you say that it is impossible for a drug to affect a foetus so that it becomes schizophrenic? I can see many biologically plausible mechanism for that. Your answer is misleading because you are saying that the effect of the drug "can absolutely under no conditions be passed on to your child". Which is not necessarily true.
Oct
4
comment Does our DNA change during our lives?
@terdon: I doubt there is a specific change for "piano playing ability", but I would not be that surprised whether there were changes to, say, genes involved in neurotransmission in cognitive areas of the brain. As for whether epigenetics changes are or not changes to DNA... well definitely methylation of DNA is a change to the DNA, that is really not debatable. I guess that strictly speaking histone modification are modifications of chromatin and not DNA, but that's nitpicking...
Oct
4
comment Does our DNA change during our lives?
@terdon: see my comments to vonMises's answer. Epigenetic changes to the genome happen because of environmental changes, mutation is not the only way to change genetic information.
Oct
4
comment Does our DNA change during our lives?
Mutation is random, and that is the only way DNA can change.. This is not true. Mutation is not necessarily random, mutagens may be more or less selective. Also, again, mutation is not the only way DNA can change, there are plenty of epigenetic changes that can play a big role in shaping behaviours. Just as an example, you may want to have a look at this paper: ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22941276
Oct
4
comment Does our DNA change during our lives?
A person who becomes schizophrenic because of drug use does not become any more prone to having schizophrenic kids than a person who doesnt do drugs. This is not that obvious. First, if drugs are taken during pregnancy/nursing they may as well influence the child. Second it is now well known that many drug can produce epigenetic modifications that, in certain situations, can be transmitted transgenerationally.
Oct
1
comment How do rodenticides with delayed effect work?
Not sure about the specifics of rodenticides but you should take into consideration that a drug may not be directly bioavailable. It may be given as an inactive form which is metabolized to the active form. It may be retained in adipose tissue and slowly released. Also, the effect which may be fairly rapid, but not immediately fatal. If I remember correctly rodenticides are often anticoaugulants, so the effect may not be immediatly obvious.
Oct
1
comment Is evolution true as Darwin said?
You may want to look at the excellent series of links reported here: skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/2057/…
Sep
29
comment What non invasive methods of estimating Body Time are there?
Don't forget cortisol/corticosterone!
Sep
28
comment Deducing synaptic strength from electron micrographs?
@WYSIWYG: I would be extremely wary of using such approach... you should really combine it with some ephys.
Sep
27
comment Changing the definition of life?
well, I do not know many people who think genes are alive...
Sep
23
comment Changing the definition of life?
it's not really the "parasite" part which is important, but rather the fact that they are obligate, i.e. they cannot reproduce by themselves, they need a host to do that.
Sep
23
comment Harmful effects of radiation from cell phone towers?
The answer is that there is no conclusive proof one way or another. I answered a very similar question here: skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/6566/…
Sep
23
comment What are some readily available, easy to test, bacteria?
What does "easy to test" mean? Do you want to check if it is there or if it does something?
Sep
22
comment Why does shaving dehydrate the skin? Is there an hormonal effect involved?
@Rustyn Yazdanpour: I would assume it is just a local reaction, otherwise all of your skin would be affected, which is not the case... My take (but I may be wrong) is that it is just a side effect of the inflammation (e.g. some interleukins can cause dry skin).
Sep
22
comment What is the chemical composition of an egg shell?
@Rustyn Yazdanpour: I doubt you'll get acetate from olive oil... it would rather come from the reaction terdon wrote (where he omitted acetate ions). In any case no worry about that either, although there are definitely much better uses for eggshell (composting for instance).
Sep
22
comment Why does shaving dehydrate the skin? Is there an hormonal effect involved?
Hmmmm... any special reason that makes you think hormones are involved?
Sep
22
comment What would life expectancy be in the western world in the absence of Ischemic heart disease?
You may want to play a little bit with this: theguardian.com/news/datablog/interactive/2012/dec/13/…
Sep
18
comment Changing the definition of life?
"They don't seem to qualify as parasites": they do, they are obligate intracellular parasites.
Sep
18
comment Changing the definition of life?
@MiguelÁngelNaranjoOrtiz: I disagree. The "classic" point against viruses being alive is that they are obligate intracellular parasites. That said, even if cellularity (whatever that means) was the "rule" for being alive that surely would not be because "we want to exclude viruses". There are definitions of life and virus may or may not fit into them, but to say (without bringing any proof whatsoever) that the definition is made specifically to exclude viruses sounds very unscientific to me...