5,441 reputation
1436
bio website nicolaromano.net
location Edinburgh, United Kingdom
age 33
visits member for 2 years, 8 months
seen Aug 6 at 13:32

I'm a researcher in neuroendocrinology

I'm interested in all that regards pattern recognition, time series analysis, rhythms etc.

My current research focuses in the exploration and modulation of the neuro-endocrine patterns that contribute to the generation of hormone pulsatility.


Aug
13
comment Is there a realtime molecular clock within the genome to co-ordinate the developmental sequences in an embryo?
Ok, now I understand what you mean. In general when speaking about "molecular clock" one refers to a set of genes and their derived proteins that govern circadian rhythms and that indeed act as a "24h timer". See also my explanation here: biology.stackexchange.com/questions/2299/… . Now, although these genes are involved in circadian (~24h) rhythms, they possibly also have a role in shorter (<24h, ultradian) and longer (>24h infradian) rhythms, although this is still very much an unresolved question.
Aug
13
comment Is there a realtime molecular clock within the genome to co-ordinate the developmental sequences in an embryo?
You think it is difficult to believe that development is only timed by molecular events, but you are asking whether there is a molecular clock? Seems a bit contradicting... Anyway it has been shown that disruption of clock genes leads to developmental defects: for instance (these are just two random papers I found, but there is surely more) ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22884368 ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/17963275
Aug
12
comment How do I figure out which of the valleys I came from?
Does 23andme sequence the whole DNA? I thought they were only looking for specific SNPs. Anyway, maybe this can answer part of your questions customercare.23andme.com/forums/20881310-Maternal-Paternal-Line
Aug
7
comment Randomness in living systems
@Remi.b: don't get me wrong, I find the question very interesting. I think at the end it all comes down to the definition of "randomness" which one wants to use. Is a random event something that is too complex to predict? Or is it something even with infinite computing power we could never predict?
Aug
7
comment Randomness in living systems
I find your computer example inconsistent with the rest of the question. If you are not interested in randomness at the molecular/sub-mulecular level, then you can say that, as PRNG in computers, also biological processes are deterministic. You make a "random" choice between A and B because (as an extremely simplistic example) your neuron "A" fired more than your neuron "B"...
Aug
6
comment Is Diabetes sex linked disease
@Oreotrephes: sex-linked just means that it depends on some gene present on the sexual chromosomes (chromosomes X and Y), so that it is not passed equally in the progeny (e.g. a gene on the Y chromosome will not influence females, who are XX). I would also like to add that epigenetics plays a very important role in the development of diabetes.
Aug
4
comment Non toxic low melting point alloy
@tig: right, did not think about that
Aug
4
comment Can rats pass on memories of a maze to their offspring?
Very interesting! I have not had the time to read through the article yet, so I do not know whether they address this, but I wonder what happens if then you expose those 4th generation birds to birds that sing normally. Who would they choose? A screeching one or a singing one?
Aug
4
comment Do body lotions enter into bloodstream of people? And how do they do it?
To complete, I would add that the issue here is that the skin is composed by a mix of hydrophilic (="water-loving") and hydrofobic (="fat-loving") layers, so a water-based lotion will pass easily through the former and much less easily through the latter, and the opposite is true for a fat-based lotion. PS: just a little note on your first sentence: lotions are not drugs, they are formulations, like a pill or a spray. You can use lotions as a formulation for drugs.
Aug
4
comment Do body lotions enter into bloodstream of people? And how do they do it?
Surely they go in, that is the principle by which topically applied drugs work!
Aug
3
comment Botulinum Toxin
Denaturation is a naturally occuring process and it works pretty much like radioactive decay.... hmmmm.... no it is not. Radioactive decay is irreversible, denaturation is not, as renaturation can occurr.
Aug
3
comment What triggers DNA to produce proteins?
@Alan Boyd: I think the question is asking what environmental signals act to recruit TF to start transcription. For instance activation of membrane receptors and so on.
Aug
3
comment Effect of applying fungicide to a field
You should probably specify your question a little bit better. For instance which specific fungicide are you interested in (there are many which act with different mechanisms)? What amount ? In which period of corn life cycle? I doubt that you could receive a clear answer otherwise...
Aug
3
comment Why are there so many medicinal plants?
I think you may be kind of falling in the trap of "if it is there there is a reason"... How many other chemicals are present in the same plant that do not have an action on humans? Just because one specific compound interacts with a protein in humans it does not mean it evolved for that reason. You should consider that s.a. has a very simple aromatic structure, and it is not surprising that it can interact with other proteins than the plants endogenous ones. In any case, when taken in large amounts, s.a. is indeed toxic, so in the specific case, explanation #3 would still stand.
Aug
3
comment Non toxic low melting point alloy
Rather than a metallurgist I would probably ask a jeweler... they should definitely know what they are allowed to use.
Aug
3
comment All or none phenomenon
Are the stimuli arriving all at the same time or sequentially? If the latter, how far apart? You may want to look at this: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Summation_%28neurophysiology%29
Aug
1
comment Is there a difference between pig and cow anatomy that makes religious slaughter of the latter less painful?
This could be extended as well to other religions, such as Islamic dhabīḥah
Aug
1
comment Do crocodiles age?
@Good Gravy: [un]fortunately in biology definitions are extremely important. In any case let's stick to the question, which states that they die, i.e. they are not immortal. The question is whether they do not age which is a completely different thing biologically speaking. For instance, do crocodiles show signs of cellular aging, like telomeres shortening? Sorry but if we want to talk about elves or Highlanders I am very happy to do it, just not on a biology Q&A site. As I said before, I have nothing against MCM answer, just pointing out that the term immortal is misplaced here.
Jul
31
comment The role of antibodies interacting with cancer
We also need to specify that "cancer" is not ONE illness but a series of very different pathologies with very different etiology and development. What is true for one cancer may not be true for another one, so it is always difficult to generalise.
Jul
31
comment What is a cortical circuit?
@user815423426: I don't think a distinction between white and gray matter is really necessary in this case. The fibers that compose the white matter come from neurons, so they can still be part of a circuit. "Cortex" refers to the outer layer of the brain, which is connected to many other parts of the brain (for instance connections between neurons in the cortex and neurons in the thalamus will form cortico-thalamic circuits, and so on). Of course you can also have purely cortical circuits (i.e. connection of neurons in the cortex between each other)