814 reputation
521
bio website migdal.wikidot.com/en
location Castelldefels, Spain
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 4 months
seen Mar 29 at 18:11

A PhD student in Theoretical Quantum Optics at ICFO. Alumnus of Physics and Mathematics at the University of Warsaw. Interested in quantum optics & quantum information, applied optics and mathematical modeling in psychology. Dedicated to education of gifted schoolchildren (as both tutor and organizer). In free time enjoys photography, hiking and psychology (esp. cognitive science).


Jan
24
comment What are the trajectories of flying insects?
@MartaCz-C: Abstraction sometimes helps (I am a physicists). And properties of the trajectory are very likely in a close relationship both to optimizing certain actions (avoiding predators, looking for prey, finding new habitat patch etc.) while being bounded by constrains (physiological, energy, ...).
Jan
23
comment How do cockroaches resist the effects of ionizing radiation?
While it's not my main topic I bet that (as I said) for all typical organic substances the shielding is ~mass/area. And as chitin has density of ~1.5g/cm^3 (ref) 1 cm of flesh is equivalent to ~7mm of chitin. So for radiation which is neither stopped nor transmitted by both, insects (unless they are extremely large) are less shielded. However, there may be some nuances and I think it makes I good question for physics.stackexchange.com.
Jan
23
comment What are the trajectories of flying insects?
Thanks, a good and informative answer. However, I am interested not only in saccades but the whole patterns of movement (so also structures at different time scales, e.g. minutes).
Jan
23
awarded  Nice Question
Jan
23
comment How do cockroaches resist the effects of ionizing radiation?
It is a very good answer. However, I have reservations when it comes to the last point (i.e. exoskeleton). First, I would bet that thin exoskeleton screen radiation much less than human skin (the total amount is proportional to cross-section, i.e. ~mass/area (given the same atomic composition), which is greater for the skin). Second, alpha particles are likely to be stopped by both (a few cm of air suffices), beta needs a few cm of flesh (depending on its energy) so it is likely harm all volume of insect but not of human and gamma radiation won't be stopped by neither exoskeleton nor skin.
Jan
22
awarded  Student
Jan
22
asked What are the trajectories of flying insects?
Jan
16
awarded  Supporter
Dec
15
awarded  Precognitive
Dec
15
awarded  Autobiographer