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1133
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location Salt Lake City, UT
age 30
visits member for 2 years, 5 months
seen 11 hours ago

Graduated with a B.S. in Biology, Minors in Chemistry and English Literature from the University of Utah.


Jan
22
comment Is there any tree or other plant that produces a new crop in fast cycles?
@twelve -- I'd suggest something like gardening.stackexchange.com for people more knowledgeable than I. I'm a novice gardener, but from what I recall most people would need 2-3 basil plants to cover moderate to heavy use of the herb in their cooking from early spring through early fall (in climates where temperatures drop below freezing).
Jan
22
comment Is there any tree or other plant that produces a new crop in fast cycles?
Several harvests occur from most agricultural plants, most have 2-3 harvest periods per year, with a few exceptions. I'm not aware of any plant that produces a new crop every month; the closest I can think of would be herbs like Basil -- but that's because it produces continuously until it goes dormant.
Jan
22
comment True or false & fill in the blanks
@canadianer -- I agree, the nomenclature is pretty arbitrary and can be misleading. Thanks for bringing it up. :-)
Jan
22
comment True or false & fill in the blanks
@canadianer -- Yeah, but the nomenclature conventions make "polypeptides" to usually 3-5 peptides chained together. Before is "dipeptide" and after can get up to "oligilopeptide" IIRC.
Jan
18
comment how do macrophages have the capacity to digest pathogen in opsonization
There are multiple mechanisms to induce phagocytosis by macrophages. One includes B-cell antibodies (specifically the Fc region) and another includes chemokines emitted by local cells that can also induce phagocytosis. I do not have my material with me at the moment, but the short answer is: Macrophages can do both. They can eat pathogens without antibody stimulation, but antibodies can also stimulate them into action.
Jan
16
comment Father with mutated gene for mtDNA- why isn't his offspring at risk?
@anongoodnurse "Paternal Inheritance of Mitochondrial DNA in Mice" - Nature 1991. The truth is that some paternal mtDNA is passed along, but the undergrad level generalization is that "no" paternal mtDNA is passed because the amount is practically non-existent outside of rare cases. In those rare cases then mtDNA can cause metabolic issues, like the 28 year old case study by Scwhartz in 2002.
Oct
2
comment How long does a signal from the brain take to reach the limbs?
@Christian - Roughly half, I'd assume. A full reflex arc is from a sensory neuron to the spinal column and back out to the muscles. The difference is probably due to length and the added junctions.
Oct
1
comment How long does a signal from the brain take to reach the limbs?
@shigeta - They're some overlap (the Vagus is a good example), but the function maps to the fiber type fairly well since space is the primary limiting factor for the peripheral system. However, I'll admit I haven't refreshed myself of the topic for a while, so it's possible the ratios are less strict than I believe.
Sep
25
comment What is a catalytic domain of an enzyme?
AFAIK MattDMo is correct. The catalytic site is the active site where the reaction takes place that triggers the conformation change. He is also correct about there being nearly infinite potential catalytic site designs.
Sep
7
comment Why do we absorb vitamins better from whole foods than from pills?
@user6035 - Yes, you could eat an artificial diet of macronutrients and micronutrients that would satisfy your biochemical needs. It would probably be "healthy" in that you would probably continue to live without issues you weren't already predisposed to. How other chemicals and compounds contribute to our health are unknown (think antioxidants), but have the potential to contribute significantly. However, please consult medical professionals for further info if you intend to pursue this. Due to genetic variation your body might have greater or lesser needs than the recommendations.
Aug
13
comment How does strength of a pulse related to EKG(ECG)?
Predict? I have no idea. I know V-tach and A-tach can be reasonably predicted by increasingly chaotic signals on an EKG, but I don't think the equipment would have the granularity to predict "strong" and "weak" beats.
Aug
13
comment What is the point of having evolved two nostrils?
I doubt it's so much that two nostrils are that much more beneficial than one as much as that most complex organisms follow bilateral symmetry for their body design. That said, your body will clog one and keep the other clear during fevers, allergies, or when it's cold to prevent it from drying out completely.
Jul
11
comment Why are men stronger than women?
@QuoraFeans - I re-answered the question to better fit what I think you're looking for.
Jul
5
comment Why are men stronger than women?
@pbond - If a woman performs strength training she will struggle to come even close to the weights the average male gym rat can lift (end quote) ::: Aside from very specific exercises (like the bench press), women only trail men by about 20% at Olympic levels. I guess that depends on your definition of "close", but rest assured if a woman chooses to take strength training seriously she definitely has the potential to outperform your average gym rat.
Jul
4
comment Why are men stronger than women?
@QuoraFeans - Then ask your question again, and be more precise. You're asking why the genders diverged in capacity for muscle development, and I answered that the theories involve Female-Selection for stronger men and that men acted as the defenders/hunters. What type of answer are you looking for?
Jul
4
comment Why are men stronger than women?
@QuoraFeans - You asked why women were weaker than men. The honest answer is that men only have more capacity for strength and potential for muscle mass - but most men will never use it, and it's cultural for women to want to be thin (which might be a minor influence of male-choice selection) - but both women and men are capable of being strong with training. If you're that unhappy with the answer, ask again with more specifics and I will try to answer again.
Jun
28
comment Can (any) human cells learn?
I'm not entirely sure what you're asking. What do you mean by "learn", and are you proposing a situation where the cells have somehow become removed from the body?
Jun
15
comment How are minerals formed by biological processes?
@daniel - Sorry, yes.
Jun
15
comment Is the sense for salt depending on the electrolyte level in our body?
@try-catch-finally - Regular "taste" is depolarization. For sodium that simply involves the influx of the ions over the cell membrane of the taste buds, and that will cause a depolarization without other mechanisms. That happens when you eat something with Sodium, regardless of what you taste. Taste is left up to interpretation in the brain, and the brain is great at ignoring stuff that doesn't really matter. If the drink tastes less salty, it wouldn't be the mechanism occurring - but it would be the mechanism occurring less often, or just as often but less noticed.
Jun
15
comment Is the sense for salt depending on the electrolyte level in our body?
@try-catch-finally - ;-) The desensitization is one potential reason. Subjective occurrences are pretty difficult to pin down. It could be short term desensitization, or your brain could simply be paying more attention to other ingredients (water) after such a long workout. If it's within a few hours then it's probably an attention modification - de/sensitization can work on that short a time scale, but not usually. I would say that the phenomenon is not related to your thesis. I'll add another comment.