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Apr
26
comment Is “A” inhibiting “B” and vice-versa, a positive feedback loop?
@Kelvin -- I don't think there's much room to disagree. In the context of Biology a Positive Feedback Loop has a distinct definition; an increase in A leads to an increase in B, whose product or byproduct leads to an increase in A in an (IIRC) exponential fashion until a limiting factor is involved.
Feb
15
awarded  Enlightened
Feb
15
awarded  Nice Answer
Feb
2
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
27
comment How is HIV evolutionarily viable despite its extreme virulence?
@Anonstudent You might be thinking of the rate of mortality or pathogenecity (rate an infection causes a disease) -- which also aren't always selected against. There are many niches to fill between the extremes.
Dec
5
revised How are isovolumetric contraction and afterload related in the cardiac cycle?
Edited for clarity in the English language.
Oct
9
comment Can we change one's genome into the genome of somebody else
No, that would be practically impossible with modern technology. The explanation is pretty lengthy, but do you have specific questions or a certain method you were thinking of that could be more concretely addressed?
Oct
1
comment Why can't we use plasmids to add genes to ourselves?
IIRC humans have several mechanisms that digest extra-nuclear DNA. Unfortunately I don't have a reference handy, but I'm 95% sure any plasmid would just be destroyed.
Sep
23
comment How do we perceive acceleration?
@Dexter -- The doppler effect comes into play with echoes made by your bike's motor, too, and other sounds as you passed by their origins.
Sep
23
comment How do we perceive acceleration?
@AliceD - "the endolympth and otoliths..." I specified both. The otoliths are partially responsible. The vestibular system is designed to track 3-axial movement (XYZ), and the frequency of action potentials changes depending on how many hairs are open and how "open" they are. Unless I'm very, very incorrect, the vestibular system tracks acceleration in addition to vector.
Sep
22
comment How do we perceive acceleration?
@Dexter -- The doppler effect is the change in pitch of a sound due to the velocity of its source. If the source of a noise is moving, the sound waves in the direction of its velocity/acceleration are condensed (higher pitched), and those in the opposing direction are elongated (lower pitch). You can tell if something is heading towards or away based on that. A classic example are race cars or racing bikes, whose engine noises change pitch to an observer despite constant speeds: youtube.com/watch?v=qyxvPiOqEiE
Sep
22
answered How do we perceive acceleration?
Sep
21
comment Why are there so many different humans yet chimpanzees are just chimpanzees?
Could you re-phrase your question? Are you asking why we don't find/identify more fossils of Pan ancestors?
Sep
21
comment Why are there so many different humans yet chimpanzees are just chimpanzees?
The rest you listed that are not Homo sapiens are evolutionary ancestors of humans. Not humans. Close to humans? Sure, some of them. But not humans.
Sep
18
comment How do I offer a generous gift to sweet-seeking wasps, bees, hornets, bumble-bees?
So... you're looking for something you can have on-hand that will entice wasps and bees to follow it so you don't have to swat at them?
Sep
8
comment Can the third sex be categorized as Male or Female?
@Remi.b -- The missing SRY gene in a phenotypical male with XX chromosomes is a really interesting exception to the general rule I described above. Thanks for bringing it up in the comments! I didn't know it existed.
Sep
3
comment What kind of larvae are these?
Not a bug guy, but it does look like termites.
Aug
8
awarded  Yearling
Jul
25
comment Do the enzymes and compounds in saliva help with stain removal?
Amylase doesn't break down proteins. It breaks down amylopectin -- a type of starch (sugar) molecule. Proteins are broken down by proteases (not found in saliva or semen), and many available stain removers use proteases.
Jul
23
awarded  Nice Answer