270 reputation
16
bio website petr.pudlak.name
location Czech Republic
age
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
seen Aug 20 at 6:00

Jul
22
awarded  Nice Question
Jul
2
awarded  Curious
Aug
19
awarded  Yearling
Jun
25
revised Do fake wasp nests actually fool wasps?
added 85 characters in body
Jun
24
asked Do fake wasp nests actually fool wasps?
Jun
9
accepted Is human face more resistant to cold than other body parts?
May
14
comment Why do ants dig surface paths?
@terdon The surface that surrounds it flat, the structure is not. I'll try to make a better picture.
May
14
comment Why do ants dig surface paths?
@terdon The location is completely flat, and the ants walk inside the structure, so they're covered from both sides. Most these structures have only the side walls, but it looks like this one is being covered from the top as well at the ends. I'll try to find the place again to see if they'll eventually cover the whole path.
May
14
awarded  Editor
May
14
revised Why do ants dig surface paths?
edited title
May
14
comment Why do ants dig surface paths?
@terdon No, I'm quite sure they built it for some reasons. I've seen many of these structures on that place. You're right, I don't know if it's for their protection or for anything else.
May
14
asked Why do ants dig surface paths?
Apr
27
comment Why dogs move their noses when smelling?
A thorough answer, thanks. Could you please elaborate how the movement of nostrils helps to improve the perception of smells? In particular, my question is focused on the barely noticeable, shivering-like movement of dogs' nostrils. This can be observed when a dog tries to analyze a faint smell in the air coming from some distance - it stays completely still and only smells and moves its nostrils (as in the second part of the video).
Apr
25
asked Why dogs move their noses when smelling?
Jan
26
asked Is human face more resistant to cold than other body parts?
Dec
3
comment What mechanisms do animals living in groups (herds, packs, swarms) have against spreading contagious diseases?
That's very interesting. But I think the conclusion is not completely correct. I'd rather conclude that "based on the evidence, if wolves have mechanisms for avoiding the spread of those diseases, they're not 100% successful." It could be that they have such mechanisms, and without them, the mortality would be even higher. The last sentence is an intriguing point. Perhaps from evolutionary perspective it's better to let the whole pack/herd become infected and if it survives, all the survivors will be immune.
Dec
3
asked What mechanisms do animals living in groups (herds, packs, swarms) have against spreading contagious diseases?
Aug
23
awarded  Scholar
Aug
23
accepted Does making yogurt from non-pasteurized milk work against possible disease bacteria?
Aug
19
awarded  Student