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From the era before Sanger sequencing was invented.


17h
comment What makes certain obligate anaerobes viable in fermentation starter cultures?
Do you have a reference for the fact that they are obligate anaerobes?
1d
revised No digested product bands, but markers are visible. What could be the reasons?
edited title
2d
comment Why is too much glucose harmful?
An excellent answer - it really should be accepted.
Jul
29
comment “Same” DNA vs genes
Repeat of biology.stackexchange.com/questions/9172/…
Jul
27
comment Why is too much glucose harmful?
Perhaps worth adding that the level of glycated haemoglobin is used as a way of monitoring how well diabetes is being controlled over the long term.
Jul
27
comment Why is too much glucose harmful?
This answer has things backwards. In diabetes the failure of the insulin response to high blood sugar means that the glucose carriers are not recruited to the cell membranes. This results in a decreased capacity for glucose uptake and so blood sugar stays high. Also, glucose does not "oxidise itself".
Jul
27
revised Why is too much glucose harmful?
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Jul
27
revised Why is too much glucose harmful?
deleted 4 characters in body
Jul
21
revised To what extent do domestic animals understand language?
edited body; edited title
Jul
17
comment Why doesn't honey spoil quickly?
see biology.stackexchange.com/questions/19744/…
Jul
15
answered What is this discarded exoskeleton from?
Jul
15
revised What is the name of this flower with purple leaves and orange inner part in NYC?
added 407 characters in body
Jul
15
answered What is the name of this flower with purple leaves and orange inner part in NYC?
Jul
14
comment Turning publicly available genome data into proteins
I think that you need to be more specific than "I downloaded a complete human genome". Was this an entire genome sequence, or a set of FASTA sequences corresponding to predicted proteins?
Jul
11
comment How big can cold-blooded animals get?
Wikipedia en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Physiology_of_dinosaurs#Metabolism looks like a good place to start.
Jul
11
comment The move from RNA to DNA and the necessity of reverse transcriptase
You may be interested in the paper here: jbc.org/content/275/33/25523.full.pdf . The authors find that single mutations in an RNA-directed RNA polymerase can reduce selectivity for an NTP substrate to the point that there is no significant preference for NTPs over dNTPs. However this comes at the cost of very much reduced rate of polymerisation.
Jul
11
comment The move from RNA to DNA and the necessity of reverse transcriptase
This argument seems to be very circular. In an RNA world there presumably wouldn't be any DNA polymerase at all - what we should be looking for is an enzyme that can make DNA using an RNA template - which is a reverse transcriptase. The key step in the evolution of such an enzyme would be switching from polymerising NTPs to polymerising dNTPs.
Jul
11
comment The move from RNA to DNA and the necessity of reverse transcriptase
@Chris yes, apologies for the ambiguity, OP asserts that standard DNA polymerase can use RNA template, but I would like to see the evidence for this.
Jul
11
comment The move from RNA to DNA and the necessity of reverse transcriptase
Could you give a reference for standard DNA polymerases using an RNA template?
Jul
11
comment Significance of synthesis of D-glucose in plants..?
@Chris has explained the advantage of using one isomer - why do you think that it would be advantageous to synthesise and use both?