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Nov
20
awarded  Popular Question
Nov
15
comment How do we know that humans and chimpanzees evolved from a common ape ancestor?
This is a circular argument. You cannot use a phylogenetic tree which is created based on the assumption of the evolutionary process as evidence of said process. You could make a good argument if you explained how that tree was made, that it is a map of genomic similarity. As it stands, your answer is not really proving anything, I'm afraid.
Nov
15
comment How do we know that humans and chimpanzees evolved from a common ape ancestor?
@jameslarge precisely. Facts lead to theories which lead to predictions which can be confirmed as fact after experimentation and/or observation. Theories can lead to facts but do not produce them.
Nov
15
revised How do we know that humans and chimpanzees evolved from a common ape ancestor?
http://english.stackexchange.com/q/118727/25030
Nov
11
awarded  Famous Question
Nov
8
comment Most painless method for killing insects
@fileunderwater well, you could always breathe at them. :P
Nov
7
comment How does the modern synthesis theory explain the evolution of birds from dinosaurs?
@MakotoKato well, for a clue, have a look at this answer about bats. Look at the gliding mice. You can imagine similar intermediate steps.
Nov
7
comment How does the modern synthesis theory explain the evolution of birds from dinosaurs?
@vervet as far as I know, that's not the case. I may be wrong though.
Nov
7
answered How does the modern synthesis theory explain the evolution of birds from dinosaurs?
Oct
30
reviewed Reject and Edit Unilateral damage to vagus nerve
Oct
30
revised Unilateral damage to vagus nerve
Retagged
Oct
20
revised mutations induced by transposons
Thanks and salutaions are not needed here, they are implied.
Oct
19
revised mutations induced by transposons
There is no D
Oct
16
comment Shortest path and influenza spread
Why would the shortest path be relevant? There is no reason for a virus to spread via the shortest path. For all you know, there was a travelling salesman who was carrying the virus and who took a very roundabout route (obviously, he couldn't find a good solution to the travelling salesman problem) to get to the various places he was going to. Of course you could model it as a network but I doubt the shortest path would give you much useful information.
Oct
16
comment Do the bacterial species X, Y, Z code for proteins A, B, C?
@codax no, each query protein should have its own set of HSPs. You are looking for HSPs that have i) high sequence identity and ii) cover the entire length of the query sequence (or nearly). Now that you know they are there and have high similarity, you can also use exonerate to match the genes more precisely.
Oct
13
comment Applications of shortest path problem
@TanMath here you go, but it won't help you much. The shortest path analysis was a tiny part of the work, I only mentioned it because I happened to have done this recently. Your best bet is to go on PubMed and search for "shortest path".
Oct
13
revised Applications of shortest path problem
added 158 characters in body
Oct
13
answered Applications of shortest path problem
Oct
9
comment Why do my 23andme results only show me as 8.2% Scandinavian?
@Amory actually, I would guess that's not true, strictly speaking. I doubt that chromosomal cross-over would produce a 50% split. I would expect a range of 49.999-50.0001% or so from each parent. If we're being pedantic, that is :)
Oct
6
comment Do the bacterial species X, Y, Z code for proteins A, B, C?
@codax OK, if you have a list of proteins you want, get their sequences from a related species of bacterium, the closer the better, and use those sequences to query your target genomes. The methods I describe are sensitive enough to deal with small differences in sequence.