899 reputation
621
bio website migdal.wikidot.com/en
location Castelldefels, Spain
age 28
visits member for 2 years, 7 months
seen Jul 22 at 12:23

A PhD student in Theoretical Quantum Optics at ICFO. Alumnus of Physics and Mathematics at the University of Warsaw. Interested in quantum optics & quantum information, applied optics and mathematical modeling in psychology. Dedicated to education of gifted schoolchildren (as both tutor and organizer). In free time enjoys photography, hiking and psychology (esp. cognitive science).


Jun
13
comment Can we really 'discover' 85% of mammalian viruses?
Let us continue this discussion in chat.
Jun
13
comment Is there any measure by which the Germans today could be called a genetically superior race?
@dotancohen In any case, SE has no-dupe policy. So I guess unless you edit question, it will be closed. If you like my answer, could you edit it to ask about superiority of Germans, without speculations or relations to effectiveness of any eugenics? (In short: if there was some truth in Nazi propaganda on the genetic superiority of Germans) BTW: I didn't note your surname. :) With respect to topic notability - it is hard to miss a great number of scientific and cultural achievements (especially in the 20th century) due to people of Jewish ancestry.
Jun
13
comment Can we really 'discover' 85% of mammalian viruses?
I was thinking about 'outnerded' (it sounds right), but decided to go for 'overnerded' (compare: 'outpowered' vs 'overpowered'). But you are an expert on words here.
Jun
13
comment Can we really 'discover' 85% of mammalian viruses?
@daniel I feel overnerded by you (and thanks, it is always good to know). In any case, in the context of Stack Exchange (unlike fora, separating Q from A), I see people using OP when they mean Original Poster (as it is easy to refer to question as 'the question', or Q).
Jun
13
comment Is there any measure by which the Germans today could be called a genetically superior race?
@dotancohen Then if you mean than, it is a duplicate of Did the eugenics program in Nazi Germany have a measurable effect? (with answer: WW II with all of its killings, migrations, changes in economy and politics had much stronger impact, and most likely it is impossible to separate it). And no, Germans are not closer to Persians/Iranians than to Poles. This Aryan thing is a myth, not supported by science.
Jun
13
comment Can we really 'discover' 85% of mammalian viruses?
@daniel Fixed, thanks (sometimes I have issues with copy-paste). BTW: AFAIK OP means 'Original Poster' (i.e. you, in this context), not 'Original Post'.
Jun
13
comment Is there any measure by which the Germans today could be called a genetically superior race?
But in any case there is some overlap, so I would suggest to edit this question to remove this 'effectiveness of eugenics' part (since it is a dup). And in any case, saying "Is it true that X because of Y?" is much harder than "Is is true that X?". See my answer - an I am trying to answer only the simpler variant.
Jun
13
comment Is there any measure by which the Germans today could be called a genetically superior race?
@har-wradim For me it is not a duplicate. This question is not about the efficiency of Nazi eugenic programs, but about the intrinsic genetical superiority of German race (or lack of thereof).
Jun
13
comment Is there a good explanation for this swarming pattern?
It is a fascinating phenomenon. There is some research on swarming behaviour, see e.g. Collective motion, and in general some research by Tamas Vicsek and Ian Couzin research groups.
Jun
13
comment Chiral (a)symmetry of curly hair (and fur)
@daniel You are right that suggesting an answer was distracting. In any case, it seems there is no data. Maybe I should run a survey among friends or so. :)
May
6
comment Chiral (a)symmetry of curly hair (and fur)
I know that microscopic chirality is not needed to explain curly hair. The question is whether it plays any role, e.g. in shifting the ratio of clockwise and counter-clockwise curly hair from 1:1. (Thanks for the link, anyway; too bad for me that it is under a paywall).
Apr
10
comment Below which temperature human muscles don't work?
Thanks, especially for the last link. (I thought also about possibility that capillaries contract to much at lower temperatures, to support demand of muscles.)
Apr
10
comment Chiral (a)symmetry of curly hair (and fur)
Orders of magnitude difference of scale is not itself and argument against (see edit of my question).
Apr
8
comment Chiral (a)symmetry of curly hair (and fur)
@WYSIWYG Here keratin was only a guess. Chirality of intermediate fibers equally interesting to me. However the main question is: is proportion of left- and right-handed curly hair 1:1 in humans?
Dec
17
comment Is warmth/temperature sensed linearly or on a different scale?
Could you precise 'linearly'? In general, it is not a well-defined thing, when it comes to perception, see cogsci.stackexchange.com/questions/1751/…
Aug
21
comment Why did life not evolve to use radio?
See electrocommunication, weakly electric fish and Mormyridae. They use 500 Hz electric sine signals (however, AFAIK using conductance of water, not - electromagnetic waves).
Aug
17
comment Why did life not evolve to use radio?
A good point with amplification. For radio you want sine-wave amplifiers, not cascade amplifiers, so here there may be a problem as well. However, the first step is to have good wires...
Aug
16
comment Why did life not evolve to use radio?
Thermal noise is devastating for molecular devices, as detectors/emitters (two-level systems) are all the time saturated (so e.g. a photon has the same probability of being absorber and to steal excitation). For macroscopic currents there is no such mechanism and one can easily go beyond the thermal noise (so for animals its only a technical problem of getting good enough conductors and generators of high frequencies). Moreover, AFAIK water absorbs most of radio waves (it's why submarines use sonars, not - radars), so radio communication would work only for land animals.
Aug
15
comment Why did life not evolve to use radio?
You don't need a lot of energy to communicate anything. Anyway, radio and wifi works, so it's not a good argument.
Jul
20
comment How does the brain's energy consumption depend on mental activity?
I found Does Thinking Really Hard Burn More Calories? - Scientific American going in the same way - "Unlike physical exercise, mental workouts probably do not demand significantly more energy than usual. Believing we have drained our brains, however, may be enough to induce weariness".