6,911 reputation
21347
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location Marseille, France
age 34
visits member for 2 years, 3 months
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Elected moderator on Unix & Linux. Feel free to @ping me in chat if there's anything I can help you with.

I am a computational biologist with a background in biology, not computers. My PhD work was on gene prediction and comparative genomics but my current research is in systems biology, specifically protein-protein interaction networks.

profile for terdon on Stack Exchange, a network of free, community-driven Q&A sites


Feb
6
asked Which of the cell types commonly found in mammals has the greatest number of mitochondria?
Feb
6
revised What is meant in biology by the term “evolved”?
D'oh!
Feb
6
comment Identification of a mysterious lifeform, what is this?
Wow, the site is getting bigger, we actually already have a question about this insect (or a very close cousin), voting to close as a duplicate.
Feb
2
comment Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
While I see your point about there being races, I very much doubt you'll be able to support the use of the term as it tends to be used today. With the criteria you state, the Scots and the English would be different races, for example. If we take variations in vocalizations and geography as indications of race, each country will represent a race of its own. So while your argument does indeed support the existence of human races, it does not support the idea that those races are defined by color alone.
Feb
2
revised Transcribing DNA to mRNA with introns
deleted 31 characters in body
Jan
29
comment Evolutionary conservativeness
This is such a crappy question (not yours @biogirl, your teacher's). You cannot answer this question without actually checking the sequences. For example, the cell can survive without H1, OK, but H1 cannot function without it's structure since it's function is very dependent upon the structure. Therefore, it would not surprise me if it were exceedingly conserved. The question is an example of a lazy teacher, all you can offer is conjecture.
Jan
27
revised For people who work in microbiology labs, what software do you use to manage your strains?
typo in title
Jan
22
comment What does it mean when it's said so-and-so died a natural death?
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about and English idiom, not biology.
Jan
22
comment What does it mean when it's said so-and-so died a natural death?
This is not really a question about biology but about the English language and what is meant by a particular idiom. "Natural death" is not a biological term, it is a popular expression. Voting to close.
Jan
16
comment Why do farts stink, but perfume does not?
There are loads of "natural" things that smell good: flowers, food, your lover, your offspring, babies in general (at least to some people anyway), wood...
Jan
15
comment Is it possible for a human and another ape species to reproduce?
@ChinmayKanchi is it actually impossible or will it just lead to deformed offspring? Would an egg be fertilized and then die during development or is fertilization itself impossible?
Jan
15
comment Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
@Herman don't. You should edit your question in response to the answers you get. Your Q should always reflect what you are actually asking. I will look into this in more detail and update as soon as I get the chance.
Jan
14
comment Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
@Rodrigo yes, that was added after I posted this answer.
Jan
12
awarded  Nice Answer
Jan
12
revised Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
added 21 characters in body
Jan
11
comment Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
@JackAidley the statement is one I remember from university. Anecdotal evidence like that presented in my answer seems to confirm it and I was tought it years ago. I'll see if I can find a proper reference but it certainly looks to me like we have far far less variation than other species.
Jan
11
comment Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
@JackAidley birds of paradise are "natural" as far as that goes. In any case, the point is moot, whether the observed variation has been affected by humans or not, it is clear that the human species shows relatively little variation compared to what can be seen in others.
Jan
11
revised Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
deleted 2 characters in body
Jan
11
comment Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?
@Herman you're very welcome, if this answers your question, remember to mark it as accepted so the question can be marked as solved.
Jan
11
answered Do humans have enough biological differences to be grouped into races or subspecies?