5,202 reputation
1435
bio website nicolaromano.net
location Edinburgh, United Kingdom
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Jul 19 at 14:11

I'm a researcher in neuroendocrinology

I'm interested in all that regards pattern recognition, time series analysis, rhythms etc.

My current research focuses in the exploration and modulation of the neuro-endocrine patterns that contribute to the generation of hormone pulsatility.


Sep
22
comment What is the chemical composition of an egg shell?
@Rustyn Yazdanpour: I doubt you'll get acetate from olive oil... it would rather come from the reaction terdon wrote (where he omitted acetate ions). In any case no worry about that either, although there are definitely much better uses for eggshell (composting for instance).
Sep
22
comment Why does shaving dehydrate the skin? Is there an hormonal effect involved?
Hmmmm... any special reason that makes you think hormones are involved?
Sep
22
comment What would life expectancy be in the western world in the absence of Ischemic heart disease?
You may want to play a little bit with this: theguardian.com/news/datablog/interactive/2012/dec/13/…
Sep
18
comment Changing the definition of life?
"They don't seem to qualify as parasites": they do, they are obligate intracellular parasites.
Sep
18
comment Changing the definition of life?
@MiguelÁngelNaranjoOrtiz: I disagree. The "classic" point against viruses being alive is that they are obligate intracellular parasites. That said, even if cellularity (whatever that means) was the "rule" for being alive that surely would not be because "we want to exclude viruses". There are definitions of life and virus may or may not fit into them, but to say (without bringing any proof whatsoever) that the definition is made specifically to exclude viruses sounds very unscientific to me...
Sep
7
comment diameter = dia?
For instance: biology.stackexchange.com/questions/7364/… biology.stackexchange.com/questions/9890/… biology.stackexchange.com/questions/9427/…
Sep
7
comment diameter = dia?
We would not close a question asking what is the correct abbreviation for micrometers would we? This is exactly the same thing... voting to reopen.
Sep
7
comment diameter = dia?
@WYSIWYG: it is about well defined scientific jargon, it is not a matter of personal preference.
Sep
2
comment Reference for writing an International journal in micro-biology/micro-organism field
Agree with the other comment. Choose a journal and then check their guidelines, they can vary a lot even in the same field. And this should maybe be migrated to Academia.SE
Aug
29
comment When can a virus modify DNA in every cell of a living organism?
Note that in the type of experiments you are referring to (for instance look for "in vivo optogenetics") you generally do NOT want to infect all of the neurons in the brain, but rather a very specific subpopulation. This is achieved by using various strategies, which essentially depend on the presence of specific DNA sequences in the virus or in the target neurons. Also, if you do this in adult animals, the virus will only infect cells around the site at which it has been injected.
Aug
20
comment Why doesn't human consumption of plants cause infectious diseases the way consumption of animals can?
The classical example of fungal toxins are aflatoxins, which are very nasty.
Aug
19
comment Biological/molecular basis of nutritional need differences between blood types?
There is no scientific basis for blood-type diet. See skeptics.stackexchange.com/questions/189/… and skepdic.com/bloodtypediet.html
Aug
14
comment Why do I always close my eyes when someone takes a photo of me using a flash?
@kmm: I added some more explanation
Aug
14
comment Why do I always close my eyes when someone takes a photo of me using a flash?
@kmm: it is definitely a good question. I am not sure how does the opthalmic branch of the trigeminal sense light... What is always reported is that the trigeminal is the afferent pathway and the facial nerve is the efferent pathway (which moves the eyelid), with some brainstem processing in the middle. Interestingly, the photic sneeze reflex (i.e. sneezing when looking at the Sun) is derived by activation of the same pathway. I am a bit busy at the moment, but I'll try to expand the answer later if I find a better explanation.
Aug
14
comment What happens if we continuously stimulate a mimosa plant?
Could you expand on the specific stimulus you are talking about? I am not familiar with the behaviour of mimosa plants...
Aug
13
comment Is there a realtime molecular clock within the genome to co-ordinate the developmental sequences in an embryo?
Ok, now I understand what you mean. In general when speaking about "molecular clock" one refers to a set of genes and their derived proteins that govern circadian rhythms and that indeed act as a "24h timer". See also my explanation here: biology.stackexchange.com/questions/2299/… . Now, although these genes are involved in circadian (~24h) rhythms, they possibly also have a role in shorter (<24h, ultradian) and longer (>24h infradian) rhythms, although this is still very much an unresolved question.
Aug
13
comment Is there a realtime molecular clock within the genome to co-ordinate the developmental sequences in an embryo?
You think it is difficult to believe that development is only timed by molecular events, but you are asking whether there is a molecular clock? Seems a bit contradicting... Anyway it has been shown that disruption of clock genes leads to developmental defects: for instance (these are just two random papers I found, but there is surely more) ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22884368 ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17963275
Aug
12
comment How do I figure out which of the valleys I came from?
Does 23andme sequence the whole DNA? I thought they were only looking for specific SNPs. Anyway, maybe this can answer part of your questions customercare.23andme.com/forums/20881310-Maternal-Paternal-Line
Aug
7
comment Randomness in living systems
@Remi.b: don't get me wrong, I find the question very interesting. I think at the end it all comes down to the definition of "randomness" which one wants to use. Is a random event something that is too complex to predict? Or is it something even with infinite computing power we could never predict?
Aug
7
comment Randomness in living systems
I find your computer example inconsistent with the rest of the question. If you are not interested in randomness at the molecular/sub-mulecular level, then you can say that, as PRNG in computers, also biological processes are deterministic. You make a "random" choice between A and B because (as an extremely simplistic example) your neuron "A" fired more than your neuron "B"...